WORLD TODAY DISCUSSION SERIES

The World Today Discussion Series engages students in interactive dialogue and enriching conversations around current issues that transcend borders. UCLA and Anderson faculty, alumni, board members and thought leaders share their perspectives on the critical business, policy and socioeconomic issues that affect us all. Through balanced discourse, the series serves as a neutral forum to educate the Anderson community on global issues, while at the same time encouraging debate and examination.

 

Series Highlights

 

Environmental Sustainability in Asia and the Role of Green Finance in the World


February 4, 2021

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China’s announcement of its pledge to achieve carbon neutrality by 2060 (and subsequent announcements by Japan and South Korea) could help significantly slow global warming. In recent years, China has emerged as a leader in clean energy technologies, including solar panels and wind turbines. It is also the world’s largest manufacturer of electric cars and buses. Green bonds and other types of sustainable financing could play a major role in driving China’s pledge to be carbon-neutral within the next four decades, as sustainable investing gains more traction in investment portfolios. The U.N.’s Environment team is already working with public and private sector organizations in an attempt to align international financial systems to its sustainable development agenda. At a national level, too, central banks are making noises about prioritizing greener investment. The U.S. incoming administration has made clear that climate change will be one of its priorities. How will different types of economies and political systems East and West cope with a problem so large? If governments fail to properly price the costs of carbon related pollution, what responsibilities do private companies have? How should the conflict between shareholders and other stakeholders be managed?

The  Center for Global Management hosted a moderated conversation to address these important issues.  Ivo Welch, distinguished professor and J. Fred Weston Chair in Finance and a highly respected authority on socially responsible investing joined  Christine Loh, visiting professor, former deputy minister for the environment in the Hong Kong SAR Government and a subject expert and strategist on the environment, who advises HSBC, BASF and others. The discussion was moderated by  Sebastian Edwards, distinguished professor and Henry Ford II Chair in International Management. Loh and Welch analyzed the new definition of sustainability after COVID-19 and how the disruption will likely impact the future sustainability policies in the U.S., Asia and the world. They examined the tradeoffs associated with the future provision of energy necessary to support modern economies and shared their longer-term views on the role of green financing to address the central issue of our time - the impact of fossil fuel related emissions on human economic activity and wellbeing. The global audience of students, alumni, faculty, staff, and members of the extended UCLA community and general public asked many important questions during the audience Q&A that went into a deeper discussion on some of the key topics raised and touched on ESG, cap and trade as well as nuclear energy and rising sea levels. The discussion which was part of the CGM’s World Today Discussion Series was co-sponsored by the UCLA School of Law’s Emmett Institute on Climate Change and the Environment and Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy, as well as the UCLA Anderson Fink Center for Finance. The  World Today Discussion Series engages students in dialogue in an interactive, engaging and enriching discussion format around current global issues that transcend borders. Through the series, the CGM engages globally minded students with issues that matter and ideas that stimulate. Through balanced discourse, the series serves as a neutral forum to educate students on global issues while at the same time encourage debate and examination. UCLA Anderson’s Center for Global Management is committed to providing timely and relevant information about critical global topics and issues that matter to our community and the world.

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U.S.- India Relations


November 16, 2020

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The U.S.-India relationship is vital to security and stability in the world and is founded on a shared commitment to freedom, democratic principles, and the rule of law. The strong people-to-people ties between the countries, reflected in a strong Indian American diaspora, have been a tremendous source of strength for the partnership. U.S.-Indian relations have recently benefited from close ties between Prime Minister Modi and President Trump, following a 20-year effort to improve relations that has survived many political transitions in both countries. The past two decades have seen a surge in bilateral trade and a growing convergence of strategic interests, and in recent years a series of military co-operation deals. On many transnational issues, including cybersecurity, freedom of navigation in the Indian Ocean, and climate change - New Delhi and Washington are natural partners linked by common interests and values. Growing antagonism between China and the West also favors closer links between India and the US. Taken together, this should provide confidence for the future of the relationship. Will economic retrenchment and economic headwinds due to the COVID pandemic dampen US-India ties, or will these flourish as China’s global ambitions become subject to greater pushback?

The  Center for Global Management and  Indian School of Business (ISB) hosted a discussion on U.S.-India relations that addressed these questions and more.  Arvind Singhal (’82), president of the UCLA Anderson Alumni Chapter in India and chairman of Technopak Advisors moderated a fascinating and broad reaching discussion with  Shyam Saran, 26th foreign secretary of India;  Keshav Murugesh, group CEO of WNS Global Services, a NYSE listed company in the BPM business headquartered in Mumbai; and  Romain Wacziarg, professor of economics and Hans Hufschmid Chair in Management who teaches the CGM’s business environment of India global immersion courses.  Bhagwan Chowdhry, professor of finance at ISB and research professor at UCLA Anderson provided opening remarks. Singhal set the context for the 90-minute conversation by addressing three historical phases of the relationship: pre-1947; post India’s independence and pre-reforms in India; and post-Cold War. He contextualized the relationship through different prisms. Panelists then explored the strategic relations, macro linkages of trade and financial flows as well as the business and societal linkages between the world’s two largest democracies. The global audience of students, alumni, faculty, staff, and members of the extended UCLA and ISB communities and general public asked many interesting questions during the audience Q&A that went into a deeper discussion on some of the key topics raised and addressed the Regional Comprehensive Economic Partnership (RECP), arguably the largest free trade agreement in history that was recently signed by 15 countries. India was to be a member of the RCEP but withdrew. During open discussion among the panelists, they also addressed what opportunities exist to expand the U.S.-India partnership in support of mutual interests during these challenging times with the hope that India and the United States will someday attain the relationship they deserve. Panelists reached an optimistic consensus on the bright future of U.S.-India relations. The discussion which was part of the CGM’s World Today Discussion Series was in partnership with The Global ISB Forum (TGIF), supported by the ISB-EY Initiative for Emerging Markets. The  World Today Discussion Series engages students in dialogue in an interactive, engaging and enriching discussion format around current global issues that transcend borders. Through the series, the CGM engages globally minded students with issues that matter and ideas that stimulate. Through balanced discourse, the series serves as a neutral forum to educate students on global issues while at the same time encourage debate and examination. UCLA Anderson’s Center for Global Management is committed to providing timely and relevant information about critical global topics and issues that matter to our community and the world. 

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Equity, Diversity and Inclusion in the Workplace Around the Globe


November 12, 2020

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The events of 2020, including the COVID-19 pandemic and social unrest have turned workplaces upside down and are changing and shaping the world we live in. Amid the pandemic, many employees are struggling to do their jobs now that the boundaries between work and home have blurred. Challenges that women already faced have been intensified. There has also been a shift in the global understanding of diversity, equity and inclusion. Diversity spans many dimensions – both visible and invisible identities – and our descriptions and approaches must be intersectional. Workers also want equitable and inclusive environments that are safe and welcome a variety of voices. The choices companies must make now are critical and urgent, and could shape the workplace for decades to come.

The  Center for Global Management hosted a moderated conversation with leaders from across Europe, Latin America and the United States. Not only have these women tackled leadership challenges, they have done so in sectors not particularly known for diversity—namely finance, technology and education. The conversation was moderated by  Professor Sebastian Edwards. Panelists included: UCLA alumna  Marilou Calara (B.S. ’86), chief operating officer of EMEA Investments, Citi Private Bank who has been with Citi for almost twenty years since receiving her MBA from Berkeley and originally considering a career in the foreign service; U.S.-based  Katrina Jones, diversity and inclusion lead for Amazon Web Services ProServe who has served as a D&I lead at large, complex global companies and startups and now oversees thousands of employees at AWS; and Chile-based  Manola Sanchez, former dean, Universidad Adolfo Ibanez, who spent time at McKinsey and Goldman Sachs and was the first Chilean woman to obtain an MBA from Harvard Business School. Drawing on professional and personal experiences, panelists shared stories and unique perspectives from their own careers. They addressed challenges faced along the way and provided insights on equity, diversity and inclusion in their respective countries and regions as well as across global workforces. They highlighted the power of unfamiliar perspectives and experiences and showed how international and domestic diversity go hand in hand. The discussion underscored how this moment in time requires long-term thinking, creativity, strong leadership, and a laser focus on the value of diversity and inclusion in the workplace. The global audience of students, alumni, faculty, staff, and members of the extended UCLA community and general public asked many interesting questions during the audience Q&A that went into a deeper discussion on some of the key topics raised. The discussion which was part of the CGM’s  World Today Discussion Series was also proudly featured as an Embracing Diversity Series event, and as a lead up to UCLA Anderson’s Embracing Diversity Week and UCLA’s International Education Week. The  World Today Discussion Series engages students in dialogue in an interactive, engaging and enriching discussion format around current global issues that transcend borders. Through the series, the CGM engages globally minded students with issues that matter and ideas that stimulate. Through balanced discourse, the series serves as a neutral forum to educate students on global issues while at the same time encourage debate and examination. UCLA Anderson’s Center for Global Management is committed to providing timely and relevant information about critical global topics and issues that matter to our community and the world.

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A Rethink on the Global Supply Chain in the Midst of the COVID-19 Pandemic


May 11, 2020

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As a nation of plenty, Americans are in shock when state governors are pleading the federal government for a greater allocation of emergency stockpiles, and medical professionals are appealing for donations of personal protective equipment (PPE) such as face masks and gloves. While the COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the world’s risky dependence on vulnerable nodes in global supply chains, it has also cast a spotlight on companies that already have flexible production lines. Nimble luxury goods manufacturers in Europe overhauled operations and turned their supply chains to masks and gowns; LVMH’s perfume factories were producing hand sanitizer; and makers of cars and planes started to assemble ventilators and other equipment. Flexible supply chains have played a critical role, including rapid raw material sourcing, product design, development and testing, and distribution. The Center for Global Management (CGM) hosted its sixth virtual discussion in its Special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series with  Chris Tang, distinguished professor and Edward W. Carter Chair in Business Administration and a highly respected authority on global supply chains. Tang explored the root causes to the shortage of PPE in the United States and addressed the current response. He also examined what we can learn from the current crisis and explored whether COVID-19 will be the catalyst that forces many companies, and entire industries, to rethink their global supply chain strategy and manage it in a more resilient manner. Tang also shared his longer term view on whether post COVID-19 local resilience will be prized over global efficiency. Following an extremely engaging and thought-provoking presentation with numerous timely and relevant global examples, Tang continued the conversation with  Professor Sebastian Edwards and answered many thoughtful and pertinent questions from an engaged audience which comprised over 500 students, alumni, faculty, staff and members of the extended UCLA and global community. He addressed reshoring and supply chain financing and shared some key ideas for managing supply chain risk including innovations in advanced robotics, 3D printing and blockchain; the role of government and regulations for mission critical products; and the importance of supply chain transparency and identifying, accessing and mitigating supply chain risks. Tang has conducted research on global supply chain for over 30 years and has co-written a book on “Supply Chain Risk Management” and published over 100 articles on this subject. The CGM’s Special COVID-19  World Today Discussion Series aims to engage the community in interactive dialogue around implications of the COVID-19 global pandemic that transcends borders. In this Series, through Zoom presentations and discussions open to the UCLA Anderson community: UCLA and Anderson faculty, alumni, board members and thought leaders share their perspectives on the critical business, policy and socioeconomic issues that affect us all. These are unprecedented times. UCLA Anderson’s Center for Global Management is committed to providing timely and relevant information about critical global topics and issues that matter to our community and the world.

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2020 Protests Around the World: Making Sense of the Turmoil—Socioeconomic and Business Perspectives


Janaury 29, 2020

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In 2019, demonstrations around the globe, both peaceful and violent were set off by social unrest over economic instability, government corruption and inequality. The protests created a domino effect, crossing borders and bringing crowds of people to streets globally to demand change. In Great Britain, mass demonstrations took place both for and against Brexit, destined to define the country’s future; in France, a year into the yellow vest protests, while demonstrations waned in size, grievances remain; in Chile, anger at increases in public transport costs grew into a broad-based movement protesting inequality; in Lebanon, a levy on WhatsApp calls sparked pent-up anger, forcing Prime Minister Saad Hariri to resign in October; and in Hong Kong, a June rally against a law allowing extradition to China morphed into a broad anti-China movement. The desire to be heard was felt by people from different nationalities, religions and political affiliations. The UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management hosted a discussion over dinner with Christine Loh, visiting professor and former Government minister, Hong Kong S.A.R. Government; Chris Tang, Edward W. Carter Chair In Business Administration; and Romain Wacziarg, Hans Hufschmid Chair in Management who addressed the global landscape and explored the worldwide push for action from a socio-economic and business perspective. While there is little certainty on what will happen going forward, they also shared their longer term views and the possible wider implications for business and society that could evolve as citizens across the globe continue to protest injustices, demand reforms and push for change. They also addressed the role of government. The discussion was moderated by Sebastian Edwards, Henry Ford II Chair in International Management. The packed room included faculty and students from the UCLA Anderson and its full-time, fully employed and executive MBA as well as Ph.D. programs. Students from the UCLA School of Law and UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs were also invited to attend. The World Today Discussion Series engages students in dialogue in an interactive, engaging and enriching discussion format around current global issues that transcend borders. Through the series, the CGM engages globally minded students with issues that matter and ideas that stimulate. Through balanced discourse, the series serves as a neutral forum to educate students on global issues while at the same time encourage debate and examination.

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