Archive

2020 - 2021

 
Wednesday, October 14, 2020 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM

A Virtual Lunchtime Conversation with Lino Abram (’99), Senior Partner, McKinsey & Co. on “A Global Consulting Career and COVID-19: Implications for Businesses Across Latin America”

On Wednesday, October 14, the Center for Global Management and the Latin American Business Association (LABA) hosted a virtual lunchtime discussion with Lima-based UCLA Anderson alumnus Lino Abram (’99), senior partner at McKinsey & Co. who founded the Lima, Peru office where he leads the financial services practice for many Latin American countries. The luncheon provided an opportunity for interested MBA students to meet with Abram in an informal and interactive virtual setting and hear about his successful career trajectory post-Anderson and extensive consulting career with McKinsey & Co. in Latin America and the Caribbean. He shared his thoughts on comparative challenges helping companies do business across the region in light of the digital revolution and limited access to talent and addressed the implications for businesses across the region, in the short and longer terms as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Over 40 students from the full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs, including members of LABA, the Management Consulting Association (MCA) and students interested in global management joined the interactive lunchtime session joined to hear Abram share his experiences and insights around recent learnings from COVID-19 and digital transformations. Since joining McKinsey & Co. in 1999, Abram has worked across much of Latin America and the Caribbean. During his 21 years with McKinsey, he has served clients in financial services, private equity, consumer goods, and mining and metals. More recently, he has been leading the assessment of digital transformation of Latin American businesses and how this is changing the consulting services industry. The lunch, organized by the Latin American Business Association in partnership with the Center for Global Management, was supported by the Management Consulting Association.

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Tuesday, October 13, 2020 5:00 – 6:30 p.m.

Global Immersion Series: Argentina Reunion

Argentina was able to recover relatively quickly from its last major economic crisis, in 2001, thanks to a booming global economy. Unfortunately, the situation is very different today. The Argentine government, that took office last year, imposed one of the strictest quarantines in the region. It was a desperate attempt to control the spread — and one that only partially succeeded. While the swift lockdown doubtless helped save lives — the aggressiveness of the measures may have effects for years to come. Even before the pandemic, Argentina’s economic situation was fairly dire — according to the INDEC national statistics bureau around one third of the country’s population was living in poverty in the second half of 2019 — leaving the country more exposed than most to the impact of lockdown. On Tuesday, October 13, the CGM hosted the seventh reunion in its Global Immersion Series, this time focused on Argentina with Andres Terech, associate adjunct professor of marketing who has led two global immersion courses and one EMBA international business residential to his home country. Terech accompanied his first group to Argentina in the summer of 2014 and then in spring of 2017, led a second group to the country that also visited Uruguay for a course focused on “The Challenges and Opportunities of Doing Business in Latin America.” In September 2018, Terech accompanied a group of EMBA students to Argentina for their International Business Residential, a core requirement of the EMBA program. Alumni reunited and shared personal updates before Terech provided an update on the country from a macro perspective. He was then joined by UCLA Anderson alumnus Juan M. Procaccini (’01), lead partner in the deals advisory practice at PwC in its Buenos Aires office who provided an “on the ground” update on what is happening in Argentina, the economy and political situation and shared his experience on what has happened in the country since the COVID-19 pandemic. He also addressed both challenges and opportunities faced by businesses (large and small) and society under these circumstances and shared his thoughts on what changes he sees organizationally and structurally going forward for the country. Alumni from the full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs representing the classes of 2015 through 2019 who had enrolled in the three aforementioned courses reunited with classmates and reflected on time spent in Argentina to learn what has changed in the country’s business environment as well as its socio-economic and political landscape since traveling together. The economic crisis consuming the country’s most vulnerable members of society was also addressed as well as the measures that may be needed to save the economy of a country that unfortunately has been in crisis for years. During interactive dialogue with the alumni, questions arose on topics such as climate change, opportunities for investment, Argentina’s strong entrepreneurial and start-up community as well as the country’s movement in fintech initiatives. The event was organized and hosted by the Center for Global Management.

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Wednesday, September 23, 2020 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM

Leadership: Changing Paradigm Series: Leading with an Adaptive Culture for a Better Future

With the onset of COVID-19 and the emergence of the new business reality, company founders and corporate leaders are experiencing significant disruption of their strategic plans and operations, while trying to fulfill commitments to their employees and communities. Many executives recognize that a strong corporate culture can help to navigate the current crisis while positioning their companies for future success. However, even cultures that are strategically aligned need to be adaptive to allow companies to change, innovate and respond to new opportunities. An adaptive culture is among a company’s most powerful tools for creating a competitive advantage. During this current period of disruption resulting from COVID-19, the economic downturn and the social justice movement, those companies with a strong culture have been better positioned to rapidly adapt to the new reality. On September 23, in collaboration with HARRT at UCLA, the Centers@Anderson hosted a moderated conversation with Morley Builders’ president Charles Muttillo and Megan Sutton, Morley’s vice president of human resources. Morley Builders was founded on the values of integrity, honesty, respect for others and ethical behavior. Over its more than 70-year history, it has significantly expanded its business and moved from a family-owned residential contracting company to become one of the top commercial builders in Southern California, with several iconic buildings in Los Angeles, including many at UCLA. The discussion, moderated by UCLA Anderson Professor Corinne Bendersky, faculty director of HARRT addressed how Morley has experienced significant growth while adapting its culture under Muttillo’s leadership, and how today, as an award-winning 100% employee-owned company, they enjoy a reputation as a “best place to work” in Los Angeles. Muttillo and Sutton also shared how throughout the company's history, it has preserved the values established by its founder, while adapting its culture to meet the changing needs of customers, employees and the community and explained how its strong company culture has contributed to their customer satisfaction, employee engagement and response to the pandemic crisis. The audience included students, faculty, alumni and board members from UCLA Anderson as well as members of HARRT and the general community. During audience Q&A, panelists addressed many questions, including how Morley has managed to instill and promote collaboration, group thinking and innovation in the online world and how its leadership team has stayed motivated and avoided burn out during the pandemic. This discussion was a collaboration among the Centers of UCLA Anderson and HARRT (the Human Resources Round Table) at UCLA. UCLA Anderson Dean Tony Bernardo provided opening remarks.

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Thursday, September 17, 2020 6:00 – 7:30 PM

Global Immersion Series: Southeast Asia Reunion

Despite high rates of poverty and weak healthcare systems in many countries in the Southeast Asia region, relatively few deaths have been recorded from the virus. Southeast Asian governments have mobilized public and private resources to control community spread. Voluntary social distancing measures were introduced, as well as more aggressive lockdowns and quarantines. The countries also have displayed impressive levels of transparency about COVID-19. Many governments have also worked to ensure that their coronavirus response measures impose minimal financial costs on their populations—critical moves to getting broad public buy-in. However, each country has faced trade-offs between the immediate need to manage the pandemic and the socioeconomic costs of doing so. On Thursday, September 18, the CGM hosted the sixth reunion discussion in its Global Immersion Series, this time focused on the dynamic Southeast Asia region. Professor Jerry Nickelsburg, adjunct full professor and director of the UCLA Anderson Forecast reunited with alumni and students from the full-time, FEMBA, EMBA and UCLA-NUS EMBA classes of 2015, 2017, 2018, 2020 and 2021. These alumni and students had joined Professor Nickelsburg for one of his three courses focused on the region. In 2013, during his first course, students learned about international business at the confluence of Western, Chinese and Islamic economies through visits to Malaysia and Singapore. Three years later, his second course analyzed business in emerging markets with a particular emphasis on, and travel to Thailand and Myanmar; and most recently, in the winter of 2019 for one of the final courses before the pandemic, in December students visited Singapore and Thailand to learn about business and the new dynamics of international trade.

Following some introductions by alumni participants, Professor Nickelsburg provided a brief update on the southeast Asia region. He was then joined live by UCLA-NUS EMBA alumnus Ryan Tan (’19), COO of D’Crypt in Singapore, who facilitated many of the recent visits and speakers for the December 2019 course; and Ricardo Ortiz, ASEAN specialist and foreign policy analyst in Bangkok, who spoke about the political landscape in Bangkok during the most recent visit. Tan and Ortiz provided on-the-ground updates on what is happening in Singapore, Thailand and the Southeast Asia region more broadly with respect to COVID-19, the economy, social landscape and political climate and shared their experiences with how their two countries have responded and handled the pandemic and how they foresee the pandemic shaping Southeast Asia’s economic future. During interactive dialogue with the alumni and student participants, they also addressed some of the economic and social challenges that both countries face, including some of the issues that have been brought to the forefront by the pandemic. For example, the social debate on the rights of migrant workers in Singapore, the devastating hit to Singapore’s open and trade-dependent economy and resulting economic impact, the effect the pandemic has had on Thailand’s vital tourism industry, and the “youthquake” that is currently being witnessed in Bangkok as the young people in the country are raising their voices through social media. The event was organized and hosted by the Center for Global Management.

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Wednesday, September 9, 2020 5:00 – 6:00 PM

Leadership: Changing Paradigm Series: COVID-19: Leadership Imperatives for Today and Learnings for Tomorrow. A Discussion on Leadership Learnings from the Pandemic with Dr. John C. Mazziotta, CEO, UCLA Health System and Vice Chancellor, UCLA Health Sciences

Few countries have been as severely hit by the pandemic than the United States. With just 4 percent of the world’s population, the U.S. has endured a quarter of its confirmed COVID-19 cases and deaths. As the world grapples with the fear and uncertainty of the pandemic, effective leadership and sharing of best practices at all levels - business, policy and government - becomes more important than ever. On September 9, the Centers@Anderson hosted an extremely insightful conversation with Dr. John C. Mazziotta, vice chancellor of UCLA Health Sciences that has been at the forefront of COVID-19 research and treatment and is positioned to make a transformative and enduring impact on this global pandemic. Mazziotta addressed where the U.S. stands with COVID-19 today and provided a holistic view across healthcare providers, medical schools, industry and government. During the discussion, that was moderated by Professor Terry Kramer, Dr. Mazziotta examined the role of public health, data and science and discussed leadership learnings around decision-making and how the U.S. could have more effectively harnessed its resources, including technology and human resources in fighting the pandemic. Mazziotta also shared his longer term views on how leadership will likely change in the future and ultimately how technology will fundamentally change the delivery and outcomes in healthcare, globally.

The global audience included over 500 students, faculty, alumni and board members from the UCLA Anderson School of Management and UCLA Health/UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine as well as members of the extended UCLA community, including the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, Luskin School of Public Affairs, School of Law and Henry Samueli School of Engineering, and members of the general public. Some of the key takeaways from the discussion which touched on a number of complex public health and leadership issues were summarized by Professor Kramer. First, that the COVID-19 situation is a manageable issue but you have to respect the science as part of the solution. Technology is also key and has a big role to play, for example in access for underserved communities, in access for ongoing healthcare and for better outcomes. Mazziotta said: “From this day forward, medicine will never be the same again and we are going to see everything change, including how we work together, health systems, government regulations, as well as electronic and technological advances.” One of the great lessons that Mazziotta has learned is how responsive, collaborative, and committed the whole society becomes during a time of this kind of crisis. He added that he has been extremely impressed by society’s willingness, openness and generosity and also by the commitment, dedication and courage of the people that work for the UCLA Health System. We thank Dr. Mazziotta for his compassionate leadership and for all the vitally important work that he and his colleagues at UCLA Health are doing. This discussion was a collaboration among the Centers at Anderson and UCLA Health and the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine. UCLA Anderson Dean Tony Bernardo provided opening remarks.

About the Leadership: Changing Paradigm Series.
In a global environment of greater opportunities and challenges, with greater demands on leaders, businesses and society, new leadership paradigms must be assessed and acted on to ensure future success. This series will address leadership imperatives for today and learnings for tomorrow with general themes about the growing interdisciplinary nature of leadership, a changing paradigm for decision making and a more expansive view on the role of stakeholders including employees, government and society in addition to shareholders. Attendees of these events should come away with an enhanced understanding of leadership that will serve them longer-term contextualized with today’s issues and opportunities. The series is a collaboration between the Centers of UCLA Anderson.

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Tuesday, August 18, 2020 6:00 – 7:30 PM

Global Immersion Series: Vietnam Reunion

On Tuesday, August 18, the CGM hosted the fifth event in its Global Immersion Series, focused on Vietnam. Professor George Abe (B.A. ’69, M.S. ’71), adjunct assistant professor of entrepreneurship reunited with alumni from the full-time, FEMBA and EMBA classes of 2012, 2013, 2016, 2017, 2019 and 2020. These alumni had joined Professor Abe and visited Ho Chi Minh City and Hanoi first back in 2011 with the initial iteration of the global immersion courses, which were formerly known as “International Studies” and run through Anderson’s ProMBA office. In 2016, the courses fully transitioned to the Center for Global Management and were renamed “Global Immersion.” These courses are now available to students in all four of Anderson’s MBA programs. Two subsequent groups visited Vietnam. Once in December 2015 and more recently in December 2018. The focus of the most recent course shifted away from the general doing business in southeast Asia and Vietnam focus to concentrate more specifically on entrepreneurship in developing countries, with a focus on Vietnam.

Up until a new strain recently emerged, Vietnam had been praised for keeping COVID-19 cases low and even avoided any COVID-19 deaths. Its early success has been attributed to a well-developed public health system, a strong central government, and a proactive containment strategy based on comprehensive testing, tracing and quarantining, and ensuring consistent messages while enforcing regulations stringently. While certain aspects of Vietnam’s response to COVID-19 may not be replicable in other countries, its experience with past epidemics encouraged citizens to take significant steps to slow the spread of the virus. Most businesses returned to normal a couple of months ago and the country has won the hearts and minds of its people and received accolades from around the globe. Following some introductions by alumni participants, Professor Abe provided a brief update on the COVID-19 situation in Vietnam, compared to other countries around the world. He was then joined by EMBA alumnus and entrepreneur, Calvin Lam (’01), whom all three classes met and heard from in Vietnam and who runs successful businesses in the country across various sectors, including women’s apparel, forestry and food and beverage. Lam provided an “on the ground” update on what is happening in Vietnam with COVID-19, the economy, the political situation and shared his experience on how the country aggressively and successfully handled the pandemic. He also addressed both challenges and opportunities faced by business under these circumstances, in particular manufacturing - and how business leaders have had to adapt. He shared his thoughts on what changes he sees organizationally and structurally going forward, lessons from Vietnam’s successful early detection and containment strategy and explained why the country is particularly suited to mobilizing resources and implementing public health strategies. The event was organized and hosted by the Center for Global Management.

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Thursday, August 13, 2020 5:00 – 6:30 PM

Leadership: Changing Paradigms Series: COVID-19: What Have We Learned from Other Nations? A Discussion on Where Should We Import Leadership Learnings and What are the Key Enablers?

The COVID-19 pandemic has created a massive humanitarian challenge and is affecting every aspect of global society and civilization. A variety of enablers – or lack thereof – have driven notably different outcomes dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic including the use of technology, the role of the state, cultural norms and public health capabilities. While the epidemiological aspects and economic consequences of the pandemic have been frequently discussed, there has been much less attention paid to these key enablers. Recently, McKinsey has conducted interesting research about a unique use of technology and the state in Asia in addressing COVID-19. Europe also offers some interesting insights. The challenges in developing effective strategies to combat COVID-19 highlight the critical and changing role of leadership. As the world transitions into the next stage of the global pandemic, now is the time to reflect on which countries handled the initial outbreak response better than others and what lessons can be learned. In a globalized world fighting a virus that does not respect borders, it is imperative to examine best practices and review experiences in fighting this common enemy.

On August 13, the Centers@UCLA Anderson hosted a broad and deep moderated conversation that covered politics, economics, national issues and global issues – all contextualized in fighting the COVID-19 pandemic. Panelists included Dr. Robert Kim-Farley, who holds joint appointments in the departments of epidemiology and community health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health; Chandran Nair, founder and CEO of the Global Institute for Tomorrow, an independent pan-Asian think tank focused on advancing a deeper understanding of global issues including the shift of economic and political influence from the West to Asia and the dynamic relationship between business and society; and Jeongmin Seong, partner and Lily Ma, rotational fellow at the McKinsey Global Institute in Shanghai and authors of MGI’s “ How Technology is Safeguarding Health and Livelihoods in Asia” that highlights the steps that Asia has taken to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic. The discussion was moderated by Professor Terry Kramer, adjunct professor and faculty director of the Easton Technology Management Center. Panelists gathered virtually to analyze what lessons can be learned for the United States and its leaders – business leaders, elected officials, policymakers - from Asia and other countries such as New Zealand about decision-making; the role of government and public health institutions versus business; power of collaboration and innovation; and the broad usefulness and effectiveness of digital technologies and the practical issues of compliance – again, all contextualized in fighting the COVID-19 pandemic.

The global audience included around 300 students, faculty and alumni from the UCLA Anderson School of Management and the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health as well as members of the extended UCLA community including the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs, David Geffen School of Medicine, School of Law and Henry Samueli School of Engineering, and general public. The audience Q&A touched on issues of data privacy; U.S. “exceptionalism;” how nations can establish a global approach to collecting and sharing data in particular around COVID-19; and what societal tools or government programs/policies are needed in the U.S. to better incentive people to collectively incorporate and adhere to COVID protocols. There were many key takeaways from the discussion that Professor Kramer succinctly summarized at the end. His final takeaway was on the outlook going forward and that these issues are global issues and not national issues. This isn’t about a rank order of countries and how well they are doing. As time goes on, these big looming threats and opportunities are global ones and either we are going to work together and get a better outcome or we are all going to suffer. This reiterated the importance around learning about the world (and best practices from other nations). The discussion was a collaboration between the Centers at UCLA Anderson and the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. UCLA Anderson Dean Tony Bernardo provided opening remarks.

About the Leadership: Changing Paradigm Series.
In a global environment of greater opportunities and challenges, with greater demands on leaders, businesses and society, new leadership paradigms must be assessed and acted on to ensure future success. This series will address leadership imperatives for today and learnings for tomorrow with general themes about the growing interdisciplinary nature of leadership, a changing paradigm for decision making and a more expansive view on the role of stakeholders including employees, government and society in addition to shareholders. Attendees of these events should come away with an enhanced understanding of leadership that will serve them longer-term contextualized with today’s issues and opportunities. The series is a collaboration between the Centers of UCLA Anderson.

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Wednesday, August 12, 2020 5:00 – 6:30 PM

Global Immersion Series: South Africa Reunion

On Wednesday, August 12, the CGM hosted the fourth event in its Global Immersion Series, focused on South Africa. Professor Gayle Northrop, continuing lecturer at Anderson reunited with around 40 alumni from the full-time and FEMBA classes of 2017, 2018, 2019 and 2020. These alumni had joined Northrop and the CGM and visited Johannesburg and Cape Town in September 2016 and 2018 for the CGM’s global immersion course to learn about social innovation and social entrepreneurship in the country. During the reunion, alumni reconnected with classmates; reflected on time spent in South Africa; and learned what has changed in the country’s social enterprise landscape, plus what has happened in the country since the COVID-19 pandemic. While South Africa’s initial response to the virus was widely praised, confidence in the government’s handling of the crisis has wavered. The country has become the worst-affected in Africa and the 5th highest in total cases worldwide. As students learned in class, the southernmost country on the African continent is one of the most unequal societies in the world with one of the highest consistent Gini coefficients. Poverty and unemployment remain at consistently high levels, with the pandemic putting even greater pressure on the country’s already strained health system. Overcrowded living conditions in low income townships make physical distancing difficult, clean water is not always available for hand-washing, and people are forced to travel in overcrowded public transportation. The session touched on these and other factors affecting South Africa today and into the future.

Following some introductions, Professor Northrop who also is senior advisor at the Bertha Centre for Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship at the University of Cape Town (UCT) Graduate School of Business (GSB), opened with an update on what has been happening in South Africa. She shared some statistics as she addressed the economy, politics and the impact of COVID-19. Professor Northrop was joined live from South Africa by Ian Calvert, formerly with Red Bull Amaphiko and now founder of FURTHER, whom students met in Cape Town and Laurie Bruns, senior Africa regional director for the UCLA Global Health Institute. They provided an “on the ground” update on what is happening in South Africa today with COVID-19, the economy, political situation and in particular, the social entrepreneurship and social innovation landscape. The discussion touched on some of the many challenges faced by social enterprises today, how social entrepreneurs have had to adapt, and why the country’s unique history and circumstances affect its response to the pandemic. Calvert addressed the status and importance of social enterprises in South Africa and shared some examples and updates of social entrepreneurs who students had met in-country and the exciting new enterprises they are now involved with. Bruns added her perspective on health trends and health system challenges. It was a wonderful evening and the engagement of alumni was a clear indication of the long lasting impact this particular global immersion had on each and everyone who participated. The event was organized and hosted by the Center for Global Management.

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Monday, August 3, 2020 5:00 – 6:00 PM

Leadership: Changing Paradigms Series: The Dynamic Role of Technology, Business and Government in Society: A Discussion on How to Ensure the Right Outcomes with Congressman Ro Khanna, serving California’s 17th Congressional District in the heart of Silicon Valley

There is an increasing focus on the use of technology-based innovations as a means to help address the societal issues in areas such as healthcare, transportation and education; and at the same time there is a growing "tech-lash" in areas such as the digital divide, the future of work, anti-trust and data privacy. On Monday, August 3, the Centers@UCLA Anderson hosted a conversation with Congressman Ro Khanna who represents the 17th Congressional District in the heart of Silicon Valley on the role of leaders in both business and government in this environment and how this relationship is changing. Ultimately gaining a better understanding as to whether the role of government should increase in the face of growing societal issues and/or whether the role of a CEO should expand in serving a variety of constituents including shareholders, employees and society more broadly.

Khanna’s unique role in Congress operates at the very epicenter or vortex of colliding issues about the role of technology, the role of government and how to achieve beneficial outcomes for society amidst a highly polarized environment. During the conversation, moderated by Professor Terry Kramer, adjunct professor and faculty director of the Easton Technology Management Center, Khanna shared his views on the state of technology today, the most promising areas of innovation and its role in society. He also addressed the role of technology in broader societal issues today, including COVID-19 and racial injustices and discussed issues of data privacy, anti-trust, the digital divide and future of work. Later in the conversation, on a more personal leadership basis, he shared how he balances what appears to be a highly divergent set of positions and as both a “hybrid business person” and elected official, how he has balanced his own perspective and actions amidst these often differing and conflicting roles. Khanna concluded by saying that he believes “technology is transforming every aspect of our economy and underneath every aspect of society and the need to understand it, the need to be able to shape it and the need to be able to thoughtfully regulate it are some the biggest questions of 21st Century governance… and we need thoughtful voices to help guide us.” The global audience which comprised around 300 students as well as alumni, faculty and staff from UCLA Anderson, members of the extended UCLA community including the Luskin School of Public Affairs and the Henry Samueli School of Engineering, and general public asked many interesting questions during the audience Q&A that went into a deeper discussion on some of the valuable messages and key views shared, including data privacy, issues of anti-trust and the need to deal with a growing digital and income divide. Khanna was elected to his first term in Congress in 2016 and has stood at the vanguard of national progressive politics. He has remained committed to bipartisan problem-solving in Washington, passing two bills into law during his first term. Khanna has also worked for greater government transparency. As a part of the House Armed Services Committee, he has fought back against special interests and their monopolistic behavior, tackling private companies that gauge from the defense budget and increase the cost of national security, and has championed greater government investment in technology and R&D on the House Budget Committee. Khanna has worked to spread Silicon Valley jobs nationally to areas of the country left behind during the digital revolution, and has introduced multiple articles of legislation to bring jobs to economically disadvantaged communities across the country. The discussion was a collaboration between the Centers at UCLA Anderson and the UCLA Luskin Global Public Affairs. UCLA Anderson Dean Tony Bernardo provided opening remarks.

About the Leadership: Changing Paradigm Series.
In a global environment of greater opportunities and challenges, with greater demands on leaders, businesses and society, new leadership paradigms must be assessed and acted on to ensure future success. This series will address leadership imperatives for today and learnings for tomorrow with general themes about the growing interdisciplinary nature of leadership, a changing paradigm for decision making and a more expansive view on the role of stakeholders including employees, government and society in addition to shareholders. Attendees of these events should come away with an enhanced understanding of leadership that will serve them longer-term contextualized with today’s issues and opportunities. The series is a collaboration between the Centers of UCLA Anderson.

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Friday, July 31, 2020 7:30 – 9:00 PM

Global Immersion Series: India Reunion

On Friday, July 31, the Center for Global Management hosted the third event in its Global Immersion Series, focused on India. Professor Romain Wacziarg, Hans Hufschmid Chair in Management and professor of economics reunited with around 25 alumni and current students from the full-time, fully employed, executive and UCLA-NUS executive MBA classes of 2018, 2019, 2020 and 2021 who had enrolled in the CGM’s global immersion courses and traveled to Delhi and Mumbai in December 2017 and to Mumbai and Hyderabad in December 2019. Both groups were accompanied to India by Professor Wacziarg where they learned about the country’s business environment. During the 90-minute interactive session, alumni reconnected with classmates; reflected on time spent in India; and learned what has changed in the country’s business environment as well as its socio-economic and political landscape since traveling together as well as what has happened in the country since the COVID-19 pandemic. India’s pandemic preparedness and policy response has varied across states – with big differences among states and little convergence. The economic fallout from the lockdown has been massive and unprecedented. The 14-week suspension of operations has affected different sectors and regions differently, but most organizations face massive challenges to regain economic momentum. The pandemic has so far claimed more than 25,000 lives in India. Relative to population, India’s numbers are still low, but the steep rise in absolute numbers risks overwhelming the healthcare system, and triggering more restrictions that are already hampering economic recovery.

Professor Wacziarg opened with an extremely informative introduction on both the COVID situation in India as well as the economic situation. He explained that the country was already slowing down prior to the pandemic and the March 24 lockdown had forced many workers to seek a return to their villages of origin. He touched on the daily new cases, regional variation and the comparison of India vis-à-vis other countries. He also addressed the aggravating factors including high population density, poor health and sanitary infrastructure, poverty and pollution as well as the limits to state capacity to conduct test and trace policies. Professor Wacziarg was joined live from India by UCLA Anderson alumnus Abhishek Agarwal (’10) who the alumni also had met in India. Agarwal is co-founder and CEO at CreditVidya, a leading player in the alternative credit scoring space in India that leverages alternative data, AI and machine learning to facilitate institutional credit for the underserved. He provided an “on the ground” update on what is happening in India with COVID-19 and shared his experience on how the country has responded and handled the pandemic. The discussion addressed the challenges faced by business under these circumstances, in particular the consumer finance sector – a sector where it is easy to grasp the effects of the pandemic - and how business leaders have had to adapt. He also provided insights on some of the realities in the country and challenges India faces now and going forward. Professor Wacziarg also touched on the geopolitical situation too and the relationship between the United States and India. It was a very interactive session and alumni posed many thought provoking questions to better understand tand appreciate he situation in India as well as the country’s response. The event was organized and hosted by the Center for Global Management.

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Tuesday, July 28, 2020 5:00 – 6:30 PM

Global Immersion Series: Chile Reunion

On Tuesday, July 28, the Center for Global Management hosted the second event in its Global Immersion Series. Professor Sebastian Edwards, Henry Ford II Chair in International Management reunited with around 25 alumni from the full-time and fully employed MBA classes of 2016, 2017, 2019 and 2020. During their time at Anderson, the alumni had enrolled in the CGM’s global immersion courses and traveled to Santiago, Chile (December 2015 and December 2018) with Professor Edwards to learn about the economic environment and business opportunities in the country. During the 90-minute interactive session, alumni reconnected with classmates; reflected on time spent in Chile; and learned what has changed in the country’s business environment as well as its socio-economic and political landscape since traveling together as well as what has happened in the country since the COVID-19 pandemic. Chile is a rich country, with a life expectancy higher than the U.S., a solid modern health care system and a government that was quick to respond. While Chile looked as though it was well prepared to deal with the pandemic, the country now has one of the highest per capita infection rates of any major country. So how did COVID-19 come to spread so rapidly in wealthy, well-prepared Chile? Following a 30-minute discussion on recent events in the country, Professor Edwards was then joined by special guest, Manola Sanchez who zoomed in from Chile and had addressed the class in Santiago in 2018. Sanchez is former dean of UAI Business School and now serves on the board of Bci. She was the first Chilean woman to obtain an MBA from Harvard Business School. Sanchez provided an on the ground update on what is happening in the country with businesses and also with families and how the country has responded and handled the pandemic. She also shared her own experiences from both a professional and personal perspective too. The evening also addressed how the virus has exploited cracks in Chilean society and what changes may be ahead organizationally and structurally for the country. The event was organized and hosted by the Center for Global Management.

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Monday, July 20, 2020 5:00 – 6:30 PM

Virtual Dinner Discussion World Today Discussion Series: "The U.S.-China Divorce:
A Discussion on Why Rather than Decouple the United States and China Must Find Ways to Coexist"

Economically, the United States and China have been coupling up for decades and became the world’s biggest trading partners in 2014. Their economies are highly intertwined. But now, amid trade and technology wars, a global pandemic and strained diplomatic relations, judging from the White House’s recent actions, it wants to decouple the U.S. from China – economically, technologically, geopolitically and financially. However, the connections between these giant markets took decades to build and breaking up may be hard to do. A divorce will likely involve deep and wide collateral damage, affecting U.S. corporate interests with long-term ambitions in a country with advantages that are likely to sustain its position as the world’s main factory -- mature supply chains, a massive market, well-built infrastructure and skilled labor. A seismic decoupling will also negatively affect the economies of many other countries. The U.S. will need a plan.

On Monday, July 20, the Center for Global Management hosted a moderated conversation with Chris Tang, distinguished professor and Edward W. Carter Chair in Business Administration and a highly respected authority on global supply chains and Christine Loh, UCLA Anderson visiting professor and former minister in the Hong Kong SAR Government. Tang and Loh discussed why a decoupling after 40 years of mutually beneficial relations is a lose-lose situation. They explored steps that need to be considered, including a rethinking of the global supply chain, and discussed issues of trade, finance and technology as part of global shifts as a result of the decoupling and the COVID-19 pandemic. Do U.S. businesses support the U.S. strategy? Could a new era of Sino-U.S. relations be built on cooperation, starting with joint development of a COVID-19 vaccine? Could there be a mutually beneficial 5G “coopetition” that involves not only Chinese and U.S. companies, but also firms from other countries? Loh and Tang addressed many questions and analyzed why rather than a decoupling, China and the U.S. must find ways to coexist and overcome their differences, build mutual trust, and work constructively to uphold a stable and peaceful international order. The conversation was moderated by Professor Sebastian Edwards, faculty director of the CGM. The global audience which comprised over 200 enrolled and admitted students as well as alumni, faculty, staff, members of the extended UCLA community and general public asked many interesting questions during the audience Q&A that went into a deeper discussion on some of the key topics raised, including what a Biden administration could mean for the relationship between the world’s two superpowers. The World Today Discussion Series engages students in dialogue in an interactive, engaging and enriching discussion format around current global issues that transcend borders. Through the series, the CGM engages globally minded students with issues that matter and ideas that stimulate. Through balanced discourse, the series serves as a neutral forum to educate students on global issues while at the same time encourage debate and examination. UCLA Anderson’s Center for Global Management is committed to providing timely and relevant information about critical global topics and issues that matter to our community and the world.

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Wednesday, July 15, 2020 5:00 – 6:30 PM

Global Immersion Series: Colombia Reunion

On Wednesday, July 15, the Center for Global Management and Professor Gonzalo Freixes, associate dean of the FEMBA and EMBA programs reunited with around 40 alumni for the inaugural reunion event in the CGM’s new Global Immersion Series. During their time as students, the alumni participants from the full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs classes of 2017, 2018, 2019 and 2020 had enrolled in the CGM’s global immersion courses and traveled to Bogota and Cartagena (December 2016) and Bogota and Medellin (March 2019) with Professor Freixes to learn about the transformation of Colombia and its economy. During the 90-minute interactive session, the alumni reconnected with classmates; reflected on time spent in Colombia; and learned what has changed in the country’s business environment as well as its socio-economic and political landscape since traveling together as well as what has happened in the country since the COVID-19 pandemic. Colombia and Medellin in particular have emerged as COVID-19 pioneers and have been able to keep their numbers low compared to their neighbors. Dean Freixes was joined by UCLA Anderson alumni brothers Igal Jinich (’95) and Zeev Jinich (’90) who had addressed both groups in Bogota in 2016 and 2019. The brothers who run Ciplas, a third-generation family-owned and operated manufacturing business in Colombia., provided an “on the ground” update on what is happening in Colombia with COVID-19, the economy, the political situation and shared their experiences on how the country has responded and handled the pandemic and how the Colombian people’s reputation for discipline and industriousness will carry them through another difficult chapter in Colombia’s history. They also addressed the challenges they have faced running a manufacturing business under these circumstances and discussed how as business leaders they have had to adapt. The brothers also shared their thoughts on lessons lived and learned and what changes they see organizationally and structurally going forward. The event was organized and hosted by the Center for Global Management.

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Tuesday, July 14, 2020 11:00 AM

A Livestream Conversation: A Bastille Day Discussion on Emmanuel Macron, France, and Europe’s Place in the World

Is Macron the last staunch leader working to hold the European project together? And what challenges — within France, Europe, and globally — does Macron face in his mission to do so? To address these questions, on Tuesday, July 14, the Los Angeles World Affairs Council & Town Hall hosted a Bastille Day discussion with William Drozdiak, senior fellow at The Brookings Institution’s Center on the United States and Europe and longtime foreign correspondent and John Emerson, Chairman of the American Council on Germany and former U.S. Ambassador to Germany. The discussion also addressed William Drozdiak’s new book, THE LAST PRESIDENT OF EUROPE: Emmanuel Macron's Race to Revive France and Save the World, where Drozdiak argues that Macron is the last staunch leader working to hold the European project together. The book delves into Macron’s plethora of challenges in France and abroad — including Trump’s attacks on NATO and the international order, Merkel’s weakness, Italy’s government of nihilists and satirists, the Gilets Jaunes (Yellow Vests) protesters, the resurgence of anti-Semitism, and the endless turmoil of Brexit. The conversation moved beyond Drozdiak’s book to an in-depth discussion on France-Germany relations, particularly in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic and European Union post-pandemic recovery fund which Drozdiak suggests will broaden to the state of the European Union, and the state of the European continent in relation to the world. The Center for Global Management is a member of the LAWAC & Town Hall and receives special invitations that allow students and faculty to attend its programming and join in the conversations – in-person and virtually. View the recording of the conversation on YouTube.

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Wednesday, July 1, 2020 11:00 AM

A Livestream Conversation Crisis Leadership: The Road to Recovery

The pandemic and the recent protests and events surrounding George Floyd’s death have challenged organizational leaders in responding to their stakeholders, shareholders and fellow citizens. On Wednesday, July 1, the Los Angeles World Affairs Council & Town Hall hosted a virtual panel discussion on “Crisis Leadership: The Road to Recovery,” moderated by UCLA Anderson’s Corinne Bendersky, professor of management and an expert in workplace conflict, status, justice, and inclusion in teams and organizations. Bendersky was joined by Rochelle Bailis, vice president of marketing at LeaseLock, which announced a partnership with the Resident Relief Foundation, a coalition of leading multi-family organizations to raise $10 million to help residents nationwide struggling to pay their rent because of coronavirus-related job loss of illness; Christine Essel, president and CEO of Southern California Grantmakers, a vibrant community of over 300 philanthropic organizations; and Gregory C. Scott, president and CEO of Community Action Partnership of Orange County, a leading national network championing the war on poverty, racial and economic equity, strengthening families, education and youth development, financial stability, and community and economic development. Panelists shared how their respective organizations are responding to the current crisis and the considerations that they are weighing as they move forward. They addressed the lessons and management strategies that can help chart the journey ahead as state economies reopen and communities engage in conversations about racism, diversity and inclusion. Panelists also discussed the leadership qualities and behaviors that will be valued by institutions and various constituencies and how will creativity, innovation and collaboration will continue to play a role in problem-solving in this new environment. The Center for Global Management is a member of the LAWAC & Town Hall and receives special invitations that allow students and faculty to attend its programming and join in the conversations – in-person and virtually. View the recording of the conversation on YouTube.

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2019 - 2020

 
Wednesday, June 24, 2020 5:00 – 6:30 PM

Virtual Dinner Discussion Global Management Speaker Series:
"Technology Competition with China Starts with Technology Competition at Home:
A Discussion on U.S. Technology Competitiveness with Tom Wheeler, 31st Chair of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC)"

In his recent paper “ Digital Competition with China Starts with Competition at Home,” former FCC chair Tom Wheeler states that at the heart of digital competition – both in the United States and abroad – is data - the capital asset of the 21st century. The sheer scale and richness of China’s data creates an inherent digital advantage when compared to the U.S. To out-innovate China, Wheeler advocates that the U.S. should focus on meaningful competition at home and trust in the “all-American” belief that competition drives innovation. However, he asserts that the digital marketplace in the U.S. is not competitive. While America’s tech giants are innovative, nevertheless they are starving independent innovators of access to the essential data assets required for market competitiveness. He adds that U.S. public policy should explicitly embrace the concept of competition-driven innovation which begins with freeing up the data for others to use. While this does not necessarily mean breaking up the dominant companies, he advocates that it does mean “breaking them open” to unlock the assets needed for competition-driven innovation to thrive in the United States. On Wednesday, June 24, the Center for Global Management and Easton Technology Management Center hosted a moderated conversation with Tom Wheeler who provided a 360-degree view on the state of technology today, including the most promising areas of innovation and how he sees China on a comparative basis to the U.S. in terms of tech-based advances, economic growth and addressing broad societal needs. Wheeler discussed the proposition of his recent paper and described its key elements as well as analyzed the potential risks. During a fascinating and broad reaching moderated conversation, he explained how his proposition can become a reality at a practical level and what would be required from both a legislative as well as industry standpoint to preserve the dynamism of American capitalism while protecting the American consumer. Drawing on lessons learned from other regions of the world, he also shared his national vision for digital policy in the U.S. and his observations on how he sees the role of technology in addressing broader societal issues such as the COVID-19 pandemic. The conversation was moderated by Terry Kramer, adjunct professor and faculty director of the Easton Technology Management Center and Christine Loh, visiting professor and former minister in the Hong Kong SAR Government. The audience, which comprised over 200 current and admitted students as well as alumni, faculty, staff, members of the extended UCLA community and general public asked many though-provoking questions during the audience Q&A around changes needed to the U.S. structure of governing and regulating to meet the challenges and opportunities of big data and the responsibility of U.S.-based tech companies doing business in China. Wheeler shared his thoughts on innovation, leadership and public policy and provided an extremely insightful window into the tech world and his eye-opening proposal about how data should be used, who should own it and how it can create a competitive advantage for the U.S. amidst an increasingly competitive global landscape. The discussion was a collaboration with the UCLA Luskin Global Public Affairs, UCLA Samueli School of Engineering and the UCLA School of Law Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law & Policy.

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Wednesday, June 24, 2020 11:00 AM

A Livestream Conversation: The Institutional and Global Origins of Inequality on the African Continent

As many Americans have been grappling with racism, police brutality, and systemic inequality domestically, on Wednesday, June 24, the Los Angeles World Affairs Council & Town Hall and the World Trade Center Los Angeles hosted a virtual panel discussion to interrogate racism and racial inequality globally, specifically towards African nations. The conversation was led by Dr. Arikana Chihombori Quao, African Union Ambassador to the U.S. (2016-2019); Ben Murray-Bruce, former Nigerian Senator (2015-2019) and founder of the Silverbird Group; and Grant Harris, CEO of Harris Africa Partners and former senior director for African Affairs at the White House. Panelists discussed the unfair treatment of African Nations by corporations and international institutions. Unequal health outcomes in many African Nations from the COVID-19 pandemic, due to the unequal global allocation of health resources, is just one pressing example of present-day anti-blackness and the legacy of colonialism. The discussion focused on historic and contemporary examples of institutionalized racism towards the continent of Africa within global economic structures and business practices – as these are key modern drivers of anti-black racism and oppression. Senator Murray stated: “Rich people are dying. When rich people die, leaders pay attention to healthcare.” He added: “This is serious business, if we have a pandemic in Africa we will lose half our population….it’s not just a medical problem, it’s also an economic problem. The economy is as important as health.” The conversation was moderated by UCLA alumnus Stephen Cheung (BS ’00, MSW ’07), president of the WTCLA. The Center for Global Management is a member of the LAWAC & Town Hall and receives special invitations that allow students and faculty to attend its programming and join in the conversations – in-person and virtually. View the recording of the conversation on YouTube.

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Wednesday, June 17, 2020 11:00 AM

A Livestream Conversation Confronting Racism: A Pandemic Within A Pandemic

In the aftermath of the murder of George Floyd by a police officer in Minneapolis, the current moment in the United States has been described as, ‘A Pandemic Within a Pandemic.’ To speak to the recent tragic events and future solutions, on Wednesday, June 17, the Los Angeles World Affairs Council & Town Hall hosted a panel discussion with Los Angeles leaders who addressed the current national conversation on racism, police brutality, and criminal justice reform. They also addressed COVID-19’s disproportionate impact on racial and ethnic minorities and communities, touching on the medical, economic and cultural impact of the COVID-19 crisis — as the pandemic and subsequent shutdown have exposed and reinforced issues of racial and ethnic inequality, discrimination and barriers to healthcare and economic success. Panelists included Michael Lawson, president and CEO of the Los Angeles chapter of the Urban League (LAUL), one of the oldest and most respected civil rights organizations in the United States dedicated to providing economic empowerment, educational opportunities, and the guarantee of civil rights for underserved communities in the Los Angeles area; Helen Torres, president and CEO of Hispanas Organized for Political Equality (HOPE), a nonprofit focused on empowering communities through advocacy, Latina leadership training, and increasing knowledge on the contributions Latinas have made to advance the status of women; and UCLA alumnus Charlie Woo (B.S.’72, M.S. ’75), co-founder and CEO of Center for Asian Americans United for Self-Empowerment (CAUSE) a community-based organization with a mission to advance the political and civic empowerment of the Asian Pacific American (APA) community through nonpartisan voter outreach, training, and education as well as leadership development. The conversation was moderated by Dan Schnur, a professor and lecturer on politics at USC, UC-Berkeley and Pepperdine. Woo suggested: “While unemployment was at an all-time low pre-pandemic, these numbers don’t deliver the full picture. We need to look deeper at statistics, to make sure the ‘rising tide lifts all boats.’’ Torre suggested: " We are not all on the same boat. Some of us are on paddle boats, some canoes, some are on private yachts" and “As leaders we need to pick a place where we can really make a difference, but we also need to hold the whole system accountable.” A key objective of this program was to uplift the changes each respective community is advocating for, as well as the changes they hope to see within the wider Los Angeles community and U.S. to move the nation forward. The Center for Global Management is a member of the LAWAC & Town Hall and receives special invitations that allow students to attend its programming and join in the conversations – in-person and virtually. View the recording of the conversation on YouTube.

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Tuesday, June 2, 2020 5:00 – 6:30 PM

Virtual Dinner Discussion Special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series:
"COVID-19 and the Global Race for a Cure: Biotech and Technology Converge on Diagnostics and Treatments"

The recent FDA emergency use authorization of two emerging products - Roche's Elecsys® Anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibody test and Gilead's remdesivir, an antiviral medication that is the first medicine approved to treat COVID-19 - have propelled the world into the next stage of diagnostics and treatment. On Tuesday, June 2, the Center for Global Management (CGM) hosted its tenth virtual discussion in its Special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series that focused on the global race for a cure and how tech, therapeutics, and diagnostics are converging to address the impact of COVID-19. Jennifer McCaney, assistant professor, UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine and executive director of UCLA Biodesign moderated a fascinating, lively and productive conversation from a clinical, pharmaceutical, and technology perspective. The distinguished group of panelists included Dr. Tom Coates, director of the UC multi-campus Global Health Institute and distinguished research professor of medicine emeritus at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine; Dr. Alan Wright, chief medical officer at Roche Diagnostics; Dr. James Rooney, vice president of medical affairs at Gilead Sciences; and James Larus, dean of École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne who has been leading the development of the secure virus contact tracing technology, leveraged by Apple and Google for their mobile applications to help fight the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The discussion examined the origins of COVID-19 and the progress that has been made to understand and combat the novel coronavirus, as well as prevention and mitigation techniques. The recent FDA emergency use authorization of the two aforementioned emerging products have propelled the world into the next stage of diagnostics and treatment. In combination with scientific breakthroughs, the role of privacy preserving proximity tracing technology was also explored as it relates to integration and implementation across geographies and nations. In parallel with digital technologies, the required infrastructure to manufacture and distribute new COVID-19 therapies as it relates to care delivery, population health, and expectations on global landscape was also addressed. Panelists also analyzed key milestones of cumulative scientific and clinical efforts to mobilize a global response to COVID-19; drew scientific parallels with HIV; and discussed how digital technology has emerged as a critical piece of frontline efforts to scale traditional contact tracing across geographies and nations, while still maintaining personal protections of privacy. The audience, which comprised over 300 current and admitted students as well as alumni, faculty, staff, members of the extended UCLA and UC communities and general public asked many interesting questions during the audience Q&A that addressed the three key themes of the discussion: detection, diagnostics and treatment and the complex partnerships required in this fight. Panelists also shared their longer-term views on realistic expectations about when and how the world will reopen and what the effects of preventative measures will have on our post-COVID lives, as well as how the healthcare industry might fundamentally change. The discussion was a collaboration with UCLA Biodesign and the UCLA Anderson Healthcare Business Association. The CGM’s Special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series aims to engage the community in interactive dialogue around implications of the COVID-19 global pandemic that transcends borders. In this Series, through Zoom presentations and discussions open to the UCLA Anderson community: UCLA and Anderson faculty, alumni, board members and thought leaders share their perspectives on the critical business, policy and socioeconomic issues that affect us all. These are unprecedented times. UCLA Anderson’s Center for Global Management is committed to providing timely and relevant information about critical global topics and issues that matter to our community and the world.

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Tuesday, June 2, 2020 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM

Virtual Lunch Series with CGM Advisory Board Member and UCLA Anderson Alumnus Brent Nelson Smith (’86), on “Global Investment Banking and Entrepreneurship”

On Tuesday, June 2, the Center for Global Management (CGM) hosted a virtual lunchtime discussion with UCLA Anderson alumnus Brent Nelson Smith ('86), co-founder and managing partner, LevelOne Capital Limited and former global group head of corporate and investment banking at DBS Bank Ltd. Smith, an active and engaged member of the CGM’s advisory board has enjoyed a successful global career with over 30 years of experience across Asia, the U.S. and Australia where he has served in various roles from senior international manager to financial services executive to private investor and strategic advisor. Since 2008, he has served as co-founder and managing partner of LevelOne Capital Ltd., a pan-Asian investment and advisory firm, specialized in startup and mezzanine opportunities in emerging markets with a focus on southeast Asia, particularly Vietnam and Singapore. Smith formerly served as managing director and global group head of corporate and investment banking for DBS Bank, a Singaporean multinational bank and financial services company after spending almost 15 years with JPMorgan & Co., where he was a managing director in the investment banking and mergers and acquisitions groups, and completed assignments in New York, Melbourne, Sydney, Singapore and San Francisco. The luncheon provided an opportunity for interested MBA students to meet Smith in an informal, interactive and small virtual setting and hear his thoughts, insights and experiences. He discussed his career trajectory since graduating from UCLA Anderson in 1986, describing his transition from global investment banker to CFO to venture capitalist to entrepreneur; experience living, working and doing business internationally; the value of geographic diversity; and the importance of cultural sensitivity and international experiences in today’s environment and post COVID-19. He also provided valuable guidance and words of wisdom to students looking to career pivot in the current environment and addressed the importance of persistency and opening yourself up to your network. Smith shared many personal stories and experiences with the students, including mistakes made and lessons learned throughout his career and how he sees globalization changing. He also addressed the importance of family support and finding ways to give back to the community. The lunchtime discussion was organized by the Center for Global Management.

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Friday, May 29, 2020 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM

Virtual Lunchtime Discussion Special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series: “COVID-19 and Its Global Impact on Energy Markets and Clean Energy Adoption”

Despite the agreement between the United States, Russia and the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) to cut global oil production by 10%, crude futures have plunged. With government-imposed lockdowns, demand for oil is collapsing and despite production cuts, the world is running out of places to store the excess oil. Oil infrastructure is also highly complicated and it will be difficult to quickly fix the problems. On Friday, May 29, the Center for Global Management (CGM) hosted its ninth virtual discussion in its Special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series in collaboration with the UCLA Anderson Forecast and Energy Management Group. Professor Jerry Nickelsburg, director of the UCLA Anderson Forecast moderated a fascinating and extremely informative discussion with Agnia Grigas, an energy economist and political scientist and senior fellow at the Atlantic Council in Washington D.C.; Tom Georgis (’98), a renewable energy expert and former CEO of SolarReserve; and Jason Lee (’07), lecturer at UCLA Anderson and managing director at Oaktree Capital Management where he is focused on investments in the energy sector. Panelists, who really complemented each other covered a broad range of issues. They examined how COVID-19 and geopolitical forces have contributed to the plunge in oil prices and energy market shifts and shared their longer term views on the potential effects of the OPEC+ agreement; and how cheap oil could influence the global economic recovery, trajectory of clean energy adoption and the carbon economy. They also addressed renewables both in the U.S. as well as in India and China, the intervention of policymakers and shared thoughts on how the green investment boom – including commitments by governments and businesses to combat global climate change – might be impacted by COVID-19 and changes in fossil fuel prices. The audience, which comprised over 120 current, prospective and admitted students as well as alumni, faculty, staff and members of the UCLA community, asked many interesting questions during the audience Q&A that addressed emerging markets, renewables and infrastructure risk. Panelists also encouraged graduating MBAs to look at the energy sector for career opportunities. It is a very interesting, dynamic and fast changing field that combines broader perspective on economics, business, politics and policy and the local, national and global level and provides a broad gamut of opportunity. The CGM’s Special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series aims to engage the community in interactive dialogue around implications of the COVID-19 global pandemic that transcends borders. In this Series, through Zoom presentations and discussions open to the UCLA Anderson community: UCLA and Anderson faculty, alumni, board members and thought leaders share their perspectives on the critical business, policy and socioeconomic issues that affect us all. These are unprecedented times. UCLA Anderson’s Center for Global Management is committed to providing timely and relevant information about critical global topics and issues that matter to our community and the world.

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Wednesday, May 27, 2020 5:00 – 6:00 PM

Virtual Dinner Discussion Special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series: “Helicopter Money and COVID-19”

Authorities around the world are considering various strategies to combat the economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. One strategy that has been discussed is “ Helicopter Money. ” The term is named after economist Milton Friedman conducted a thought experiment in the late 1960s about what would happen if the government dropped dollar bills from the sky. Helicopter Money is related to Modern Monetary Theory (MMT), a policy supported by progressives, including Congresswoman Alexandra Ocasio-Cortez and Senator Bernie Sanders. According to MMT central banks should print large amounts of money, and give it to governments. This would directly expand aggregate demand and employment. There would be no need to raise taxes either now or in the future, the argument goes. Moreover, large increases in government debt wouldn’t matter. On Wednesday, May 27, the Center for Global Management (CGM) hosted its eighth virtual discussion in its Special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series. This time, roles were reversed and Sebastian Edwards, distinguished professor of economics and Henry Ford II Chair in International Management who has typically served as the moderator for discussions in this Series was the guest speaker. He dissected these policy proposals and analyzed their pros and cons as well as their promises and dangers. He also discussed whether doing something along these lines is unavoidable. During an extremely informative presentation, Edwards explained the concept of “Helicopter Money” and how it relates to MMT and examined whether we are already in the path to “Helicopter Money.” He addressed the likely consequences of this kind of policy and looked at inflation, interest rates, valuations and the U.S. dollar. He also reviewed MMT-like policies in Latin America and explained velocity and inflation in Brazil as well as the velocity of money in Chile. Following his presentation, Professor Ed Leamer joined Edwards and moderated a discussion to dig deeper into some of the theories and issues raised. The audience, which comprised over 200 students, alumni, faculty, staff and members of the UCLA community, posed many interesting questions around the issues raised on both a U.S. and global level to further understand inflation, the U.S. debt to GDP ratio as well as the global economic situation and approaches employed in other countries/regions of the world from Chile to Japan to the EU. The CGM’s Special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series aims to engage the community in interactive dialogue around implications of the COVID-19 global pandemic that transcends borders. In this Series, through Zoom presentations and discussions open to the UCLA Anderson community: UCLA and Anderson faculty, alumni, board members and thought leaders share their perspectives on the critical business, policy and socioeconomic issues that affect us all. These are unprecedented times. UCLA Anderson’s Center for Global Management is committed to providing timely and relevant information about critical global topics and issues that matter to our community and the world.

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Wednesday, May 20, 2020 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM

Virtual Lunch Series with UCLA Anderson Alumni Alceu Lima ('92) and Marcos de Callis ('92) on “Business and Investment Challenges in Brazil, Latin America and Globally”

On Wednesday, May 20, the Center for Global Management and the Latin American Business Association hosted a virtual lunchtime discussion with two distinguished UCLA Anderson alumni and classmates based in Brazil: Alceu Lima (’92), investor, owner and former president of Barclays Brazil and Marcos de Callis (’92), partner of Hieron Asset Management and Family Office. The luncheon provided an opportunity for interested MBA students to meet with Lima and de Callis in an informal and interactive setting and hear about their successful career trajectories post-Anderson. They also shared their thoughts on the challenges that businesses in Brazil, across the Latin American region, and globally will face in the short and longer-term as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Around 30 students from the full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs, including members of LABA and the Investment Finance Association and students who were scheduled to visit Brazil in March for the CGM’s global immersion course joined the interactive lunchtime session. Students posed many interesting questions to hear the experiences, wisdom and insights of Lima and de Callis. Topics included Brazil’s economy and its reaction to the pandemic, how the outbreak is performing differently across various states and across the region, implications on the Brazilian real, and what the post COVID-19 world might look like. Lima spent over 30 years in investment banking with Barclays, Lehman Brothers and Citibank (where he started his career) with significant experience in the Latin America region originating and executing M&A, advisory, equity and debt market transactions for clients in telecom, utilities, financial services, and oil and gas. De Callis began his career in 1987 at Citibank where he worked until 1995. He has held senior positions, including managing superintendent of Votorantim Asset, investment director of Schroders Brasil and HSBC AM Brasil, and vice president of Itaú Corretora. The lunch, organized by the Latin American Business Association in partnership with the Center for Global Management, was supported by the Investment Finance Association.

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Monday, May 18, 2020 11:30 AM – 12.30 PM

Virtual Lunchtime Discussion Special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series: “Political Economy Aspects of the COVID-19 Pandemic”

The COVID-19 pandemic will affect every aspect of global society and civilization. While the epidemiological aspects and the economic consequences of the pandemic have been frequently discussed, there has been much less attention paid to the broader social and political effects of COVID-19. How will this momentous event affect the future of globalization, the march of democracy, the incidence of global and local conflicts, and the current realignment of the axes of politics? Shedding light on these complex issues requires a multidisciplinary approach to draw out the lessons of history while remaining sensitive to the specificities of the current situation. On Monday, May 18, the Center for Global Management (CGM) hosted its seventh virtual discussion in its Special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series with Romain Wacziarg, professor of economics and Hans Hufschmid Chair in Management. Wacziarg borrowed insights from economics, political science and history to analyze the broader effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. He examined the possible impact of the pandemic on U.S.-China relations and electoral outcomes in the U.S. and shared his analysis on the implications for management practices and business opportunities around the world. During a fascinating presentation, Wacziarg analyzed many global issues relating to the pandemic, including retrenchment, democracy, global and local conflict, inequality and poverty as well as government size and suggested that the pandemic comes on the heels of global trends that were already long in the making, and it may exacerbate these trends. He then addressed U.S. politics and the pandemic, including areas such as social conflict and antagonism and suggested that we are seeing political fault lines appear regarding attitudes to the lockdowns and that the pandemic may not be a great uniter, but instead a great divider. He also examined the lockdowns and Trump’s reelection chances. Wacziarg concluded with some key takeaways and suggested that the COVID-19 pandemic will reinforce existing trends of retrenchment from globalization and democracy, rising inequality, populism, and geopolitical uncertainty; and while the economic fallout will hurt incumbents, they will also find ways to exploit aspects of the crisis to their advantage. The big unknown is how long it will take to “get back to normal” after the health threat subsides. Following his presentation, Wacziarg continued the discussion on these topics with Professor Sebastian Edwards. The audience, which comprised over 200 students, alumni, faculty, staff and members of the UCLA community, posed many interesting questions through Slido, the audience interactive tool relating to the issues that his presentation addressed as well as the future of regional trading blocs, politics and gender and the attitudes of the big three players, namely the U.S., China and EU. The CGM’s Special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series aims to engage the community in interactive dialogue around implications of the COVID-19 global pandemic that transcends borders. In this Series, through Zoom presentations and discussions open to the UCLA Anderson community: UCLA and Anderson faculty, alumni, board members and thought leaders share their perspectives on the critical business, policy and socioeconomic issues that affect us all. These are unprecedented times. UCLA Anderson’s Center for Global Management is committed to providing timely and relevant information about critical global topics and issues that matter to our community and the world.

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Tuesday, May 12, 2020 11:00 AM

A Livestream Conversation: Author Jim Newton, in Conversation with Jerry Brown, Former Governor of California

On Tuesday, May 12, Jim Newton, author of the new biography “Man of Tomorrow: The Relentless Life of Jerry Brown," sat down with Jerry Brown, former Governor of California for a discussion on his political career and a commentary on protecting the nation’s health and reestablishing its economy during the COVID-19 pandemic. This discussion was produced by the Los Angeles World Affairs Council & Town Hall and WritersBloc Presents Governor Brown also addressed his life governing California, what he learned, what he wished he could have done differently, and advice he has for U.S. Governors now facing the toughest decisions of their political careers. He took questions from livestream participants during the audience Q&A.

While urging everyone that is infected to self-isolate in an effort to curb the spread of the disease, Brown also referenced FDR's New Deal package, which was implemented after The Great Depression, as something similar that could offer a possible means of relief and economic improvement in our current time. He suggested an immediate launch of ambitious infrastructure projects that included reopening hospitals, bringing internet access to rural areas, and building roads & railways, all of which could be staffed through a jobs program that would provide employment to the unemployed.

Looking ahead to the 2020 election, Brown criticized the Trump administration for its response to the COVID-19 pandemic, stating that in his opinion, another four years with the same President would make the situation worse and would lead to a further divided populace. Brown, a longtime Democrat and former Presidential candidate, predicted however that an era of greater national unity lied ahead; as long as the left and right could find compromise on opposing issues. He also spoke about finding a better way to finance higher education in California and how to combat climate change. As the program closed, when asked about fielding a myriad of other global threats, Brown stated: “Life — just to be here and be part of it — is quite a lot. So to worry, to think about down the road how it’s going to turn out? That’s fortune telling. That’s ouija board stuff. Do what you can do in the moment that you have. And God will take care of the rest.”

In his new book, "Man of Tomorrow: The Relentless Life of Jerry Brown," award-winning journalist and bestselling author Jim Newton explores the unconventional arc of Brown’s career: In addition to being the longest serving governor in California history, Brown was a three-time Presidential candidate, a two-term Mayor of Oakland, and the California Attorney General. Newton reveals the complex and often contradictory nature of Jerry Brown’s personality and politics– and how Brown’s leadership stood up to the Trump White House policies on climate change, immigration, and more. Brilliant and sometimes unpredictable, with a steadfast drive to advance a thriving and equitable California, Jerry Brown is a leader whose policies have defined California as the international economic stronghold it has become, as well as a national example of what progressive politics can accomplish.

The Center for Global Management is a member of the LAWAC & Town Hall and receives special invitations that allow students to attend its programming
in-person and virtually.

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Monday, May 11, 2020 5:00 – 6:00 PM

Virtual Dinner Discussion Special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series:
“A Rethink on the Global Supply Chain in the Midst of the COVID-19 Pandemic”

As a nation of plenty, Americans are in shock when state governors are pleading the federal government for a greater allocation of emergency stockpiles, and medical professionals are appealing for donations of personal protective equipment (PPE) such as face masks and gloves. While the COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the world’s risky dependence on vulnerable nodes in global supply chains, it has also cast a spotlight on companies that already have flexible production lines. Nimble luxury goods manufacturers in Europe overhauled operations and turned their supply chains to masks and gowns; LVMH’s perfume factories were producing hand sanitizer; and makers of cars and planes started to assemble ventilators and other equipment. Flexible supply chains have played a critical role, including rapid raw material sourcing, product design, development and testing, and distribution. On Monday, May 11, the Center for Global Management (CGM) hosted its sixth virtual discussion in its Special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series with Chris Tang, distinguished professor and Edward W. Carter Chair in Business Administration and a highly respected authority on global supply chains. Tang explored the root causes to the shortage of PPE in the United States and addressed the current response. He also examined what we can learn from the current crisis and explored whether COVID-19 will be the catalyst that forces many companies, and entire industries, to rethink their global supply chain strategy and manage it in a more resilient manner. Tang also shared his longer term view on whether post COVID-19 local resilience will be prized over global efficiency. Following an extremely engaging and thought-provoking presentation with numerous timely and relevant global examples, Tang continued the conversation with Professor Sebastian Edwards and answered many thoughtful and pertinent questions from an engaged audience which comprised over 500 students, alumni, faculty, staff and members of the extended UCLA and global community. He addressed reshoring and supply chain financing and shared some key ideas for managing supply chain risk including innovations in advanced robotics, 3D printing and blockchain; the role of government and regulations for mission critical products; and the importance of supply chain transparency and identifying, accessing and mitigating supply chain risks. Tang has conducted research on global supply chain for over 30 years and has co-written a book on “Supply Chain Risk Management” and published over 100 articles on this subject. The CGM’s Special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series aims to engage the community in interactive dialogue around implications of the COVID-19 global pandemic that transcends borders. In this Series, through Zoom presentations and discussions open to the UCLA Anderson community: UCLA and Anderson faculty, alumni, board members and thought leaders share their perspectives on the critical business, policy and socioeconomic issues that affect us all. These are unprecedented times. UCLA Anderson’s Center for Global Management is committed to providing timely and relevant information about critical global topics and issues that matter to our community and the world.

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Wednesday, May 6, 2020 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM

Virtual Lunchtime Discussion Special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series: “Lessons from COVID-19: Making Decisions Under Entirely New Circumstances”

Are we in the midst of a global recession? How severe will it be and how long-lasting?What comes next: a return to “normal” or a very different global economy?
Professor Frank Knight published a book in 1921 contrasting decision-making with known probabilities and decision-making with unknown probabilities, what he referred to as “risk and uncertainty.” In a repetitive situation, a study of historical data can inform you of the probabilities, such as using the historical batting averages to choose the pinch-hitter. The government-imposed shutdowns in response to COVID-19 are entirely unprecedented and render automatic reliance on historical data very unwise. How then can we possibly answer the recession questions given the huge amount of risk and uncertainty? On Wednesday, May 6, the Center for Global Management hosted its fifth virtual discussion in its Special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series to stretch our minds during this period of quiescence. Ed Leamer, distinguished professor, economist and Chauncey J. Medberry Chair in Management Emeritus demonstrated the wisdom of exploratory data analysis with a study of COVID-19 across California’s 58 counties. He examined how much population density contributes to the COVID-19 incidence and what control variables might be employed. He used this context to comment on the statistical theory that MBAs have been taught for settings of known probabilities and the role of machine learning in the settings of unknown probabilities. Leamer also shared his predictions on what will come next and the possible implications for business, investment and the consumer as well as his longer-term view on the global economy and what the new “normal” might look like. Following a fascinating presentation, Leamer continued the conversation with Professor Sebastian Edwards and addressed unemployment, U.S. debt, the Dow Jones, housing markets, education, healthcare and travel, among other areas. He also raised the question of how a pandemic can change society and we should be thinking like a large family would and value not the material success of our family members, but instead how much they contribute to our community. He added, we need a new America where everyone is happy and proud. Now is the time to decide: Should we continue to separate or should we unite? The discussion was co-sponsored by the UCLA Anderson Forecast. Around 300 students, alumni, board members, faculty, staff and members of the extended UCLA community and general public gathered virtually for the fifth event in the CGM’s Special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series that aims to engage the community in interactive dialogue around implications of the COVID-19 global pandemic that transcends borders. In this Series, through Zoom presentations and discussions open to the UCLA Anderson community: UCLA and Anderson faculty, alumni, board members and thought leaders share their perspectives on the critical business, policy and socioeconomic issues that affect us all. These are unprecedented times. UCLA Anderson’s Center for Global Management is committed to providing timely and relevant information about critical global topics and issues that matter to our community and the world.

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Tuesday, April 28, 2020 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM

Virtual Lunchtime Discussion Special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series: “COVID-19 and the Corporate Debt Crisis”

COVID-19 has caused significant disruption in economic activity and surges in volatility in financial markets across the globe. The pandemic also arrived against a backdrop of private sector indebtedness. Corporate leverage is at an all-time high and almost half of all U.S. corporate bonds maturing in the next five years are below investment grade. Policymakers have responded by deploying a variety of measures aimed at stabilizing markets in an effort to avoid a full-blown financial crisis. Current policies will inevitably leave parts of the corporate sector with even larger debt burdens, threatening economic recovery after COVID-19. On Tuesday, April 28, the Center for Global Management hosted the fourth virtual discussion in its Special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series, co-sponsored by the UCLA Anderson Laurence & Lori Fink Center for Finance. This particular discussion looked at COVID-19 and the corporate debt crisis. Mark Garmaise, professor of finance, who studies corporate finance, venture capital and private equity discussed the dynamics of the bond markets during the ongoing pandemic and analyzed the effects of policymakers’ interventions. He explored the particular forces at work in the leveraged loan and private-equity-backed debt markets and also shared his longer-term views on the likely evolution of debt contracting and the possible role for policy reforms. During his presentation, Garmaise also polled the audience and posed a number of questions to solicit thoughts and opinions on issues such as whether rate cuts and asset purchases look like just another Wall Street bank bailout? During a moderated conversation with Professor Sebastian Edwards, the discussion continued and addressed the role of rating agencies, government bailouts, debt equity swaps, the role of the Fed, as well as other questions that were top of mind of the audience. Garmaise is an award-winning instructor and highly respected authority on finance, venture capital and private equity. He teaches the core corporate finance course and an elective on venture capital and private equity and has been recognized with numerous awards and has published in numerous journals, including the Review of Financial Studies, the Journal of Finance and the Quarterly Journal of Economics. Around 300 students, alumni, board members, faculty and staff gathered virtually for the fourth event in the CGM’s special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series that aims to engage the community in interactive dialogue around implications of the COVID-19 global pandemic that transcends borders. In this Series, through Zoom presentations and discussions open to the UCLA Anderson community: UCLA and Anderson faculty, alumni, board members and thought leaders will share their perspectives on the critical business, policy and socioeconomic issues that affect us all. These are unprecedented times. UCLA Anderson’s Center for Global Management is committed to providing timely and relevant information about critical global topics and issues that matter to our community and the world. Video is private content and will be available to UCLA Anderson students. For more information, please contact global@anderson.ucla.edu.

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Wednesday, April 22, 2020 5:00 – 6:00 PM

Virtual Dinner Discussion Special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series:
“The Pandemic and the Emerging Markets: A View from Wall Street”

Emerging markets are battling a financial crisis as well as a public-health emergency, scrambling to keep their economies afloat as the COVID-19 pandemic deepens. Over 90 countries have approached the IMF for assistance. While many emerging-market economies are in more solid footing than during previous global financial crises, the macro economic outlook remains uncertain given the magnitude of the ongoing shocks. On Wednesday, April 22, the Center for Global Management hosted the third virtual discussion in its Special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series, co-sponsored by the UCLA Anderson Laurence & Lori Fink Center for Finance. The discussion focused on the pandemic and the emerging markets - a view from Wall Street with special guest Fernando Losada (MA ’92, Ph.D. ’95), Managing Director and Head of Emerging Markets Research, Oppenheimer & Co. Inc. where he works with institutional investors and supports the sales, trading and debt capital markets efforts. Losada discussed how institutional investors are thinking about their exposure to operational disruptions and extreme market dynamics as a result of the pandemic. He examined the various policy responses observed across emerging economies, with a focus on the provision of liquidity under the emergency situation, and analyzed possible outcomes of those strategies. During his presentation, he also addressed the collapse in commodity prices and explained how this time is different than previous crises. He also looked at the role of multilateral agencies, considered whether debt standstill is realistic, and addressed the role of China and the political dimension of the crisis in emerging markets. Following an extremely insightful presentation, Professor Sebastian Edwards moderated a conversation with Losada where question went deeper in to specific countries such as Brazil, Mexico, Peru and Colombia. Over 200 enrolled and recently admitted students, alumni, board members, faculty and staff gathered virtually for the third event in the CGM’s special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series that aims to engage the community in interactive dialogue around implications of the COVID-19 global pandemic that transcends borders. In this Series, through Zoom presentations and discussions open to the UCLA Anderson community: UCLA and Anderson faculty, alumni, board members and thought leaders will share their perspectives on the critical business, policy and socioeconomic issues that affect us all. These are unprecedented times. UCLA Anderson’s Center for Global Management is committed to providing timely and relevant information about critical global topics and issues that matter to our community and the world. Video is private content and will be available to UCLA Anderson students. For more information, please contact global@anderson.ucla.edu.

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Wednesday, April 15, 2020 5:00 – 6:00 PM

Virtual Dinner Discussion Special World Today Discussion Series: “Managing A Large Multi-Dollar Global Portfolio Amid COVID-19 Volatility” – The Perspective of a Chief Investment Officer

The COVID-19 pandemic – and the global response to it – is a serious threat not only to global health, but to communities, economies and investments. Institutional investors and other private fund investors are considering the economic exposure to their investments from operational disruptions as a result of the pandemic. On Wednesday, April 15, the Center for Global Management (CGM) hosted the second virtual discussion in its Special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series. The topic of the second session that was co-sponsored by the UCLA Anderson Laurence & Lori Fink Center for Finance looked at managing a large multi-billion-dollar global portfolio amid COVID-19 volatility. CGM’s board chair Craig Ehrlich (B.A. ’78), chair-elect of the UCLA Foundation moderated the informative and insightful discussion with Justin Barton, president and chief investment officer of the UCLA Investment Company, responsible for the management of the UCLA Foundation’s ~$2.5 billion endowment fund - a global, multi-asset portfolio. Along with the Investment Company team, Barton oversees all aspects of the endowment including executing investment strategy, portfolio construction, and governance. Balancing the right number of relationships to create a global, multi-asset class portfolio that is not overly diversified is a persistent challenge in normal times. Barton addressed the key issues faced by institutional investors amid COVID-19 volatility. He examined what institutional investors should focus on with respect to internal governance; and addressed topics ranging from ESG to alternative investments and digital assets as well as legal issues brought on by this public health challenge. He also identified some of the elements that make for successful long-term investment partnerships during this highly complex environment and shared his longer-term view on the crisis and the broader questions it raises on how our financial system is structured to respond to such threats. Over 200 enrolled and recently admitted students, alumni, board members, faculty and staff gathered virtually for the second event in the CGM’s special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series that aims to engage the community in interactive dialogue around implications of the COVID-19 global pandemic that transcends borders. In this Series, through Zoom presentations and discussions open to the UCLA Anderson community: UCLA and Anderson faculty, alumni, board members and thought leaders will share their perspectives on the critical business, policy and socioeconomic issues that affect us all. These are unprecedented times. UCLA Anderson’s Center for Global Management is committed to providing timely and relevant information about critical global topics and issues that matter to our community and the world. Video is private content and will be available to UCLA Anderson students. For more information, please contact global@anderson.ucla.edu.

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Tuesday, April 7, 2020 5:00 – 6:30 PM

Virtual Dinner Discussion Special World Today Discussion Series: “COVID-19 and Its Global Impact” – A continuation of the discussion from a socio-economic and public health perspective

On Tuesday, April 7, the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management (CGM) hosted a virtual dinner discussion in collaboration with the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. As a follow up to the discussion on February 25th ( watch video), UCLA Anderson visiting professor and former minister in the Hong Kong SAR Government Christine Loh and Dr. Robert Kim-Farley who holds joint appointments in the departments of epidemiology and community health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health gathered virtually to continue the conversation on the COVID-19 pandemic and its global impact from a socio-economic, business and public health perspective. The discussion was moderated by Professor Sebastian Edwards, CGM faculty director. UCLA Anderson’s Dean Bernardo and UCLA Fielding’s Dean Brookmeyer provided opening remarks.

While there is little certainty on what will happen next and when the virus will be contained, panelists addressed the broader issues surrounding the pandemic. They examined how the role of governments has expanded to deal with the virus; how COVID-19 could devastate many economies; and how the public health community is responding locally and globally. They also shared their longer term views on what the economic impact will be for the United States and globally and sought to explain how COVID-19 will not only have lasting effects on society and people’s behavior, but it will also alter the structure of global business. The interdisciplinary nature of the conversation was a further demonstration of academia's relevance to real-world problems. Over 400 students, alumni, board members, faculty, staff and members of the extended UCLA community and general public gathered virtually for the inaugural event in the special COVID-19 World Today Discussion Series that aims to engage the community in interactive dialogue around implications of the COVID-19 global pandemic that transcends borders. In this Series, through Zoom presentations and discussions open to the UCLA Anderson community: UCLA and Anderson faculty, alumni, board members and thought leaders will share their perspectives on the critical business, policy and socioeconomic issues that affect us all. These are unprecedented times. UCLA Anderson’s Center for Global Management is committed to providing timely and relevant information about critical global topics and issues that matter to our community and the world. This event was in recognition of the Wilbur K. Woo Greater China Business Conference, UCLA's largest conference focused on China. Due to the coronavirus outbreak, this year's conference which was to explore timely issues of technology transformation in China, and was scheduled to have taken place in April, was postponed. Our thoughts continue to be with people around the world who have been adversely affected by this pandemic.

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Friday, February 28, 2020 5:30 – 6:30 PM

Global Management Lecture Series on “Observations of the Technology-Based Transformations in Shenzhen and Hong Kong and Importance of Non-Market Risks,” with Christine Loh, Visiting Professor, UCLA Anderson School of Management

A notable technology-driven transformation is happening in China, with Shenzhen being the national frontrunner. The national plan is for the Greater Bay Area (that includes Shenzhen and Hong Kong) to stimulate development towards 2035 so that the region can rival Silicon Valley. This transformation has been enabled by government policy, availability of capital, pace of adoption and enterprise-driven innovation, changes in consumer preference and the Chinese consumers’ willingness to share data and try new services. The role of technology also is driving notable impact for societies, enterprises and individuals. Non-market risks – political risk being a major one – can be highly disruptive. The ability to understand the politics of a place and its culture is helpful to assessing risk and making decisions. Are China’s “successes” replicable in other countries? What are the key enablers and what do leaders need to understand to succeed in this complex, ever-shifting landscape? On Friday, February 29, the Center for Global Management (CGM) and Professor Terry Kramer hosted Christine Loh, visiting professor and former minister of the Hong Kong S.A.R. government, who shared her own observations of transformations in Shenzhen and Hong Kong and how they look different from those in the United States. She addressed topics such as rising income, Chinese consumer insights, the unique role of government and the economy of Hong Kong vis-à-vis Shenzhen and the surrounding region and also tied in non-market risks to highlight that just applying pure economic analysis of markets is not sufficient. This discussion took place at the beginning of Professor Terry Kramer’s class on “A Technology Driven Transformation of Society, Enterprises and Consumers,” a course held in lieu of the CGM’s Global Immersion course with the same name that was scheduled to travel to Shenzhen and Hong Kong over spring break. Interested students not enrolled in the course were also invited to attend. Loh served as the undersecretary for the environment in the Hong Kong S.A.R. Government from 2012 to 2017. Her direct policy responsibilities included air quality, energy, climate change and biodiversity. She worked with her Mainland Chinese counterparts to define new policies to control shipping emissions, an area of work she pioneered prior to joining the HKSAR Government, which has changed China’s national policy in this area. She created new dialogue platforms between the government and business sectors in order to strengthen Hong Kong’s capacity to meet the challenge of climate change. She currently serves as chief development strategist at the Institute for the Environment at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, as well as adjunct professor at the Division of Environment and Sustainability. In the 2018, 2019 and 2020 winter quarters, Loh has been teaching a course at UCLA Anderson on “Non-Market Risks and understanding Politics: The Global Context for Doing Business.”

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Wednesday, February 26, 2020, at 6:30 PM – 9:00 PM , Grand Salon, Marion Anderson Hall, UCLA Anderson

Global Business and Policy Forum “Wealth Taxes: Good Idea or False Promise”?

Senators Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders have both proposed ambitious wealth taxes as part of a plan to reduce inequality in the United States. These taxes will take from the very rich and use the revenue to support government programs for those at the bottom and middle of the income distribution. While the U.S. is considering adopting wealth taxes, most of the rest of the world have repealed them. On Wednesday, February 26, the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management and UCLA School of Law’s Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy hosted its second global business and policy forum of the academic year with Eric Zolt, Michael H. Schill Distinguished Professor of Law Emeritus. Zolt provided an examination of the arguments for and against a wealth tax, the likely revenue and economic consequences, and the administrative challenges of taxing the very wealthy. Following an extremely informative presentation on this very timely topic, Joel Feuer, executive director for the Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy and a professor from practice moderated a conversation with students from both schools. Over dinner, there were many interactive table conversations where specific questions were discussed among students, including: Should the U.S. adopt a wealth tax? Is the wealth tax the best way to tax the uber-wealthy? Students were also asked to comment on if the goal is to reduce income and wealth inequality, which would be more effective: to impose wealth taxes and use proceeds for social spending programs or adopt less progressive (or regressive) taxes and use proceeds to fund even larger social programs? Eric M. Zolt is the Michael H. Schill Distinguished Professor of Law Emeritus at the UCLA School of Law. He specializes in individual, corporate, and international tax law. Working with the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, U.S. AID and the U.S. Treasury Department, Zolt has served as a consultant on tax policy matters in over 30 countries. The discussion which was held in the Grand Salon of the new Marion Anderson Hall engaged around 80 students and faculty from the UCLA Anderson School of Management and the UCLA School of Law. The Global Business and Policy Forum is a collaborative partnership between UCLA Anderson’s Center for Global Management and the UCLA School of Law's Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy.

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Tuesday, February 25, 2020, 11:30 AM – 1:00 PM, Crown Family Auditorium, Marion Anderson Hall, UCLA Anderson

World Today Discussion Series on the “Coronavirus and Its Global Impact”

Originating in Wuhan, China, the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak has grown into the country's largest public health crisis since the struggle to contain SARS in 2002/03. Respiratory infections, know no borders and since its initial identification in China just two months ago, the outbreak has grown exponentially, making a significant impact on health, trade, travel and the global economy. In the decade and a half since the SARS crisis, China has made great strides in public health. One crucial difference is the country’s importance for the rest of the world. In 2003, China generated 4% of global GDP. Last year, it was 16%. Disruption in China, the world’s second-biggest economy, has global consequences. While growth slowed sharply at the height of the SARS epidemic, it rebounded swiftly after it was contained. The World Bank has estimated that as much as 90% of the economic damage from epidemics stems from people’s fear of associating with others, which leads factories, offices and stores to close and results on a drag on consumption. While public-health experts debate whether this is the right approach, economists will count the costs. What happens next will depend on how quickly the virus can be contained. But there is much uncertainty about when that might be.

On Tuesday, February 25, the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management hosted a lunchtime discussion in collaboration with the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health with UCLA Anderson visiting professor and former minister in the Hong Kong SAR Government Christine Loh, economist William Yu and Dr. Robert Kim-Farley who holds joint appointments in the departments of epidemiology and community health sciences at the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. They discussed the coronavirus and its global impact from a socio-economic, business and public health perspective. While there is little certainty on what will happen next and when the virus will be contained, panelists addressed the broader issues surrounding the outbreak, identified comparisons with and lessons learned from other epidemics and explained why these outbreaks are so difficult to predict and prepare for, and how the public health community can best respond. They also shared their longer term views and addressed what the economic impact could be for the United States and globally. The discussion was moderated by Sebastian Edwards, Henry Ford II Chair in International Management. UCLA Anderson’s Dean Bernardo provided opening remarks. The recently opened Crown Family Auditorium was packed with faculty, students and staff from both the UCLA Anderson School of Management and the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health. Students from the UCLA School of Law and UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs were also invited to attend. The conversation was a vivid demonstration of academia's relevance to real-world problems and the attendance and questioning reflected the audience's interest and engagement. This event was in recognition of the Wilbur K. Woo Greater China Business Conference, UCLA's largest conference focused on China. Due to the coronavirus outbreak, this year's conference which was to explore timely issues of technology transformation in China, and was scheduled to have taken place in April, was postponed. Our thoughts are with the people of China and around the world who have been adversely affected by this outbreak.

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Thursday, February 20, 2020 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM Executive Dining Room

Lunch Series on “Innovation, Autonomous Vehicles and Purpose: Insights from inside Israel: the Start-Up Nation,“ with Mois Navon (B.S. ’85), Founding Engineer, Mobileye

On Thursday, February 20, the Center for Global Management welcomed to campus UCLA alumnus Mois Navon (B.S. ’85), one of the founding engineers of Mobileye, the global leader in the development of vision technology for Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) and autonomous driving. From surfing the beaches of California - as a UCLA undergraduate student studying computer engineering - to designing Mobileye’s System on a Chip, powering the autonomous vehicle revolution, Navon shared how he has charted a course driven by passion and purpose, bringing inspiration to people of all walks of life. The lunchtime presentation provided an opportunity for interested students across the full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs as well as faculty members to hear from Navon about both the Mobileye story as well as his own personal journey. At Mobileye, Navon designed the EyeQ Family of SoC (System on a Chip) – the chip powering the autonomous vehicle revolution. Prior to Mobileye, he worked for notable companies such as IBM and NASA’s JPL, as well as a number of Israeli start-ups. He also is the author of numerous hardware patents in the field of image processing and computing hardware. While he is an engineer by profession, Navon is a rabbi by passion and currently pursuing his Ph.D. at the Department of Jewish Philosophy at Bar Ilan University where his thesis seeks to apply Jewish philosophy to address the ethical questions arising in the field of artificial intelligence. Professor Stuart Gabriel, Arden Realty Chair who leads the Center for Global Management’s global immersion course to Israel provided introductory remarks. In March, 40 students from across UCLA Anderson’s four MBA programs will be traveling to Tel Aviv and Jerusalem for the in-country component of the global immersion course focused on “The Start-Up Nation: Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Sustainability.” Navon will also be presenting to the students on their first day in Tel Aviv. The lunch, organized by the Center for Global Management was supported by the Jewish Business Student Association, Entrepreneur Association and Tech Business Association at Anderson.

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Thursday, January 30 – Thursday, February 20, 2020

UCLA Anderson 2020 International Film Festival

The Anderson International Film Festival (AIFF) celebrates diversity at UCLA Anderson through film. The third annual AIFF which began on January 30 and ran through February 20 was presented by the school’s Entertainment Management Association (EMA). UCLA Anderson identity clubs were asked to select a movie that would provide classmates with some insight on their region, culture or identity. The AIFF engaged twelve UCLA Anderson identity clubs and this year, including Out@Anderson for the first time. During the festival, a movie was screened each Monday through Thursday evening. In total, twelve movies and documentaries were screened from the home countries of many students, including films from Mexico, China, Germany, India, South Korea, Japan and the United States. Each screening was followed by a Q&A session facilitated by first and second year full-time MBA students from that particular country who were leaders of the sponsoring student club. These students led conversations around topics that the film addressed and issues that the film raised. Local cuisine from the country/region was also served. One example of a film that was screened included “shoplifters”, which won the palme d’or in 2018, sponsored by the Japan America Business Association (JABA). Hiroyuki Tochigi (’20), Takuto Saito (‘21) and Kevin Tente (’20) led the discussion following the movie. They provided some insight and highlighted some subtleties that a non-Japanese audience could have missed.

Over 140 students from across UCLA Anderson’s full-time and fully employed MBA programs registered through CampusGroups to attend the screenings with some students attending more than one screening. UCLA undergraduate students as well as Anderson Ph.D. students also joined screenings. Many students who attended felt that they had gained a better understanding of the country and culture as a result of attending the screening and participating in the conversation. The festival was presented by the UCLA Anderson Entertainment Management Association and was sponsored by the Center for Global Management, the Anderson Office of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion, the Center for MEMES and the International Business Association.

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Wednesday, February 12, 2020

Center for Global Management Mentor Program Gathering with Past and Present Mentees at Wolfgang Puck, Ackerman Union

On Wednesday, February 12, 2020, 2018-19 mentees shared experiences and networked with 2019-20 mentees at an early dinner gathering at the Wolfgang Puck restaurant, Ackerman Union located in the heart of the UCLA campus. The CGM mentor program connects current full-time MBA, FEMBA, EMBA and UCLA-NUS EMBA students with members of the center’s advisory board, a dedicated and actively engaged group of visionary global leaders spanning a variety of geographies and industries. The program provides students with a unique opportunity to connect and form meaningful relationships with board members, who offer valuable counsel and guidance on professional endeavors, living and working abroad, global business and life lessons. By playing a direct role in shaping the next generation of global leaders, board members contribute in the most meaningful ways. Mentees gain valuable guidance in academic and career direction, obtain advice and perspective, gain insights into industries and professions of interest, and learn about professional and personal development skills required to succeed. The program was established to augment knowledge and understanding among students interested in pursuing a career in international business and management across a variety of industries and disciplines, as well as living and working abroad upon graduation. During the 2019-20 academic year, four full-time MBA, two FEMBA and one UCLA-NUS EMBA students are participating as mentees in the seventh year of the program.

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Monday, February 10, 2020 6:00 PM – 7:15 PM UCLA Bunche Hall

“Israeli Politics and Future Directions” with Former Knesset Member, Haim Ramon

On March 2, Israelis are heading for an unprecedented third national election within 11 months, and the country has been without a permanent government since April, 2019. Two prior rounds of elections - in April and September - ended in a “draw” between the centrist Blue and White party, and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s Likud party. Neither side has been able to form a governing coalition, and in the meantime Netanyahu has been indicted on charges of bribery and corruption, but refuses to step aside. What could happen next, and what does all this mean for Israel's future? On Monday, February 10 in the early evening, students, faculty and members of the local community heard a lively presentation from Haim Ramon, a former Knesset Member, on contemporary Israeli politics, the reasons for Israel’s current political deadlock and his predictions for the March election, given his long experience in Israeli politics and his deep knowledge of it. Following his presentation, Dov Waxman, Rosalinde and Arthur Gilbert Foundation Chair in Israel Studies and director of the Younes and Soraya Nazarian Center for Israeli Studies, had several questions for Ramon. A veteran Israeli politician, Ramon was a Knesset Member between 1983 and 2009, and was appointed as Minister of Health in the government of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin in 1992. He also held the posts of Minister of the Interior in 1995, Minister of Justice in 2006, and served as Vice Premier in the Prime Minister’s Office (2007-2009). Born in Tel Aviv, Ramon served as an officer in the Israel Air Force. This event was organized by the Younes and Soraya Nazarian Center for Israeli Studies and co-sponsored by the UCLA Anderson Jewish Business Student Association and Center for Global Management.

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Thursday, February 6, 2020, 5:00 – 6:30 PM, Executive Dining Room

Global Networking Reception for Students & Faculty – Strengthening Global Intellectual and Social Connections between Faculty and Students

A key objective of the Center for Global Management is to help strengthen the intellectual and social connections between faculty and students interested in global management and international affairs. On February 6, 2020, prior to the opening of spring quarter course bidding, around 150 students, faculty and CGM partners gathered in the executive dining room for the center's annual networking reception. The reception provided an opportunity for UCLA Anderson students to learn about the global opportunities available at UCLA Anderson both on campus and abroad, including the opportunity to travel abroad with the CGM’s global immersion and FEMBA and EMBA international exchange courses, courses, make a global impact with the center’s support for international field study projects, learn a language, specialize in global management, enroll in on-campus global management courses and participate in the CGM’s programming. The event provided an opportunity for students to interact with faculty who teach global courses as well as faculty and Ph.D. students who have global research and teaching interests. First year students networked with students across degree programs who have traveled abroad, enrolled in global courses and engaged with the center’s programming. The center’s faculty and executive directors, Professor Sebastian Edwards and Lucy Allard provided welcome remarks and an overview of the CGM's courses and programming and introduced faculty members to the students. The reception provided an opportunity for students currently enrolled in global courses and engaged with the center's programming, including those who have traveled abroad for global immersion courses and international field study primary research to network and share their experiences with others.

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Thursday, February 6, 2020 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM, La Force Conference Room

Lunch Series on “Running a Global Business” with Kevin Berryman (’87), President and CFO, Jacobs Engineering Group

On Thursday, February 6, the Center for Global Management hosted a luncheon with Kevin Berryman (’87), a member of the CGM’s advisory board and alumnus of the FEMBA program, who serves as president and CFO of Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., one of the world’s largest and most diverse providers of technical professional services, with operations around the globe. Berryman, a native of California has enjoyed an extremely successful global career and now oversees Jacobs digital and information technology and all aspects of corporate finance and treasury, investor relations and communications, strategy, M&A and internal audit.

The luncheon provided an opportunity for students across the MBA and MSBA programs who are pursuing the global management specialization, and/or are members of the Strategy and Operations Management and International Business Associations to meet with Berryman in an informal and interactive setting and hear his insights on what is it like to run a global business with distributed operations in the midst of complex and changing economic, political and cultural environments in the United States and globally. He discussed his career trajectory post the UCLA Anderson FEMBA program transitioning from Nestlé in Switzerland to Jacobs Engineering in Dallas today and the importance of global perspectives and experience in today’s environment. Berryman also shared his thoughts on his industry, experience transferring industries and insights on the different functional roles he has served in. He addressed the importance of having a holistic view of a business, understanding accounting and financial aspects and knowing how to drive performance. As students think about their careers, he touched on the importance of considering lateral moves to better understand different facets of a business and its operations. He also emphasized the importance of finding a passion which helps to both achieve a work life balance and make you a better team member. Past and present CGM mentees also attended the luncheon. The previous evening, Berryman was the guest speaker in Professor Sakakibara’s International Business Strategy class where he talked about entering and successfully working in foreign markets and how business and investment decisions are made. Prior to his role with Jacobs, Berryman served as executive vice president and chief financial officer of International Flavors & Fragrances (IFF). Before joining IFF, he enjoyed a successful 25-year career with Nestlé where he held various positions of increasing responsibility in the areas of financial and operations management and spent a number of years at their global headquarters in Switzerland.

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Saturday, February 1, 2020 8:30 am – 4:30 pm

The Los Angeles Global Health Conference, “2020 and Beyond: Spotlight on a Shared Future,” Covel Commons at UCLA

The fifth annual Los Angeles Global Health Conference (LAGHC), “2020 and Beyond: Spotlight on a Shared Future,” took place at UCLA on Saturday, February 1. This annual global health conference hosted in Southern California brought together around 300 individuals from various disciplines across academia, NGOs, business, and the public sector to discuss the current status of world health and provided an interactive educational forum to discuss innovative ways to tackle health disparities—locally and globally. Home to individuals from more than 140 countries speaking 224 different languages, Los Angeles's rich cultural diversity makes it an ideal place to examine the current status of world health. The LAGHC is organized by students from medicine, public health, and other disciplines from universities all over the region, including UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, Fielding School of Public Health, Undergraduate Departments, and USC Institute on Inequalities in Global Health, among others.

Given the current global events, focusing on humility and transparency is key to successfully address health disparities both in our backyard and abroad. The 2020 conference brought together students, faculty, researchers and professionals with members of the Los Angeles communities to stimulate a dialogue around the varying disparities both in our backyards and around the world that also informs and equips our future global health leaders. Following opening remarks by Kelsey Martin, Dean of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, the opening keynote address, “How Do You Eat an Elephant? Learning Lessons for a Shared Global Health Agenda” was delivered by Elizabeth Anne Bukasi, MBCHB, M. MED, MPH, Ph.D., PGD, MBE, chief research officer of Kenya Medial Research Institute. Her primary research interests are focused on sexually transmitted infections, reproductive health and HIV prevention, care and treatment and capacity building for research and programs. Bukasi also has a keen interest in research and clinical ethics/research regulatory systems. The day also included numerous breakout sessions with a diverse group of speakers around four specific tracks, including “Global crisis: epidemics, disasters and threats; Innovation in global health: film and technology; Vulnerable populations: migrant and refugee health; and Gender equality and sexual and reproductive care.

A breakout session on “Bridging the Digital Divide in Sweetwaters, South Africa” was delivered by Connie Jiang and Spencer Feliciano-Lyons, full-time MBA candidates from the Class of 2020 at UCLA Anderson. They discussed elements of their Applied Management Research field study project with the Human Sciences Research Council, South Africa. HSRC is Africa's largest dedicated social science and humanities research agency and policy think tank with the mission is to advance social sciences and humanities for public use. The objective of the project was to identify a viable long-term solution to increase affordable data access to the impoverished rural community of Sweetwaters in South Africa. This in turn would help to better understand barriers to entry of MHealth applications. The project addressed the digital divide and focused on the implications of the divide on human and social development. The team identified three key components to bridge the divide, namely access, usage and ultimately benefits both to individuals and to the community. Other members of the AMR team working on this project include: Stephanie Hong, Pitcha Leelapornpisid and Justin Pruttivarasin. The session highlighted how students can use their business school skills, knowledge and frameworks to make a positive impact in the area of global health. The UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management was a silver sponsor of the event. Other sponsors included the UCLA International Institute, UCLA Health, David Geffen School of Medicine Global health program, UCLA AIDS Institute and The Promise Institute for Human Rights at the UCLA School of Law, among others.

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Wednesday, January 29, 2020, at 5:00 – 6:30 p.m. Executive Dining Room, UCLA Anderson

World Today Discussion Series on “Protests in Hong Kong, Paris and Around the World: Making Sense of the Turmoil — A Socioeconomic and Business Perspective”

In 2019, demonstrations around the globe, both peaceful and violent were set off by social unrest over economic instability, government corruption and inequality. The protests created a domino effect, crossing borders and bringing crowds of people to streets globally to demand change. In Great Britain, mass demonstrations took place both for and against Brexit, destined to define the country’s future; in France, a year into the yellow vest protests, while demonstrations waned in size, grievances remain; in Chile, anger at increases in public transport costs grew into a broad-based movement protesting inequality; in Lebanon, a levy on WhatsApp calls sparked pent-up anger, forcing Prime Minister Saad Hariri to resign in October; and in Hong Kong, a June rally against a law allowing extradition to China morphed into a broad anti-China movement. The desire to be heard was felt by people from different nationalities, religions and political affiliations. On Wednesday, January 29, the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management hosted a discussion over dinner with Christine Loh, visiting professor and former Government minister, Hong Kong S.A.R. Government; Chris Tang, Edward W. Carter Chair In Business Administration; and Romain Wacziarg, Hans Hufschmid Chair in Management who addressed the global landscape and explored the worldwide push for action from a socio-economic and business perspective. While there is little certainty on what will happen going forward, they also shared their longer term views and the possible wider implications for business and society that could evolve as citizens across the globe continue to protest injustices, demand reforms and push for change. They also addressed the role of government. The discussion was moderated by Sebastian Edwards, Henry Ford II Chair in International Management. The packed room included faculty and students from the UCLA Anderson and its full-time, fully employed and executive MBA as well as Ph.D. programs. Students from the UCLA School of Law and UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs were also invited to attend. The World Today Discussion Series engages students in dialogue in an interactive, engaging and enriching discussion format around current global issues that transcend borders. Through the series, the CGM engages globally minded students with issues that matter and ideas that stimulate. Through balanced discourse, the series serves as a neutral forum to educate students on global issues while at the same time encourage debate and examination.

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Thursday, January 23, 2020, Anderson Afternoon, North Terrace

Celebrating Lunar New Year at UCLA Anderson

To celebrate the Year of the Rat, promote familiarity with and understanding of the Asian culture, and strengthen cross-club collaboration, on Thursday, January 23, 2020, the Center for Global Management supported the Greater China Business Association (GCBA), Asian Management Student Association (AMSA), Korean Business Student Association (KBSA), and Southeast Asian Business Association (SEABA) to celebrate the Lunar New Year. The Lunar New Year is one of the most important holidays in many Asian countries, and celebrated by even more people of Asian heritage globally. During Anderson Afternoon on January 23, 2020, these four clubs took the opportunity to invite the entire UCLA Anderson community to join and celebrate the Lunar New Year together. This year, more than 400 UCLA Anderson students, faculty, and staff participated in the festivities. The North Terrace was transformed into a sea of red with lantern decorations and many different types of décor to bring out the best of the holiday spirit. Authentic Chinese and Southeast Asian food was also served to fully indulge the community in the celebrations. To help classmates better understand the traditions, the clubs prepared a variety of celebratory activities, including learning Chinese calligraphy, winning red envelopes, guessing word riddles, and passing out traditional Lunar New Year candies among other activities. The students also had the chance to watch and enjoy the traditional Fan and Hat dance performed by “VCN Traditional” from the UCLA Vietnamese Student Union in celebration of the Lunar New Year. The event was hosted by GCBA, AMSA, KBSA, and SEABA, and supported by the CGM, Anderson Student Association and the Office of Equity, Diversity, and Inclusion.

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Thursday, January 23, 2020 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

Global Management Lecture Series on “Africa: An Opportunity for Those Who Discern and Distill: A Cultural Insight into Commercial Success,“ with Sanjeev Gupta, Board of Directors Member and Executive Director for Financial Services, Africa Finance Corporation

Africa is the world’s second largest continent with a population of over 1.2 billion people. Africa thrives in all its diversity and amidst the proxy wars that keep affecting its progress. People and hope combined with capital and perseverance change everything. On Thursday, January 23, the Center for Global Management welcomed to campus Sanjeev Gupta, board of directors member and executive director for financial services at the Africa Finance Corporation (AFC) for a conversation and moderated discussion as part of its Global management Lecture Series. AFC is an independent, majority private sector owned, multi-lateral African financial institution that provides project structuring expertise and risk capital to address Africa’s infrastructure development needs. Gupta addressed a packed classroom of UCLA Anderson MBA, Ph.D. as well as undergraduate students, alumni and representatives from UCLA’s African Studies Center for a fascinating discussion as he provided a cultural insight into commercial success on the continent. Gupta explained how Africa is no different to anywhere else - to succeed, businesses need on the ground presence, patient capital and the ability to understand local nuances and encourage local practices. They also need to embrace multiculturalism as a reality and adaptability as an imperative. Gupta shared his real life experiences of success, planning and delivery in Africa that while hard to replicate in the confines of a business school, were rich in content, and provided succor and hope to aspiring leaders willing and keen to succeed in what is paradoxically referred to as the last frontier for humanity. Gupta has 30 years of experience in investment and fund management, private equity and corporate finance. His forte has been to blend global and indigenous corporates, financial investors and governments to develop commercially viable business and development models that leave a sustainable impact on emerging market economies. Gupta’s overall responsibility in AFC includes treasury, trade finance, debt syndication, country and investor relations and financial advisory. Prior to joining AFC, Gupta was the managing partner of Emerging Markets Mergers and Acquisitions Center of Excellence at Ernst and Young. He has also served as the chief executive officer of Sanlam Investment Management Emerging Markets operations and was a founder and managing partner of Emerging Opportunity Consulting, a boutique advisory firm specializing in SME financing.

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Thursday, January 16, 2020

Networking Reception with Students from the University of Sydney Business School’s EMBA and UCLA Anderson EMBA, FEMBA and FTMBA Programs, Executive Dining Room

The Center for Global Management hosted around 20 students from the University of Sydney Business School’s Executive MBA program at UCLA Anderson from January 12-16 for a one-week global management seminar focused on “Finding Opportunity in Disruptive Technology.” The seminar provided participants with an opportunity to complete part of their studies at UCLA and gain valuable global experience and insights through focusing on the innovation and creativity that are such an integral part of the business community in Los Angeles and California, including current academic research and business application around topics such as artificial intelligence, machine learning and deep learning business management impacts; as well as technology and business model driven innovation, the sharing economy and disruptions in healthcare. During the week, students visited the Cedars-Sinai accelerator, Netflix and Paramount Studios. On Thursday, January 16, the students enjoyed a networking reception in UCLA Anderson’s executive dining room, hosted by the CGM where they had an opportunity to meet and connect with first and second year students from UCLA Anderson’s Los Angeles-based EMBA, FEMBA and FTMBA programs.

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Tuesday, January 14, 2020 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM Executive Dining Room

Lunch Series with Alex Gouvea (’90), Senior Partner, McKinsey & Co. on “A Global Consulting Career and Doing Business Internationally”

On Tuesday, January 14, the Center for Global Management welcomed to campus UCLA Anderson alumnus Alex Gouvea (’90). As senior partner for McKinsey & Co. in Brazil, Gouvea led the Firm’s Banking Practice, its Organization Services and, more recently, the Recovery & Transformation Unit in South America. Since joining McKinsey & Co. in 1990, Gouvea has worked across South America as well as in the United States, Canada, and Turkey. During his almost 30 years with McKinsey, Gouvea has served clients in financial services, retail, telecommunications, chemicals, metals and mining. The luncheon provided an opportunity for interested students across the full-time, fully employed and executive MBA and MSBA programs who are pursuing the global management specialization and/or are members of UCLA Anderson’s Latin American Business Association and/or Management Consulting Association to meet with Gouvea in an informal and interactive setting and hear about his successful career trajectory post-Anderson. He addressed his extensive consulting career with McKinsey & Co. in South America and globally, and shared his thoughts on comparative challenges helping companies do business in Brazil, across South America and internationally. In addition to sharing his own experiences and personal journey, Gouvea also explained how the digital revolution has impacted consulting and how consultants these days are problem solving in different and dynamic ways. Over the years the world has become more complex. He touched on the unique challenges of doing business in Brazil and emphasized the importance of paying attention to the personal dimension. The lunch, organized by the Center for Global Management was supported by the Latin American Business Association and Management Consulting Association.

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Sunday, December 15 – Saturday, December 21, 2019

39 MBA students travel to Mumbai and Hyderabad for the CGM’s global immersion course to learn about “The Business Environment of India with an emphasis on entertainment and finance (Mumbai) and technology and biotech (Hyderabad),” with Romain Wacziarg, Hans Hufschmid Chair in Management and professor of economics

During winter break, 39 students from all four of UCLA Anderson’s MBA programs - full-time, fully employed, executive and UCLA-NUS executive MBA also visited Mumbai and Hyderabad for the in-country week of the CGM’s global immersion course, “The Business Environment of India,” led by Romain Wacziarg, Hans Hufschmid Chair in Management and professor of economics. In Mumbai, the course focused on entertainment and finance; and in Hyderabad, the emphasis was on healthcare, biotech and technology. The Center for Global Management partnered with and visited the Indian School of Business for the Hyderabad portion of the course.

This particular course familiarized students with India’s business environment. Since experiencing a severe balance of payments crisis in 1991, India has engaged in several waves of economic reforms that have resulted in high rates of growth over the last 25 years. Aided by strong fundamentals such as a democratic political system, a vast and youthful population, a culture of entrepreneurship and a large cohort of well-trained engineers and scientists, India is emerging as one of the major economic powerhouses of the 21st century. Yet challenges remain: an inadequate infrastructure, rampant corruption, growing income inequality, the permanence of the caste system and a dysfunctional political economy have conspired to hinder the strides that India was poised to make. The government headed by Narendra Modi, who was recently reelected to a second term, had initially rekindled the flame of reforms, tackling taxes and the business climate. But will this modernist agenda be stymied by the regime's populist tendencies? With a vibrant entrepreneurial class and a new business-friendly government, will India be able to meet the many challenges that she faces? This course explored both the risks and opportunities offered by the Indian market for foreign investors and domestic entrepreneurs alike. This was the fifth time a global immersion course had visited India, however it was the first time that a course had focused on and visited Hyderabad, where the sectors of some emphasis included healthcare, biotech and technology.

During the one-week in-country, students heard from and engaged with many distinguished and influential business leaders and members of the civil society in India, as well as visited places of historical and cultural importance. The inaugural visit was to Sony Pictures Networks India where students heard from CEO and industry veteran, N.P. Singh who provided an excellent overview of the media and entertainment landscape in India and Sony’s importance in the sector. Aditya Mehta, head of corporate strategy and Manu Narang, chief HR officer also added significant context to the discussion highlighting Sony’s role as a “content influencer” with the ability to shape culture and steer topics discussed in the country’s social circles. The group also enjoyed a tour of Sony’s sports studios. To continue the entertainment theme, the group visited Yash Raj Films, the only privately held and fully integrated studio in India where they heard from Shantanu Hudikar, the chief of sound who discussed the role of music in movies. Students also toured this 50-year strong production house and vertically integrated studio that controls almost every part of the value chain from production to post production, domestic and international distribution, music and home entertainment, marketing, design, digital, licensing, merchandising, talent management, brand partnerships, music studios and film studios - all in-house facilities, which make it one of the most coveted entertainment conglomerates in the country. Students also visited Viacom 18 Media Pvt. Limited, an Indian joint venture operation between ViacomCBS and TV18 in Mumbai. Founded in 2007, Viacom 18 owns various channels of ViacomCBS, as well as various consumer products in India. Sudhanshu Vats, the group CEO and managing director shared the history and growth of Viacom 18 and and the company’s journeyto becoming India's fastest growing entertainment network. He also addressed the appetite for and growth of digital consumption in India.

On the finance side, students visited the Reserve Bank of India in Mumbai, the country’s central bank which controls monetary policy and is responsible for maintaining economic growth and stability. Students heard from some of the Bank’s senior staff members on India’s banking system and learned about monetary policy and financial regulations in country. At the National Payments Corporation of India (NPCI) students were provided a thorough overview of the retail payments sector in India and how e-payments are handled from NPCI’s chief operations officer and chief of marketing, Praveena Rai and Kunal Kalawatia. NPCI is an umbrella organization for operating retail payments and settlement systems in the country. It is an initiative of the RBI and Indian Banks' Association (IBA) under the provisions of the Payment and Settlement Systems Act, 2007 for creating a robust payment and settlement infrastructure in the country. At the Asiatic Society of Mumbai, students heard from Tata Capital’s Avijit Bhattacharya, chief HR officer and Kumar Anurag, deputy vice president of strategy and special projects who explained how the overall financial landscape in India has changed over the years, including efforts to digitize financial transactions, challenges experienced by the sector as well as the journey of Tata Capital and a discussion on its activities, services and products. Tata Capital Ltd. is the flagship financial services company of the Indian multinational conglomerate, Tata Group.

At Barclays Rise, located in the heart of Mumbai’s fintech community, Sandeep Das, CEO of Barclays Private Clients group, together with the Private Bank’s heads of investment and equities discussed wealth management in India and the changing landscape of the private banking business in the country. Later, students had the opportunity to gain a better understanding of the start-up ecosystem and entrepreneurial environment in the country from Ajay Ramasubramaniam, co-founder and CEO of Startup Reseau. Together with his partners, Ramasubramaniam has successfully built India’s top meta-accelerator which brings together a global network of startup ecosystem enablers: startups, enterprises, capital, markets, mentors and services. Lincy Therattil, Rise Mumbai’s head of open innovation and fintech platform lead provided an overview of Barclays Rise, a global community of fintech innovators that seeks to disrupt, challenge and confront the way things are done in the industry. Discussions around the financial sector in India, would not be complete without a presentation and dialogue around microfinance. This was delivered by Anujeet Varadkar, CEO of Svatantra, a next generation microfinance entity that leverages technology to bank the unbanked and encourages entrepreneurship in rural areas, primarily among women. Headquartered in Mumbai, Svatantra is registered with the RBI as a non-deposit taking, non-banking finance company (NBFC) – microfinance institution (MFI). Importantly, it was the first recipient of the NBFC-MFI in India. Varadkar explained the history of microfinance in India, the evolution of the MFI in the country and the current environment.

On the final evening in Mumbai, to complement the finance-related discussions and visits, students enjoyed a panel discussion at the historic Royal Bombay Yacht Club on “financial inclusion – bringing India’s masses into the formal financial and banking system.” Ashwin Mittal (’01), president of Course5 Intelligence and president of the UCLA Anderson Alumni Mumbai subchapter moderated the discussion. Panelists included UCLA Anderson alumni Abhishek Agarwal (’10), co-founder and CEO at CreditVidya, a leading player in the alternative credit scoring space in India that leverages alternative data, AI and machine learning to facilitate institutional credit for the underserved; and Ashish Kotecha (’01), managing partner at Bain Capital. They were joined by Vikas Khemani, founder of Carnelian Asset Management, former head of investment banking and institutional equities for Edelweiss, a large diversified financial services company based in Mumbai. A networking event followed. Alumni from UCLA Anderson’s full-time, fully employed, UCLA-NUS EMBA and PGPX programs joined the evening.

Following three full days in Mumbai, students then traveled to Hyderabad where the focus of the sessions centered around healthcare, biotech and technology. This portion of the course was organized by the Indian School of Business (ISB). The inaugural visit was to Dr. Reddy’s Labs, a global pharmaceutical company based in Hyderabad that uses science and technology to provide affordable and innovative medicines. Nithin Nemani, strategy lead and Kapil Choudhury, head of business development provided an excellent overview of the biopharma industry in India and shared Dr. Reddy’s journey. Students were also taken on a tour of its facility. Driven by the belief that good health can’t wait, Dr. Reddy’s central purpose is to accelerate access to affordable and innovative medicines. The company has commercial presence in 30 countries, including the U.S. and has also enjoyed significant success in highly regulated markets. Students learned about state of the art healthcare delivery system in India through a visit to and tour of Apollo Hospitals, Asia’s foremost integrated healthcare service provider where they heard from Subramanyam Yadavalli, regional CEO. Apollo Hospitals, renowned as the architect of modern healthcare in India, has a robust presence across the healthcare ecosystem, including hospitals, pharmacies, primary care and diagnostic clinics and several retail health models. As the nation's first corporate hospital, Apollo Hospitals is acclaimed for pioneering the private healthcare revolution in the country.

Later at L V Prasad Eye Institute (LVPEI), students learned about the confluence of efficiency and innovation from Raghu Gullapalli, executive director of emerging technologies and business development and then enjoyed an interactive discussion with LVPEI’s founder Gullapalli N Rao. Rao established LVPEI in 1987 after a successful career in the United States as an academic ophthalmologist and with a generous contribution by L.V. Prasad who was a pioneering Indian film producer, actor, director, cinematographer and businessman as he was struck by the lack of good eye care in India. LVPEI now is a World Health Organization Collaborating Centre for Prevention of Blindness and a comprehensive eye health facility. In 1997, LVPEI began work on a model that ensures excellent eye care for all, across villages and cities. The model follows a five-level inter-connected structure, building permanent infrastructure and human resources at each level of care. Each level generates income and delivers good quality eye care, irrespective of a person’s ability to pay. The Government of India adopted the LVPEI eye health pyramid as a model of eye care service delivery in its current five-year plan budget and the model is being rolled out in other states in a phased manner. Students received a fascinating tour of the facility where they also observed firsthand the different areas and levels of service and comfort given to patients based on what they can afford to pay. An overview and understanding of the biotech industry in India from a global perspective was also provided through a visit to Bharat Biotech, the largest vaccines and bio-‐therapeutics manufacturer in India, headquartered in Hyderabad. Bharat Biotech started operations in 1997 and today has over 160 patents. Known for its world-class R&D and manufacturing capabilities, the company’s mission is to deliver affordable, safe and high quality vaccines and bio-therapeutics that help people prevail over diseases. It also seeks to lead innovation in biotechnology in order to lead the fight against disease with a focus on emerging markets. Students heard from Sai Prasad, president of quality operations and from G.V.J.A. Harshavardhan, director of viral vaccines and international affairs. Bharat Biotech was co-founded by Dr. Krishna M. Ella who strongly believes that innovative technology in vaccine development is essential to solve public healthcare problems caused by infectious diseases. During their time in Hyderabad, students also had the opportunity to visit Infosys to better understand the rise of big multinational technology firms in India and tour T-Hub, a tech incubator and accelerator to better understand India’s tech start-up scene and ecosystem.

The Indian School of Business was the Center for Global Management’s academic partner in Hyderabad and at the conclusion of the week, students visited the ISB campus. UCLA Anderson Ph.D. alumnus Sarang Deo (Ph.D. ’07), associate professor and executive director of ISB’s Max Institute of Healthcare Management delivered the final session, “connecting the dots” on health care and biotech, which provided terrific context and perspective to the Hyderabad segment of the course. During the week, students witnessed the influence and wonderful support and engagement of UCLA alumni in both Mumbai and Hyderabad. In addition to the alumni panel and networking in Mumbai, UCLA Anderson alumni joined the closing dinner, hosted on campus by ISB as its own alumni gathered together for the School’s annual alumni Solstice celebration and festival. Alumni from the FEMBA and PGPX programs joined the evening of networking. The next day, Professors Bhagwan Chowdhry and Romain Wacziarg united during the alumni weekend to deliver a talk on what prevents countries from attaining prosperity and what countries such as India can do about it. During the week, students also got to experience some of the culture, cuisine and sights of India. In Mumbai, students visited the Gateway of India and the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Terminus, formerly known as Victoria Terminus. They also explored other notable landmarks such as the Horniman Circle Gardens, St. Thomas Cathedral, the ornamentally sculpted architectural heritage monument Flora Fountain and the Bombay High Court, one of the oldest courts in India. At the conclusion of the week, some students headed to explore other parts of India and a number headed to Agra to visit the magnificent Taj Mahal.

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Sunday, December 15 – Saturday, December 21, 2019

38 students from all four MBA programs travel to Singapore and Bangkok for the CGM’s global immersion course to understand “Business and the New Dynamics of International Trade: The Cases of Singapore and Thailand,” with Jerry Nickelsburg, adjunct full professor of economics and director of the UCLA Anderson Forecast

During winter break, 38 students from all four of UCLA Anderson’s MBA programs - full-time, fully employed, executive and UCLA-NUS executive MBA visited Singapore and Bangkok for the in-country week of the CGM’s global immersion course, “Business and the New Dynamics of International Trade: The Cases of Singapore and Thailand,” led by Jerry Nickelsburg, adjunct full professor of economics and director of the UCLA Anderson Forecast.

Over the last four decades, southeast Asia has been the locus of rapidly growing, globalized, emerging economies. As the most successful countries moved into the realm of middle to upper income, growth rates have slowed, but opportunities for international business still abound. Indeed, the two most successful countries in Southeast Asia, Singapore and Thailand are heavily dependent on foreign direct investment and exports. The international trading system and globalization are now being questioned in many quarters. The old guard that fostered the dramatic growth of Singapore and Thailand have now passed the torch to a new generation of leaders. These two countries, with similar growth patterns but very different socio-economic structures, provided an ideal contrast to study how these winds of change affect business opportunities, investment and profitability; particularly with regard to manufacturing, technology, finance, and trade. Throughout the course, students learned how these two countries, with similar successful economic trajectories, but different risk backdrops face a changing world economic system. They must adapt to new demands for consumerism by their population, increased inter-Asian trade, a changing geopolitical environment, the advent of the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and China’s One Belt One Road initiative in order to foster a continued, healthy business environment. Through both on-campuses classes, followed by one-week in both Singapore and Bangkok, students explored these areas in the context of manufacturing, technology, trade, and finance. A key objective of the course was to understand the economic, social and cultural background of business in light of the changing world trade patterns in recent years and what the changing world order means for economic structure, business strategy and business risk and opportunities. Although this was the second and third time that a global immersion course had visited Singapore and Thailand respectively, it was the first time that a course had focused on and visited both Singapore and Thailand together.

UCLA Anderson’s dual-degree partner, NUS Business School hosted the inaugural sessions in its Mochtar Riady building where the students were warmly greeted by Professor Luh Luh Lan, academic director of the UCLA-NUS EMBA program. CGM founding board member and UCLA Anderson alumna Hwee Hua Lim (’89), former cabinet minister in the Prime Minister’s Office delivered the perfect inaugural address - a discussion on navigating the local and ASEAN political and economic environments which also touched on the role of government and set an extremely important framework politically and economically for the week. This was followed by a discussion with Lin Teck Tan, director of the future economy planning office for the Ministry of Trade and Industry. He addressed what Singapore is doing to prepare for its future economy, including deepening and diversifying its international connections; acquiring and utilizing deep skills; and building strong digital capabilities. Dionisis Kolokotsas, head of competition and economic policy for Asia-Pacific at Google later presented on Asia-Pacific’s public policy landscape. He addressed internet use in APAC and southeast Asia’s digital economy. He also explained the motivations for policy initiatives and policy areas, including privacy, data, cross border flows and platform regulations and the importance of Singapore as a global trade partner and driver of policy making. During a visit to Microsoft Singapore, chief technology officer Richard Koh also described Microsoft’s transformation and explained how the company had needed to adapt itself over the year to remain relevant in a fast-paced changing environment. In Singapore, students also visited the Monetary Authority of Singapore (MAS), the country’s central bank and integrated financial regulator. They learned about Singapore’s approach to monetary policy and the role and functions of the MAS from Alvin Teo, deputy director in the monetary and domestic markets management area and Dr. Keen Meng Choy, executive director in the economic analysis department. Students also enjoyed a tour of the MAS gallery to learn more about the role of MAS in issuing currency, conducting monetary policy, managing Singapore’s official foreign reserves, regulating and supervising the financial sector, and promoting Singapore as an international financial center. The gallery also highlighted MAS’ efforts in raising financial literacy, and offered a glimpse of how technology and innovation could transform the future of financial services.

Students learned more about cross-border business between Singapore and the larger Asia Pacific region during a visit to Rakuten Asia where they were greeted by UCLA Anderson alumnus Ameya Khasgiwala (’19), senior manager at Rakuten. Founded in 1997 as an e-commerce B2B2C company during the early years of the internet, over the years, Rakuten has expanded overseas into areas such as banking and e-money. In 2010, the company accelerated its global business and shifted from a Japan-based venture to a global internet services company. Over the last few years, the company further explored new business models building Rakuten’s brand overseas through global partnerships with FC Barcelona and the NBA’s Golden State Warriors. Students heard from Hirofumi Jujo Maeda, manager of the regional coordination about the company’s different businesses and services in the region and around the world. They also learned about Asia as an investment business from Anh Sae Min, managing partner for Rakuten Ventures, the venture capital arm of Rakuten Group who invests in diverse verticals such as advertising technology, artificial intelligence and on-demand business around the world. Given the overarching theme of the course, a visit to Singapore would not be complete without a visit to the Port of Singapore to understand Singapore’s port industry and how the country’s logistics industry has developed into what it is today and its role as an important maritime logistics hub. The Port of Singapore is ranked as the top maritime capital of the world and is the world’s second busiest port in terms of total shipping tonnage and the world’s busiest transshipment port. Singapore lacks land and natural resources and therefore the Port is an economic necessity. Students toured the harbor and visited the Singapore Maritime gallery which tells the story of Singapore's transformation from a small trading post into a premier global hub port and leading international maritime center.

Students then traveled to Bangkok. The inaugural sessions provided excellent overviews and introductions to the economic, political and business environment of Thailand. Sarawan Dever, deputy director of the American Chamber of Commerce discussed the role of AmCham Thailand, reviewed Singapore-Thailand relations and provided an introduction to the business environment. He also addressed the importance of understanding Thailand’s culture and history for business success. Ricardo Ortiz, an ASEAN specialist, foreign policy analyst and lecturer at Stamford International University discussed Thailand's political environment and efforts to democratize Thailand with its plethora of coups; and Steven Anderson, commercial attaché at the U.S. Embassy Bangkok shared his perspectives on the impact of the U.S.-China trade war on Thailand’s economy and its role in international trade.

During a visit to the Bank of Thailand, students learned about Thailand’s financial landscape from Siripim Vimolchalao, deputy director in the financial institutions strategy area and how the Bank of Thailand is thinking about changes in a rapidly changing world order particularly in regard to the new digital world and how the 1997 crisis informs policy. At Asia Honda Motor, students enjoyed a factory tour and learned about Honda Motorcycle’s manufacturing and business operations in Asia, Honda’s business history in Thailand and the success of multi-nationals in the country. At Taskworld, a cloud-based collaboration platform, Reza Behnam, CEO and co-founder shared his experience and insights on global technology companies operating in Thailand. Later at Western Digital, a long-time innovator and storage industry leader, students heard from Chee Mak, director and HR business partner to better understand Thailand as a hub for global electrical appliance manufacturers. He also touched on the company’s amazing recovery after the floods. Students also enjoyed a tour of its factory showcasing the company’s manufacturing technology.

On the last day in Bangkok, students had the opportunity to hear about diplomacy and trade from UCLA alumnus Kantathi Suphamongkhon (B.S. ’76), Thailand’s 39th Minister of Foreign Affair; learn about intellectual property protection in Thailand and climate change as a tool from Fabrice Mattei, country manager and climate change and IP group head at Rouse, an IP services business focused on emerging markets. They also enjoyed a presentation on Thailand's technology industry and aerospace from double Bruin Varayuth “James” Yenbamroong (BSc '07, MSc ’10), CEO and founder, Mu Space Corp. A Thai-based start-up company founded in 2017, Mu Space develops satellite communication technologies that will accelerate the adoption of Internet of Things devices and smart cities. It also plans to lead space tourism in Asia.

During the week, students witnessed the influence and wonderful support and engagement of UCLA alumni in both Singapore and Thailand. In Singapore, the week officially opened with an alumni networking reception at the NUSS Graduate Club Suntec City with alumni from UCLA Anderson’s FTMBA and Ph.D. programs as well as a number of UCLA-NUS EMBA current students and alumni. UCLA-NUS EMBA alumnus and John Wooden fellow Ryan Tan (’19) was instrumental in facilitating high impact speakers and visits too. In Bangkok, Professor Jerry Nickelsburg moderated a panel discussion with UCLA Anderson alumni Poom Vorasetakarnkij (’06), Nattawin Phongsphetrarat (’99) and Pakkawan Pongpornprot (’08) who shared their career trajectory post- UCLA Anderson as well as their thoughts and insights on business and the new dynamics of international trade from both their personal as well as own industry perspective. Following the discussion, students networked with UCLA Anderson alumni, current students as well as recent admits.

During the week, students also experienced local culture, visited key sites of important historic significance and enjoyed local cuisine. In Singapore, UCLA-NUS EMBA alumnus Kevin Yap (’19) hosted the group at his Straits Chinese Restaurant and served authentic Peranakan cuisine epitomizing the region. Also before the start of the academic sessions, students enjoyed a Sunday afternoon tour of the island city-state where they explored the Marina Bay area and visited the Marina Bay Sands Hotel and its observation deck, SkyPark for terrific views over Singapore. Students also visited the famous Singapore landmark Merlion Park, experienced Clarke Quay and Little India and also visited the colonial-style luxury Raffles Hotel. In Bangkok, in between sessions, students enjoyed a visit to Wat Pho, the Temple of the Reclining Buddha and enjoyed a boat tour to see the Wat Arun, Buddhist Temple of Dawn. At the conclusion of the week, some students headed to explore other parts of southeast Asia.

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Monday, December 2, 2019 6:00 PM The Beverly Hilton, Beverly Hills

2019 John Wooden Global Leadership Award Dinner Benefitting the 2019 John Wooden Fellows and Honoring Mellody Hobson, Co-CEO of Ariel Investments and one of TIME Magazine’s 100 Most Influential People

On Monday, December 2, 2019, UCLA Anderson recognized Mellody Hobson, co-CEO of Ariel Investments, vice chair of Starbucks and director of JP Morgan Chase with the John Wooden Global Leadership Award, at a gala dinner held at The Beverly Hilton Hotel in Beverly Hills. The distinction, named for legendary UCLA basketball coach, author and leadership expert John Wooden (1910–2010), is presented each year to an exceptional leader whose leadership style and service to the community reflect the same high standards of performance, integrity and ethical values set by Wooden.

Hobson was chosen as this year's Wooden Award recipient in recognition of her business leadership, her philanthropic and community-building activities and her strong advocacy of financial literacy and investor education. "Mellody Hobson has demonstrated principled, outstanding leadership throughout her career," UCLA Anderson Dean Antonio Bernardo said. "She is a passionate advocate for financial literacy and investor education, and her boardroom service and skills have benefited many communities, including her hometown of Chicago." At the banquet, Jeffrey Katzenberg, entertainment executive and co-founder and managing partner of WndrCo engaged Hobson in an on-stage conversation about leadership, values and the Wooden legacy. “Mellody is completely unafraid to speak up for what she feels is right," Katzenberg said. "I have seen time and time again that what she feels is right, is right." In accepting the award, Hobson recalled that early in her career she had read books about great investors and about great coaches, including Wooden. "I love the fact that he said honesty was non-negotiable," she said. "I will cherish this award because of what John Wooden represented, and accept it with humility."

Hobson, who was recruited to Ariel by founder John Rogers when she was still a Princeton undergraduate, began at the investment management firm as a summer intern and rose to become its president, serving in that role for two decades. In July, she was appointed Ariel's co-CEO and is now its largest shareholder. Hobson is a nationally recognized voice for financial literacy and investor education. She serves as a financial expert in frequent media appearances on CBS News and other outlets, and authors a regular column for Black Enterprise Magazine. An active philanthropist and community-builder in her hometown of Chicago and elsewhere, she also channels her financial expertise as a board member of Starbucks, JPMorgan Chase and Quibi, a short-form video content company founded by Katzenberg. In a powerful 2014 TED talk titled "Color Blind or Color Brave?" Hobson urged Americans to engage in more open, even uncomfortable conversations about race, calling such exchanges a clear pathway to better businesses and a better society. In 2015, Time Magazine named her one of the 100 Most Influential People in the World.

The audience of around 650 included UCLA Anderson Board of Advisors members and other generous supporters, along with members of Coach Wooden’s family, members of the Anderson family together with Basketball Hall of Famers Jamaal Wilkes (B.A. ’74) and Ann Meyers Drysdale (B.A. ’79) joined past Wooden Fellows, current UCLA Anderson students, alumni, faculty and senior leadership from across the UCLA campus for a ceremony that included a welcome by 2008-2018 Wooden fellows. Three-time Emmy-winning actor Beau Bridges, who played for Coach Wooden at UCLA and stayed close to him throughout his life, made a special appearance to pay tribute to the coach.

Net proceeds from the annual dinner fund four $35,000 John Wooden Global Leadership Fellowships, given to deserving UCLA Anderson students who embody Coach Wooden’s leadership ideals and commitment to improving the lives of others. During the ceremony, the four 2019 fellowship recipients Amanda Beck (FTMBA ’20), Danielle Schlegel (EMBA ’20), Rob Busalacchi (FEMBA ’20) and Apichaya Taechamahapun (UCLA-NUS EMBA ’20) were recognized and awarded the John Wooden Global Leadership Fellowship, which is among the most prestigious honors Anderson students can receive. They took the stage to express their thoughts on what Coach Wooden’s values-based leadership means to them. Wooden Fellows are honored because they possess his focus on ethics, team spirit, skill, hard work and loyalty, along with a commitment to constant learning, continual improvement and innovation.

UCLA Anderson, in partnership with Coach John Wooden’s family, honors one exceptional leader each year with this prestigious award for his or her exemplary leadership and service to the community. Past recipients of the John Wooden Global Leadership Award include: Reed Hastings, co-founder and CEO, Netflix (2018); Kevin Plank, chairman and CEO, Under Armour (2017); W. James McNerney Jr., retired president, CEO and chairman, the Boeing Company (2016); Ursula Burns, chairman and CEO of Xerox (2015); Paul E. Jacobs, executive chairman of Qualcomm Inc. (2014); Bob Iger, chairman and CEO of The Walt Disney Company (2013); Indra Nooyi, chairman and CEO of PepsiCo (2012); Peter Ueberroth, managing director of Contrarian Group (2011); Frederick W. Smith, chairman, president and CEO of FedEx (2010); Kenneth Chenault, chairman and CEO of American Express (2009); and Howard Schultz, chairman, president and CEO of Starbucks (2008).

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November 18-22, 2019

Celebrating International Education Week at UCLA

International Education Week (IEW) is a joint initiative of the U.S. Departments of State and Education dedicated to international education and exchange worldwide. The 2019 IEW ran from November 18-22, 2019. For the fourth year in a row, the UCLA International Institute led a large-scale UCLA celebration of International Education Week to celebrate international education and exchange, campus diversity, global perspectives and global citizenship on campus. The week offered Bruins a multitude of opportunities to learn about various international educational programs, research and scholarships; discover a wide range of global volunteer and career opportunities; interact with alumni working in the international sphere; enjoy performances and activities reflecting the diversity of global cultures at UCLA; and engage in discussions with international students, faculty and university leaders. The UCLA International Institute, together with a team of campus partners, including UCLA Study Abroad, Dashew Center for International Students and Scholars, UCLA Residential Life and the UCLA Library planned a weeklong celebration of international education with 26 cosponsors, including the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management. This was the largest number of events ever organized on campus for IEW. The week showcased UCLA’s extensive international education resources that were informative, fun and intellectually stimulating including cultural performances, career events, fellowship information sessions and lectures on global issues. Featured events included information sessions on FLAS/Fulbright, leveraging the study abroad experience in the job search process, Peace Corps recruitment, the evolving cybersecurity policy landscape, and a discussion on what being a global citizen means in 2019 as well as an alumni panel discussion on careers in a globalized world. As part of IEW, on Tuesday, November 19, the Center for Global Management also hosted a lunchtime discussion on “The Value of Authenticity in Global Business” with Aaron Walton, co-founder and CEO, Walton Isaacson. Moderated by Dean Antonio Bernardo, this event was part of the CGM’s Robertson Lecture Series on Global Business Leadership and also proudly featured as part of this year’s UCLA Anderson Embracing Diversity Week too.

Later that evening, the “UCLA Global Conversation,” the featured event of UCLA’s celebration of IEW took place in UCLA’s Powell Library which attracted the largest audience: 140 students, faculty, staff, deans, vice chancellors and vice provosts from across the university. To mark the occasion of UCLA's Centennial, Chancellor Gene Block spoke about the importance of global education in the 21st century and UCLA’s efforts in the area. This was followed by a moderated discussion with Jayathi Murthy, dean of UCLA’s Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science. Welcome and introductory remarks were provided by Cindy Fan, vice provost for international studies and global engagement. Chancellor Block said at the event that he thinks it’s beneficial for students to immerse themselves in a culture that challenges their perspectives, adding that some of the best work is done in diverse environments. He described global access as UCLA’s ability to serve as a home for students from all over the world and said adopting a global perspective isn’t limited to studying abroad. He added that UCLA’s diverse environment and international student body allow international interaction without having to leave campus. He also shared two initiatives that UCLA is working on in order to leave a larger global footprint: creating a sustainable community and reducing the burden of clinical depression. Both of these goals make up the university’s Grand Challenges. Work, research and culture in the world are increasingly global in nature — a reality clearly apparent on our campus. UCLA is not only remarkable for the diversity of its faculty and student body, but for the breadth of its scope and impact. Bruins pursue undergraduate and graduate international studies in a broad swathe of disciplines, one out of four UCLA undergraduates study abroad, a large percentage of faculty and students conduct research on global issues, and international students and visiting scholars bring unique perspectives to our classrooms. UCLA Alumni Association chapters, moreover, are active in countries all over the globe. One of the major goals of vice provost Cindy Fan is to enable as many UCLA students as possible — regardless of discipline or major — to gain international experience via campus classes, study abroad programs and international research, internships and/or work opportunities. Those experiences change students’ lives, give them a broader perspective on the world and prepare them, as future leaders, to address the many global problems that require collaborative solutions. All of these goals, together with the campus units that support them, are celebrated during International Education Week.

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Thursday, November 21, 2019 4.30-6.30 p.m., North Terrace

2019 Fall International Food Festival – Celebrating Diversity while Taking Taste Buds on a World Tour!

On November 21, 2019, students from the International Business Association (IBA) organized UCLA Anderson’s largest food festival - International Food Festival Fall 2019 (IFF Fall 2019). This annual tradition, supported by the Center for Global Management, Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, MBA Student Affairs and ASA, showcases, celebrates and embraces the international culture and diversity of UCLA Anderson through a universal form of expression — food. The event was held on the North Terrace in place of Anderson Afternoons and was featured as part of UCLA Anderson’s Embracing Diversity Week’s programming. The beautiful ambience was spiced up as UCLA Anderson students from different countries gathered together to experience different cultures through cuisines from all over the world. Adding to the ambience were decorations – the false roof created by bright lights and international mini flags. Stalls decorated with regional handiwork only added to the elegance of the event.

The celebration was attended by more than 300 current and prospective students from across UCLA Anderson’s various degree programs, faculty and staff as well as friends and family. The event featured 14 different cuisines from India, China, Taiwan, Israel, Korea, Nigeria, Indonesia, Japan, France, Cuba, Greece, Italy, Argentina and other parts of Latin America. Host students, representing different student clubs at UCLA Anderson from around the world, sourced authentic food from some of the best restaurants across Los Angeles. Some students also dressed up in their country’s and/or region’s traditional attire and spent time conversing with the guests to explain the details of the food served such as special occasion when it is consumed and cooking ingredients and methods. While a collection of appetizers provided by the South Asian Business Association built up the appetite, desserts from the European Business Association made the atmosphere a bit sweeter. Cultural diversity was also on display through international music and student hosts sharing facts and customs about their own countries.

The Critics’ Choice Award for the best tables was judged on the basis of providing the best cultural experience. The decision was a difficult one to make. The two winners selected by judges from FTMBA Student Affairs and Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, included the Black Business Students Association for its chicken wings and puff puffs and the European Business Association for its assortment of macrons.

IBA is grateful to the Center for Global Management, the Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, ASA and MBA Student Affairs for supporting the event and ensuring that UCLA Anderson remains an open and inclusive environment that embraces, celebrates and values diversity. In addition to the IBA, participating student clubs included: South Asian Business Association, Japan America Business Association, Anderson Christian Fellowship, Strategy & Operations Management Association, Anderson Latino Management Association, Greater China Business Association, Korean Business Student Association, European Business Association, Southeast Asia Business Association, Jewish Business Student Association, Asian Management Student Association, Black Business Students Association, Anderson Eats, and AnderTech.

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Tuesday, November 19, 2019 11:30am-12.30pm, Korn Convocation Hall

Robertson Lecture Series on Global Business Leadership with Aaron Walton, co-founder and CEO, Walton Isaacson, on “The Value of Authenticity in Global Business”

On Tuesday, November 19, 2019, the Center for Global Management hosted Aaron Walton, co-founder and CEO of the powerhouse global advertising agency Walton Isaacson, for a fireside chat with Tony Bernardo, dean and John E. Anderson Chair in Management. During a moderated conversation, Walton offered his insights on authenticity and diversity as keys to breakthrough impact for both consumers and employees. He spoke about authenticity and its value in global business, the importance of giving people a voice and the power that diversity has to grow businesses. Drawing on the professional experience he has developed over the past 25+ years, Walton shared stories of the business experiences that unleashed his own inspiring individual style, and offered his thoughts about the kinds of global experiences that may best prepare today’s leaders to thrive in increasingly dynamic and diverse organizations. A private luncheon followed in the executive dining where discussions continued. Walton’s boundless creativity and strategic acumen have made him one of the most admired executives throughout the advertising, brand marketing and entertainment industries. He received the Lifetime Achievement Award at the 2019 Multicultural Media Luncheon during the North American International Auto show and was named a Pride Legacy Leader by Business Equality magazine. He was also honored in 2017 by the American Association of Advertising Agencies as one of the 100 People Who Make Advertising Great. In 2013, Walton was elected to the Ebony Magazine “POWER 100” list, an award given to the nation’s most influential Americans from the worlds of religion, business, media and the creative arts. WI was founded in 2005 in partnership with famed NBA superstar and entrepreneurial legend, Earvin “Magic” Johnson. The company’s mission has been a breakout success, leading to inventive and dynamic business relationships with brands and organizations including Lexus, Wells Fargo, Spalding, McDonald’s, NYPD, and Macy’s. Around 250 UCLA and UCLA Anderson students, alumni, faculty, staff as well as members of the Los Angeles World Affairs Council & Town Hall and the Los Angeles community registered for the event that took place in UCLA Anderson’s Korn Convocation Hall. Opening remarks were provided by Ezra Glenn, MBA candidate from the Class of 2020 and the Anderson Student Association VP for Diversity, Inclusion and Community. The event which was part of the CGM’s Robertson Lecture Series on Global Business Leadership, organized by the Center for Global Management, supported by the Los Angeles World Affairs Council & Town Hall and proudly featured as part of this year’s UCLA Anderson Embracing Diversity Week and UCLA International Education Week.

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Wednesday, November 6, 2019 4:30 – 6:00 PM

“Israel’s Technology Economy: Origins and Impact,” UCLA Anderson School of Management

In his book, Israel’s Technology Economy: Origins and Impact (Palgrave Mcmillan, 2018), David Rosenberg documents how Israel emerged as one of the world’s leading centers of high technology over the last three decades and the impact that it has had, or failed to have, on the wider economy and politics. Based on the study of start-up companies, Rosenberg attributes the rise of Israel’s tech economy to its unique history, political system, and culture, and shows how those same factors have failed it in the quest to diversify Israel’s economy to make it more inclusive and equitable. On Wednesday, November 6, in the late afternoon, over 50 students, faculty and members of the local community enjoyed a presentation and discussion with Haaretz journalist David Rosenberg on his new book and the topics that it addressed. Stuart Gabriel, Arden Realty Chair and Professor of Finance who leads the Center for Global Management’s technology-focused global immersion courses to Israel, introduced the discussion. Rosenberg is economics editor and columnist for the Haaretz newspaper (English edition). He previously served as Bureau Chief for Bloomberg News and Business Editor for The Jerusalem Post. This event was organized by the Younes and Soraya Nazarian Center for Israel Studies and co-sponsored by the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management.

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Wednesday, November 6, 2019 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM, Dean’s Conference Room

Lunch Series on “The Transpacific Experiment: How China and California Collaborate and Compete for Our Future” with author, Matt Sheehan

Tensions between the world’s superpowers are mounting in Washington, D.C. and Beijing. Yet the People’s Republic of China and the state of California have built deep and interdependent socioeconomic exchanges that reverberate across the globe, and these interactions make California a microcosm of the most important international relationship of the twenty-first century. On Wednesday, November 6, UCLA hosted Matt Sheehan for an interactive lunchtime conversation on his new book, The Transpacific Experiment. Through rich reporting in his home state of California and a perspective gleaned from years of living and reporting in China, Kai-Fu Lee, former president of Google China described the book as “a must-read” as “Sheehan cuts right to the heart of the relationship between Silicon Valley and China: the tangled history, the current tensions, and the uncertain future.” Sheehan’s on-the-ground reporting reveals movie sets in the “Hollywood of China,” Chinese-funded housing projects in San Francisco, Chinese immigrants who support Donald Trump, and more. Each of these stories lays bare the new reality of twenty-first-century superpowers: the closer they get to one another, the more personal their frictions become. The lunchtime discussion, facilitated by Jerry Nickelsburg, adjunct professor and director of the UCLA Anderson Forecast addressed the issues and topics that the book raised and more and stimulated many fascinating and thought-provoking questions from students in UCLA Anderson’s full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs. Sheehan also discussed the role of California and its importance to the new era of U.S.-China relations, the transformation of Shenzhen and the rise of TikTok, a consumer social media platform in China with global currency. Matt Sheehan is a non-resident fellow at The Paulson Institute’s think tank, MacroPolo, where he researches the growing ties between the two places he has called home: California and China. Sheehan grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area and spent over five years living in mainland China. He served as the first China correspondent for The WorldPost and is fluent in spoken and written Mandarin Chinese. Sheehan’s writing has been published in Vice News, Foreign Policy, and The Atlantic. He is based in Oakland, California. The luncheon was organized by the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management and supported by the Greater China Business Association.

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Thursday, October 31, 2019 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM, Dean’s Conference Room

Lunch Series with Javier Guzman, Vice Governor of the Central Bank of Mexico on “Mexico’s Economic Outlook and Monetary Policy”

On Thursday, October 31, UCLA welcomed to campus Javier Guzman, vice governor of the Central Bank of Mexico. He was joined by Marlen Marroquin, executive regional director at the U.S.-Mexico Chamber of Commerce California Regional Chapter. Following a meeting with Chris Erickson, senior associate vice provost and director of the UCLA International Institute and professor Ruben Hernandez-Leon, director of the Center for Mexican Studies, students from the full-time, executive and fully employed MBA programs, including many from Mexico, Peru and Brazil together with Ph.D. and masters students studying Latin American, Chicana and Chicano studies as well as sociology had a unique opportunity to hear from the vice governor during an interactive lunchtime conversation organized by UCLA Anderson’s Latin American Business Association and Center for Global Management.

During the luncheon, Guzman provided an overview of the general situation in Mexico, including the economic outlook for the country and its relations with the U.S. He also discussed monetary policy and the important role of the Central Bank in the financial stability of the country. Various topics were also addressed including trade and the USMCA, as well as political and geopolitical problems globally that are creating an atmosphere of uncertainty. Guzman also explained what Mexico is facing on the domestic front. He addressed Mexico’s economic activity which has been declining and the uncertainty that is coming from both domestic and external factors, as well as the perception of country risk. The luncheon provided a terrific opportunity for students to hear insights, perspectives and deep knowledge around these critical topics from such a prominent and accomplished figure in Mexico. Guzman has served in this role since February, 2013 and will remain in the position through December, 2020. From 1994 to 1999, he served as an advisor, alternate executive director, and executive director at the International Monetary Fund, representing Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Spain, and Venezuela. He also worked as an advisor for Ernesto Zedillo, former President of Mexico, in the High Level Group on Financing for Development, established by the UN Secretary General in support of the International Conference on Financing for Development in Monterrey. In 2008, the Center for Latin American Studies’ (CEMLA) Assembly elected Guzman general director of that institution. He held that position from January 2010 to February 2013. Guzman is also the author of many articles in international trade and finance, foreign debt, capital flight, monetary and exchange rate policy, and international organizations, among others. The luncheon was organized by UCLA Anderson’s Latin American Business Association and Center for Global Management and supported by the United States-Mexico Chamber of Commerce California Regional Chapter.

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Tuesday, October 29, 2019 9:00 AM

OUE U.S. Bank Tower Asia’s Future is Now

For years, Western observers and media have been talking about the rise of Asia in terms of its massive and future potential. But the time has come for the rest of the world to update its thinking. The question is no longer how quickly the region will rise; it is how Asia will lead. To enable business leaders to better develop new strategies and thrive in the Asian Century, on Tuesday, October 29, the Asia Society Southern California collaborated with the McKinsey Global Institute (MGI), featuring expert perspectives to discuss Asia’s future. The morning discussion featured Jeongmin Seong, senior fellow at the MGI who shared insights from McKinsey’s research series on the Future of Asia. Seong leads MGI’s research teams in China, working on global as well as China-focused themes. He deciphered the region’s many facets, from trade flows and the corporate ecosystem to technology and the Asian consumer. Expert panelists included Walter Wang, head of operations at TSM and Terry Kramer, adjunct professor and faculty director of UCLA Anderson’s Easton Technology Management Center who teaches the CGM’s global immersion course focused on technology transformation in China. The discussion was moderated by Ira Kasoff, a board member of the Asia Society Southern California. The Center for Global Management supported a number of executive, fully employed and full-time MBA students to attend the discussion and learn more about expert perspectives on the Asian Century and how Asia, more than any other region of the world will shape the next phase of globalization.

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Thursday, October 24, 2019, 6:30 PM-9:00 PM

Global Business & Policy Forum BREXIT: The Future of the City of London and Implications for the Global Economy,” UCLA Anderson School of Management

Great Britain is in crisis. Its government is divided over the nation’s withdrawal from the European Union (EU), known as Brexit, and has been unable to agree on an approach to the country’s biggest peacetime decision in decades. A fervent proponent of withdrawal, Britain’s Prime Minister Boris Johnson suspended parliament and critics have accused the Conservative leader of using the five-week suspension to avoid democratic scrutiny as he bids to deliver his pledge to bring the United Kingdom out of the European Union by October 31, with or without a deal. What ultimately emerges could determine the shape of Britain and its place in the world for decades. The Fed has explicitly mentioned Brexit uncertainty as one potential factor weighing on the U.S. outlook and a no-deal Brexit could cause a period of volatility in global financial markets. How did the UK get to this point? What is the future facing London, the UK and the EU? If the pound falls sharply in response to no-deal, what are the implications for the U.S., the U.K.’s largest single-country trading partner. On October 24, the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management and UCLA School of Law's Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy hosted its inaugural global business and policy forum of the academic year.

CGM founding board member, Toby Raymond (’86), managing director, Access Equity Management Ltd. who relocated to London in 1992 and has since worked in London’s global financial markets addressed these questions and more to provide insights and perspectives on the future of Europe and what Brexit means for the United States and the world. He provided an overview on the trajectory and timeline of EU treaties and events in Europe, including expansion of the EU in 2004, the global financial crisis in 2008 and the Greek sovereign debt crisis in 2011. He addressed EU-UK interactions, including the referendum to join the EEC in 1974 and the Maastricht treaty in 1992. Raymond also discussed pertinent events in the UK, such as the economic crisis in 1976, the big bang and deregulation of UK financial markets in 1986, the Good Friday Agreement in 1999 and then the UKIP, EU referendum in 2016. Then, during a moderated conversation with Sebastian Edwards, Henry Ford II Chair in International Management, Raymond touched on some of the key issues for Brexit and the EU, including voter grievances, the customs union, immigration and freedom of movement, sovereignty and political independence as well as the dissatisfaction with the EU bureaucracy. Over dinner, there were many interactive table conversations where specific questions were discussed among the students, including: What will the financial services industry looks like five years from now – in the UK and globally? How are the regulatory and political constraints impacting the financial services industry and what will be the impact of technology? Students were also asked to comment on how the issues and contexts that have emerged in the UK during the Brexit referendum and process are being reflected around the world and whether this is specific to the UK or similar in other countries? The discussion engaged 90 students and faculty from the UCLA Anderson School of Management and the UCLA School of Law. The Global Business and Policy Forum is a collaborative partnership between UCLA Anderson’s Center for Global Management and the UCLA School of Law's Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy.

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Thursday, October 24, 2019, 4.30pm Anderson Afternoon North Terrace

Celebrating Diwali at UCLA Anderson

To celebrate the international diversity of UCLA Anderson, the Center for Global Management actively supports cultural events hosted by international student clubs such as the South Asian Business Association (SABA). SABA promotes familiarity and understanding of the South Asian culture and traditions among Anderson students during their annual flagship event, the Diwali Festival. Diwali or Deepavali is the festival of lights that marks the victory of good over evil. It is celebrated every year in the fall, usually in the months of October and November in the northern hemisphere (spring in the southern hemisphere). On October 24, 2019, over 350 domestic and international students attended the weekly Anderson Afternoons which was transformed by SABA to celebrate the Diwali Festival. UCLA Anderson’s North Terrace was decorated with diyas (lamps), traditional Indian food was served, and members of SABA were dressed in traditional Indian attire. Various aspects of the Indian culture were on display with performances of a Bhangra dance and a Bollywood dance showcase by SABA members. Other activities to engage the over 350 attendees included a mehndi/henna hand tattoo stall and showcase of ‘rangoli’ (colorful art). Earlier in the day, Indian sweets were distributed by SABA members to all five sections of first year full-time MBA classes to begin the celebration of Diwali and help educate classmates of the history of the festival.

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Monday, October 21, 2019 11:30 AM

City Club Los Angeles LA: The Global City with Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti

During a Los Angeles World Affairs Council & Town Hall lunchtime conversation at the City Club Los Angeles on Monday, October 21, Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti joined moderator Terry McCarthy, former president, Los Angeles World Affairs Council, for a moderated discussion on Los Angeles as a premier global city and international gateway for the 2028 Summer Olympics. He described the benchmarks for a safe, livable and prosperous global city, the role that climate change plays and also addressed the homelessness issue in the city and the importance of housing, infrastructure and transportation. Mayor Garcetti is a fourth generation Angeleno and the 42nd Mayor of Los Angeles. His Agenda is focused on creating a safe, livable, and prosperous city. As a member of the LAWAC, the Center for Global Management supports attendance of UCLA Anderson students to LAWAC discussions and events.

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Tuesday, October 15, 2019 11:30 AM Millennium Biltmore Hotel, Downtown Los Angeles

The Value of an Inclusive Economy with Mary C. Daly, President & CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco

America’s economic expansion is now in its tenth year. Unemployment rates are near historic lows. Does this mean the U.S. economy has reached its full potential? Not quite. Data tells us that considerable talent is still being left on the table – from rural populations with limited job opportunities to lower-income Americans struggling to access education. On Tuesday, October 15, Mary C. Daly, president and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco addressed the Los Angeles World Affairs Council & Town Hall during a luncheon at the Biltmore Hotel on “The Value of an Inclusive Economy.” Daly discussed the value of having these communities more fully participating in our economy – and why inclusive success is essential to America's future economic competitiveness. The Center for Global Management is a member of the LAWAC & Town Hall who generously invited UCLA Anderson students to attend the special luncheon on this important issue. Mary C. Daly became the thirteenth president and chief executive officer of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco on October 1, 2018. She joined the San Francisco Fed in 1996 as a research economist and held positions of increasing responsibility, including vice president, group vice president, and senior vice president and associate director of research. She became the Bank’s executive vice president and director of research in 2017.

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Tuesday, October 15, 2019 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM Executive Dining Room

Lunch Series on “The Global Media and Entertainment Industry” with Jon Niermann (’95), President and CEO, Loop Media, Inc.; Founder, FarWest Entertainment; Former President, The Walt Disney Coo. Asia-Pacific and Former President, Electronic Arts, Asia Pacific

On Tuesday, October 15, the Center for Global Management welcomed to campus, Jon Niermann (’95), a member of the CGM’s advisory board and alumnus of the FEMBA program. Niermann built his entertainment career of over 30 years with The Walt Disney Company and Electronic Arts, prior to starting his own media companies, FarWest Entertainment (2010), a multi-platform (television, music, live, animation, digital) media and entertainment company that focused on bridging Asia-inspired content with Western themes in addition to bringing Western formats to Asia; and Loop Media, Inc. (2016), a premium short-form video streaming service for public venues that provides music videos to businesses in all 50 states and plans to expand internationally and launch a consumer service in 2020. The company recently announced plans for an initial public offering in the fall of 2019. The luncheon provided an opportunity for MBA students across degree programs and class years who are pursuing the global management specialization and/or are members of UCLA Anderson’s Entertainment Management Association (EMA) to meet with Niermann in an informal and interactive setting and hear about his career trajectory post UCLA Anderson, his thoughts and insights on the global media and entertainment industry, as well as his experiences working on the business and creative sides of large companies and then venturing into the entrepreneurial world full-time with his own media companies. During the luncheon, he highlighted some of his projects over the years, including his “on camera” roles and Asia’s only Pan-Asian music countdown radio program “Asia Pop 4.” He shared his experiences living and working in Asia where he was based for almost 15 years and also discussed his latest venture with Loop Media, which in 2018, purchased Screenplay Entertainment and now has the world’s largest music video and movie trailer libraries. Niermann shared words of wisdom with students interested in entering the many different facets of the media and entertainment space and highlighted the importance of networking, relationships and partners when entering markets.

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Thursday, October 10, 2019 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM Dean's Conference Room

Lunch Series on "Female Entrepreneurship in the European Union: A Comparison with the United States" - A discussion with successful female entrepreneurs and a politician from Lithuania and the E.U.

On Thursday, October 10, the Center for Global Management hosted a luncheon with Ruta Miliute, Kristina Laima Alekniene and Ieva Zumiene, three successful female leaders from the European Union who have pursued the entrepreneurial and/or political path. The luncheon provided an opportunity for interested MBA students to meet with three successful and driven leaders from the European Union who shared their own successful career trajectories and discussed what it means to start a business in one country and then extend to the greater European Union, home to 24 official languages with different cultures and traditions. From their own different perspectives and diverse ventures, they also shared their thoughts and insights on the differences and similarities between starting a business in the E.U. versus the U.S. They described the shift that is happening in their home country and region with mentalities, cultures and traditions that are so different and shared thoughts on how to best navigate and take advantage of the shift. Miliute is a member of the Parliament of Lithuania and was the country’s youngest ever Member of Parliament; Alekniene is managing director of Inova Experts and co-founder and managing director of the International Business Women Network; and Zumiene is co-owner and CEO of Z.I.M. Way, a trading company that specializes in manufacturing and exporting quality linen textile specialties. The luncheon was organized by the Center for Global Management and supported by the Women’s Business Connection, Entrepreneur Association and European Business Association.

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Tuesday, September 10, 2019, UCLA Anderson

Celebrating the Mid-Autumn Festival at UCLA Anderson

On September 10, 2019, to help the UCLA Anderson community better understand traditions of classmates, students from full-time MBA Class of 2021 joined with their sections to celebrate Mid-Autumn Festival, one of the most important events on the Lunar Calendar that represents the reunion of families. First-year students from each section, with the guidance from members of Anderson Eats and the Greater China Business Association (GCBA), served as volunteer organizers, using introductory videos and Q&As to educate classmates about the origin of the festival as well as associated folk legends and traditions. More than 200 students also sampled mooncakes, the signature pastry typically filled with sweet-bean or lotus-seed paste, synonymous with Mid-Autumn Festival as they enjoyed learning more about the traditional festival. With the feel of a family gathering, which is the essence of the festival the event generated tremendous interest and excitement. It created an interactive opportunity for new first-year students to forge closer bonds with each other while increasing awareness of the cultural diversity of the UCLA Anderson community. This inaugural edition of the event was organized by the GCBA and Anderson Eats, and supported by the Office of Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, Center for Global Management, and MBA Student Affairs.

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Tuesday, September 3, 2019, London, UK

Students Enjoy Lunch with CGM Founding Board Member, Toby Raymond (’86) While on Exchange at London Business School

During the summer, around 50 FEMBA and EMBA students participated in one-week exchanges at eight partner schools around the world. During two alternative one-week block sessions in August and September, nine students (5 FEMBA and 4 EMBA) studied at London Business School. They took courses such as private equity and venture capital, strategies for growth, brand management, strategic innovation, and energy: markets, models and strategies. On Tuesday, September 3, Nathan Kwok, Abhinav Pande and Vikram Saurabh from the EMBA Class of 2020 together with Ria Malhan and Michael Nam from the FEMBA Class of 2020 had an opportunity to enjoy lunch at the Landmark Hotel in Marylebone with CGM founding board member, Toby Raymond (’86), managing director of Access Equity Management Ltd. Raymond relocated to London in 1992 to work as a market maker in financial derivatives products, where he established futures arbitrage and proprietary trading programs for an international trading firm. Raymond began advising on alternative asset investments in 1997 and established Access Equity Management Limited in 2000. The luncheon at London’s iconic Landmark Hotel provided a wonderful opportunity for our exceptional students to hear firsthand about European business and markets from a distinguished and accomplished global leader as well as understand more about Brexit and the future facing London. They were also joined by London-based Matthew Daines, UCLA’s executive director of development for Europe.

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Sunday, September 1 – Sunday, September 8, 2019

28 students visit Peru for the CGM’s global immersion course, “From Emerging Market to One of the World’s Fastest Growing Economies: Transformation of the Peruvian Economy and Business Opportunities,” led by Sebastian Edwards, Henry Ford II Chair in International Management

In September during summer break, 28 students from UCLA Anderson’s full-time and fully employed MBA programs visited Lima and Cusco for the in-country week of the CGM’s global immersion course, “From Emerging Market to One of the World’s Fastest Growing Economies: Transformation of the Peruvian Economy and Business Opportunities,” led by distinguished professor and Latin American expert Sebastian Edwards, Henry Ford II Chair in International Management. This was the fourth global immersion course to visit Peru and the second to be led by Edwards.

During the course, students learned the way in which economic policy in Peru – one of the most successful countries in Latin America in the last decade – affects business opportunities. An important feature of the course was that it put Peru’s case in context with that of the rest of the Latin American nations (with special mention to Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Chile and Venezuela). The course also analyzed the way in which politics affects both economics and policy. Before the in-country week, on-campus class sessions addressed some of the most important economic, business, social and political aspects of the country, cultural issues as well as social and business challenges. During the week in Peru, students heard from prominent business leaders, academics, politicians and senior policy makers, as well as successful entrepreneurs. A number of Davos-style conversations and moderated conversations helped illuminate Peru’s economics and business environments with a particular focus on sectors that are key to the Peruvian economy. Students also met with and had the opportunity to hear from successful UCLA Anderson alumni. They thoroughly enjoyed their time in-county, learned a great deal, were inspired, met good friends and enjoyed a truly immersive and memorable experience together. The week also concluded with a visit to the most familiar icon of Inca civilization - Machu Picchu.

On the first day in Lima, the inaugural speakers provided terrific context and foundation. At the Central Bank, students heard from Renzo Rossini, general manager who provided an excellent overview of Peru’s fundamentals and economic outlook, including vis-à-vis Latin America. He addressed growth, inflation and the reduction of poverty since 2002 and explained that after hyperinflation in the late 1980s and early 1990s, monetary policy was reformed and inflation decreased dramatically. Cesar Martin Menaranda, head of the investor services division at Proversion, discussed promoting private investments in public infrastructure through private-public partnerships (PPP). Proversion is a public executing agency, attached to the Ministry of Economy and Finance, that promotes the incorporation of private investment in public services and public infrastructure works. He talked about the various projects that the organization is involved with, ranging from sanitation to energy and mines and from education to tourism and culture. Students also heard from Antonio Menchelli, CEO of Urbanova Inmobilaria, the real estate arm of the Peruvian conglomerate, Breca. The company has been a major player in the development of Lima and firmly believes in sustainability.

During the week, students learned about the main sectors of importance to the Peruvian economy. The mining sector is, and has always been the key to the country’s economy. Peru has 13% of the world's copper reserves, 4% of its gold, 22% of its silver, 7.6% of zinc, 9% of lead and 6% of tin reserves, according to the most recent data of the Peru's Ministry of Energy and Mines. Students heard from Raul Benavides, vice president of Buenaventura, a Peruvian precious metals company engaged in the mining and exploration of gold, silver and other metals and the first mining company in Latin American to be listed in New York. Benavides described how mining is evolving from an industry that was very aggressive to the environment to one that is regulated with better parameters. He explained how companies such as Buenaventura are dealing with social and political challenges that did not exist when his father established company. After mining, the fishery sector is the most important sector in Peru. Students visited the TASA fishing plant. TASA is a leading Peruvian company in the fishing sector and the first producer and exporter of fishmeal and fish oil in the world. The company has contributed to reducing poverty, increasing GDP, creating full employment and foreign exchange. At TASA, Cayetana Aljovin, chairwoman at Sociedad Nacional de Pesqueria spoke about anchovy fishing in Peru. Anchovy fishing is the dominant catch in the country and has been recognized worldwide as an industry that respects the environment and works for the sustainability of the resources. Students had the opportunity to tour the plant and learn about the process of fish meal and fish oil. They also visited the control room to understand how NIR analysis provides rapid analysis data for better decision making in food and agri-production processes.

Peru's climate and different geographical zones also make it an important agricultural nation. Diego Acosta, category manager at Agricola Cerro Prieto (ACP) addressed agribusiness in Peru. ACP is engaged in the production, packaging, and marketing of high quality agricultural products, including avocados, table grapes, green asparagus and organic blueberries, four crops that allow for continuous cash flow throughout the year. Peru is a major supplier of crops such as asparagus because of its unique climate. Initially, many were of the opinion that blueberries could not grow and thrive in Peru as a fruit, but now Peru is one of the world’s biggest producers and exporters in the world. Since Peru enjoys the ability to ship its fruit by sea, producers have also been able to gain a substantial margin on sales. The Peruvian textile history began five thousand years ago when weavers from pre-Inca and Inca cultures mastered the natural fibers of cotton and alpaca. Today, Peru's textile industry employs approximately 250,000 people, and textiles and garment manufacturers account for more than 30 percent of the non-traditional exports in Peru. Peru produces some of the best cotton in the world and is renowned for its superior fiber length, strength, and consistency. The country also provides 80% of the world's supply of alpaca wool. Students learned more about the sector from Eduardo Elias, president of Textile Sourcing Company (TSC), a Peruvian integrated company founded in 2012 from former Textil San Cristobal S.A., as part of the biggest textile group in Perú. TSC is a full vertical operation from spinning to knitting, dyeing, cutting, sewing, packing, shipping and delivery which allows the company to have the shortest supply model in the region. He described the three drivers of value: quality, design and brand and talked about pricing and manpower management and the impact of exchange rate fluctuations. He also described how China and e-commerce are hurting the Peruvian textile industry and the impact of automation and AI.

Peru produces 30,000 tonnes of solid waste per day – 50% organic, 25% recyclables (not organic) and 25% non-recyclables. However, only around 3% of the recyclables is recovered today in Peru. Pipo Reiser, co-founder of Sinba, a social enterprise working with the Peruvian culinary sector explained how one restaurant generates the equivalent waste of 100 households and shared with students how Sinba creates solutions to help improve waste management and formalize waste collections. Students later had the opportunity to learn about financial inclusion from Adriana Chavez, CFO at MiBanco. The company was founded in 1998 as the first Peruvian bank to specialize in micro-finance. MiBanco offers products and services oriented to the micro and small enterprises, such as working capital, fixed assets, scope and commercial store building credits, fixed term savings, money exchange and money transfer to other countries. Students learned how MiBanco uses behavioural finance and is in the evolution of its business model, using technology for greater efficiency.

Students visited UTEC Ventures. Founded in 2014, UTEC Ventures is the edtech startup accelerator of the University of Engineering and Technology and is seen as one of the main contributors to the Peruvian startup ecosystem. Professor Edwards moderated a conversation on innovation initiatives in Peru and the entrepreneurial ecosystem with three entrepreneurial-minded panelists. Jose Deustua, managing director at UTEC Ventures was joined by Daniella Raffo, managing director at Aporta, the social innovation laboratory of the Breca group that works with the Group’s business units to maximize their social and environmental impact on stakeholders and uses the power of business for a force for good; and UCLA Anderson alumna Yvonne Quiñones (’15), co-founder and CEO at Urbaner, a platform that redefines logistics and gives companies access deliveries on demand. Students heard how much harder it is for companies to get funding in Peru versus the U.S. and how in general, women entrepreneurs seem to perform better. Students really appreciated hearing inspiring stories of entrepreneurs and especially two successful female entrepreneurs. Students also had the opportunity to hear from another successful UCLA Anderson alumnus Marco Moreno (‘01), managing partner at Creuza Advisors who hosted the group at his office. Moreno talked about the country’s transformation. He described Peru from 1985-1990 and then from 1990-2018 under Alberto Fujimori and the five administrations post Fujimori and explained that while they had different ideologies, the economic model remained the same. He touched on Peru’s investment landscape and explained that the VC ecosystem is in its early stages and that private equity has a limited track record. He also discussed the contagion effect in Latin America. Hugo Santa Maria, chief economist and managing partner for economic studies at Apoyo Consulting also provided a terrific overview on the Peruvian economy. He discussed specifically the “crises” years (1980’s and early 1990’s); the deployment of a new economic model which was “market oriented” (the 1990’s); then the “rock star” years (2003-2013); resiliency under adversity (2013-2016); then the “what on earth is going on” years (2016-2020); and the obstacles that the country has to overcome, such as a dysfunctional political system, constant turnover of key government authorities, a lack of continuity in public policies, procrastination in decision making in the public administration that require “political capital,” and since public opinion is key, the risk of “microeconomic populism.”

A visit to Lima would not be complete without a visit to LUM, The Place of Memory, Tolerance and Social Inclusion that explores the 1980–2000 conflict between terrorist groups and Peru's government. LUM contains pivotal moments to understand the events between 1980 and 2000 and presents information on Shining Path (SL) and the Tupac Amaru Revolutionary Movement (MRTA), as the ones that sparked the violence, as well as showing the profound inequalities and the absence of the State that caused it to spread. Professor Edwards likes to incorporate an art/cultural session into the week which adds another dimension to the experience. At the LUM, students heard from Miguel Cruchaga, a Peruvian architect, intellectual and politician who talked about the country’s architectural history and explained the different styles in Lima throughout the years. He discussed the Huacas, incorporation of neo classical landmarks as in Europe and later the adoption of the international architectural style post 1940.

Peru is known for its gastronomy and is home to some of the best restaurants in the world. Peru has 28 of the 34 climates and 84 of the 114 microclimates of the world, influenced by factors such as the Andes and the ocean currents. In Lima, students visited the San Isidro market and were given a tour of the market by Ignacio Barrios, founder and owner of Urban Kitchen who explained the origins of Peruvian food and the importance of ingredients in modern Peruvian gastronomy. Following the tour, students visited Urban Kitchen for an evening culinary experience where they also learned the importance of history of Peruvian food and how it became one of the most important in the world. They divided into four groups to learn how to cook traditional Peruvian cebiche and lomo saltado, as well as causa with prawns and huancaina sauce and octopus and black olive sauce. Students also learned how to make the transitional Peruvian picso. UCLA Anderson alumni also joined the evening together with a student from the entering MSBA Class of 2020 who lives in Lima.

In Cusco, Carlos Milla, president at CARTUC, the regional Chamber of Tourism provided an overview of the tourism sector in Cusco and its impact on the local economy and discussed the sustainability of the current growth in the number of tourists visiting the Sacred Valley and Machu Picchu. Peru is highly dependent on Machu Picchu with 85% of inbound tourists visiting the site. He explained that the region experienced huge growth between 2008 and 2013. The growth of the middle class has also been remarkable however there is an important part of the population that is still vulnerable. Looking to the future, he sees huge potential in certain areas, including mining of lithium, hydro-energy, water basin management and tourism. He also sees poverty declining and more people being integrated into modern society. However, there are also some challenges, including corruption and the informal economy, among others. Cusco has also become an attractive market for retail investment due to its high rate of foreign tourists and development of modern spaces dedicated to transforming the quality of life of thousands of Cusqueñian families. Students heard from Patricia Guzman, sales and marketing coordinator at Real Plaza, the largest developer and operator of shopping centers in Peru about how the company has been a pioneer in bringing modernity and investment projects to provinces, transforming the quality of life of thousands of Peruvians and generating employment opportunities. The final speaker of the week was Heidy Aspilcueta, director of operations at Medlife, an NGO that partners with low-income communities in Latin America to improve their access to medicine, education, and community development initiatives. Cusco is surrounded by an indigenous population that continues to live in extreme poverty. Aspilcueta explained how Medlife partners with the local communities to improve access in these areas and help integrate the communities into the modern economy.

During their time in Lima and Cusco, students also enjoyed tours of each city. In Lima, students visited the historical colonial district and enjoyed a walking tour from Plaza Mayor, the birthplace of Lima which is surrounded by the Government Palace, Cathedral of Lima, Archbishop's Palace of Lima, the Municipal Palace, and the Palace of the Union. They toured Basílica y Convento de San Francisco which aside from a church and monastery, also contains a library and catacombs. They also visited the Adobe Pyramid Huaca Huallamarca, an archaeological site in Peru, located in the San Isidro district. In Cusco, students walked to Korikancha / Church and Convent of Santo Domingo. Possibly the most sacred and important building in the entire Inca Empire, Korikancha was the name given to the Inca Temple of the Sun. They toured the famous San Pedro local market and drove to Sacsayhuaman, a citadel on the northern outskirts of Cusco where they walked around the site and the best-known zone of Sacsayhuamán which includes its great plaza and its adjacent three massive terrace walls before embarking on a short walk to Cristo Blanco. The group ended the week with a visit to the most familiar icon of Inca civilization - Machu Picchu. Some students hiked up to Intipunku (Sun Gate), one of the most important archeological constructions around the Machu Picchu and others walked to the Inca Bridge. Everyone walked around the inside of the citadel and learned more detail around the history of Machu Picchu. Declared a Peruvian Historic Sanctuary in 1981 and a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1983, Machu Picchu was voted one of the New Seven Wonders of the World in a 2009 worldwide Internet poll. At the conclusion of the week, some students stayed a few extra days to hike in the mountains, others headed to various parts of Latin America while a number of students headed home with fond memories, new friends, alpaca gifts and a greater understanding and appreciation of Peru.

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Sunday, September 1 – Saturday, September 7, 2019

40 students visit Helsinki, Finland and Stockholm, Sweden for the CGM’s Global Immersion course “Entrepreneurship and Corporate Renewal in Scandinavia,” led by George Abe, lecturer in entrepreneurship

In September during the same time period, 40 current students from UCLA Anderson’s full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs also visited Finland and Sweden for the in-country week of another CGM global immersion course “Entrepreneurship and Corporate Renewal in Scandinavia.” Led by George Abe, lecturer in entrepreneurship, this was the second global immersion course to visit the Nordic countries. The course focused on government policy, particularly support for entrepreneurship, in sustaining the standard of living in Nordic countries by focusing on the economies of Finland and Sweden. The course also addressed the renewal, or not, of large private companies.

During the week, students heard from and engaged with many successful entrepreneurs and business leaders as well as visited many start-up and well-known companies. The week started in Helsinki. The inaugural presentation and discussion was with executives from Nordic Investment Bank, headquartered in the city, who provided an overview of the Finnish banking system and investments in entrepreneurship. NIB’s mission is to finance projects that improve the productivity and benefit the environment of the Nordic and Baltic countries. Its main lending areas include energy and water, infrastructure, industries and services and SMEs. This provided a great foundation and context for the presentations and visits that followed. Students visited Maria 01, located in an old hospital campus that was converted into a community campus and startup ecosystem. Founded in 2016 as a startup campus hub in Finland, Maria 01 is run as a nonprofit with a vision to provide everything a startup needs to build their company in one place. The idea is to help the Finnish tech ecosystem grow at scale and mature faster. Maria 01 is a selective tech incubator that hosts over 100 startups. It also is a VC hub hosting ten early-stage VCs active in Finland. A few accelerators also are tenants. Following a history and overview of Maria 01 delivered by the company’s COO, Atte Penttinen, students had the opportunity to hear from two successful Finnish entrepreneurs. Sampsa Siitonen, CEO of Witrafi, a company that focuses on parking technology, discussed how the company is changing the way we park to make car parking a positive experience and a sustainable activity. Rudi Skogman, CEO of Blok Enterprises, one of the fastest growing startups in Finland and the fastest growing real estate agency in the country, addressed the company's web-based platform which provides an online portal for the buying and selling of houses and renders traditional realtors redundant. In September 2017, Blok was chosen by Wired UK as one of "Europe's Hottest 100 Startups." The company is also part of the Finnish government’s flagship initiative, the KIRA-digi program, which supports new innovations and businesses in the real estate and construction sectors. Students also heard from Gabriele Aimone, CEO of Helsinki Games Factory, now the leading Finnish gamedev hub that provides services to the industry at large and office premises for 25 in-house game studios.

In Helsinki, students were hosted by UCLA Anderson’s GAP partner, Business Finland. As of January 1, 2018 Finpro – the Finnish trade promotion organization – and Tekes – the Finnish Funding Agency for Innovation – united as Business Finland. Business Finland is the most important public funding agency for research funding in Finland, and is directed by the Finnish Ministry of Employment and the Economy. Its mission is to catalyze new growth and create opportunities for the country through innovation and international expansion. The group also visited Aalto Start-up Center, a successful and fast developing business accelerator operating within Aalto University. To attract innovative growth companies, the center provides a platform for start-ups to accelerate their growth through combining all the forces that support entrepreneurship in the Helsinki metropolitan area. It offers modern workspace facilities, a wide range of development services and business advice, as well as an extensive network of experts. Following a brief introduction by Hakan Mitts, a senior lecturer with Aalto Ventures Program, the group was joined by three start-up companies who each gave a short 5-minute pitch to the students on their ideas, products and companies and presented their biggest challenge. The students then broke out into four groups for 20-minute roundtable discussions for some brainstorming with the start-ups. The final visit in Helsinki was to MaaS (Mobility as a Service) Global where Krista Huhtala-Jenks, its head of ecosystem and sustainability described how the company aims to bring all consumers means of travel to one easy place by giving them more options for transit through a single gateway. MaaS Global is behind the all-in-one mobility app, Whim which offers a subscription service for public transportation, ridesharing, bike rentals, scooter rentals, taxis or car rentals. The app basically optimizes the best mode for every journey and gives its users all city transport services in one step, letting them journey where and when they want with public transport, taxis, bikes, cars, and other options, all under a single subscription. Students also visited Nokia’s headquarters in Espoo and learned about innovation and intrapreneurship at Nokia.

Mid-week, the students transferred to Stockholm. The inaugural speaker was Christopher Kandimaa, former head of equity finance for Dankse Bank who spoke about “the Swedish model” and discussed the Swedish financial system, the Riksbanken and its role in fiscal and monetary policy. He also touched on Sweden’s macro economy, shadow banking, labor markets and how the tax system is structured, particularly as it affects entrepreneurs. This provided great context for the presentations and visits to some of the country’s best known and successful companies that followed. At King/Candycrush, Daniel Svärd, vice president and head of studio for the Candy Crush Saga and Charley Tesch, global communications manager provided an overview on King, its gaming success and the freemium model. King is an independent unit of Activision Blizzard Inc., which acquired the company in February 2016. It is a leading interactive entertainment company for the mobile world that gained fame after releasing the cross-platform title “Candy Crush Saga” in 2012, considered one of the most financially successful games utilizing the freemium model. At Spotify, Gustav Söderström, chief R&D officer talked about entrepreneurship in the music industry. Spotify transformed music listening forever when it launched in Sweden in 2008. Today, Spotify is the world’s most popular music streaming service and the largest driver of revenue to the music business. Students learned about the company's primary business, its audio streaming platform that provides digital rights management-protected music and podcasts from record labels and media companies. As a freemium service, basic features are free with advertisements or automatic music videos, while additional features, such as improved streaming quality, are offered via paid subscriptions. As of July 2019, Spotify had 232 million monthly active users, including 108 million paying subscribers. At Purple+/Telia, students learned about the country’s innovation in telecommunication services. They visited Telia Company, a dominant telecom and mobile network operator in Sweden and Finland and heard how Purple+, Telia’s digital innovation hub, addresses the challenges to protect Telia’s core business and unleash new growth opportunities and how it establishes dedicated business units to help these innovations grow.

During a fireside chat with Professor Abe, John Elvesjö, founder and former co-CEO of Tobii, a Swedish high-technology company talked about how Tobii develops and sells products for eye control and eye tracking. He spoke about how he raised initial funding for the company and the journey of Tobii going public and discussed Brightly Ventures, his new VC and PE firm that specializes in technology companies in the Nordic countries. Later in the week at WeWork’s new facilities in Stockholm, Kjell Håkan Närfelt, chief strategy officer of Sweden’s government innovation agency Vinnova addressed the group. By improving the conditions for innovation, as well as funding needs- driven research, he shared Vinnova’s vision for Sweden. Its vision is to become a world-leading country in research and innovation and an attractive place in which to invest and conduct business through the promotion of collaborations between companies, universities, research institutes and the public sector. Närfelt, who has been working with technology driven business development and R&D for more than 20 years also explained the funding process. Every year Vinnova invests about SEK 2 billion in various initiatives, including technology startup companies. At the end of the week, through a visit to Sana Labs students were fascinated and intrigued to learn how technology and artificial intelligence are disrupting the education sector. Founded in Stockholm in 2016, Sana Labs is an artificial intelligence company that applies recent breakthroughs in machine learning to personalize educational content to each student. In its full- stack machine learning platform, Sana Labs handles millions of content recommendations for education companies around the world.

During the week, students also met and networked with a number of entrepreneurs in more informal and interactive sessions. They enjoyed a Q&A session with three local resident entrepreneurs at SUP46 (SUP stands for Startup People of Sweden and 46 is the area code for Sweden). Founded in 2013, SUP46 is a co-working space and international hub for early-stage technology companies. After brief introductions of their companies, through interactive conversations with students, the entrepreneurs explained why they chose SUP46, elaborated on their business models and pricing structures and addressed the hurdles that they have faced. They also described the entrepreneurial environment and ecosystem in Sweden and why they believe Sweden has so many people who are keen to pursue entrepreneurial endeavors. UCLA Anderson alumnus Tobias Hummel (’06) also facilitated a panel of successful Swedish entrepreneurs who joined Professor Abe at Helio Kista for a fireside chat and who shared their own personal journey, success stories and the challenges they faced on the entrepreneurial path. This was followed by a networking reception for the students, entrepreneurs and alumni.

During their time, students also got to experience some of the culture and sights of Helsinki and Stockholm with two organized city tours. In Stockholm, they visited and wandered through Gamla Stan, one of the largest and best preserved medieval city centers in Europe, and one of the foremost attractions in Stockholm with its cobblestone streets and brightly painted buildings. Students enjoyed many famous landmarks including Riksdagshuset, the Swedish Parliament building; the Royal Palace on the waterfront; and the Storkyrkan, Stockholm’s Cathedral. Other highlights included the Vasa Swedish warship and the Nobel Prize Museum. In Helsinki, students visited landmarks such as Temppeliaukio Church, a Lutheran church in the Töölö neighborhood of Helsinki that is built directly into solid rock. They also visited Senate Square and learned about the beautiful buildings and neoclassical architecture and its surroundings which make up the oldest part of central Helsinki. The week concluded with a farewell dinner back in Gamla Stan. Some students extended their stay in Europe while others returned back to the United States with a greater understanding and appreciation of entrepreneurship and corporate renewal in the Nordic countries!

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Tuesday, August 20, 2019

The CGM Hosts an Evening of Networking with Students from ESSEC Business School’s EMBA and Digital Leadership Programs and UCLA Anderson’s FTMBA, FEMBA and UCLA-NUS EMBA Programs

The Center for Global Management welcomed around 50 students and faculty from the EMBA and Advanced Certificate in Digital Leadership programs at ESSEC Business School, France to UCLA Anderson from August 19-23, 2019 for a one-week global management seminar focused on “The Business of California.” The week provided participants with an opportunity to complete part of their studies at UCLA and gain valuable global experience and insights. The week focused on the innovation and creativity that are such an integral part of the business community in Los Angeles and California, including current academic research and business application around topics such entrepreneurship and idea generation, big data, technology and business model driven innovation, the regulatory landscape in the U.S., as well as designing and implementing a platform strategy. During the week, students visited the Walt Disney Studios, Disney Accelerator, Boston Scientific and the Getty Museum. On Tuesday, August 20, the students enjoyed a networking reception on the North Terrace, organized by the CGM where they had an opportunity to interact with faculty teaching during the week as well as meet and connect with students from UCLA Anderson’s FTMBA and FEMBA programs as well as the UCLA-NUS EMBA program who were on campus for the second week of their UCLA residencies.

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Monday, August 19, 2019

Discussion over Dinner on "Technology-Based Transformation of Shenzhen and Hong Kong – Implications Regionally and Globally,” UCLA Anderson School of Management

A notable transformation is occurring in Shenzhen and Hong Kong. This technology driven transformation has been enabled by Government policy, changes in consumer preferences and enterprise driven innovation. The Center for Global Management’s recent technology-focused global immersion course, led by Terry Kramer, adjunct professor and faculty director for the Easton Technology Management Center helped students to understand the dynamic growth of Shenzhen juxtaposed against the historic prosperity of Hong Kong. And in the process of understanding these two fascinating success stories, the course uncovered the "cause-and-effect" relationship of government policy and the changes in consumer preferences and technology in driving unique outcomes. Visits such as those with Tencent/WeChat, Foxconn, DJI, Mindray and Royole as well as other emerging artificial intelligence and fintech companies were important in telling the story and helped illuminate the region’s political, economic, and innovation-oriented environment, and the significant changes that have occurred over the last several decades.

On Monday, August 19, following a networking reception in the Marion Anderson Courtyard, Professor Kramer moderated a conversation with technology-oriented students/alumni from the Class of 2019 who participated in the course. Morgan Greenwald, partner marketing manager at Microsoft in Bellevue, joined via Zoom web conference and together with Ryan Tan, vice president of M&A and corporate planning at StarHub Ltd. in Singapore and Richard Tran, consulting services consultant at Neustar, Inc. shared insights and lessons learned from visits to these leading technology companies which demonstrated the notable transformation in the region and for China more broadly in areas such fintech, high-tech smart manufacturing, social media and internet services. Panelists examined the possible wider implications regionally and globally as well as key lessons learned drawing upon contextual leadership—identifying the “cause and effect” of the successes in the region and the likely future outcomes and areas of innovation. Panelists also shared their views on the impact of technology and unique context of Shenzhen and Hong Kong, views about their own countries in relation to this transformation and the opportunities and challenges presented as well as their own leadership learnings.

Professor Kramer also shared his own observations with the packed executive dining room full of engaged and interested current students, alumni, faculty and special guests who were also able to engage in the conversation through the Slido audience interaction tool. His observations that arose from the course included the notable case of rising outcomes/reduction of poverty; leapfrog innovation that was evident everywhere (e.g. mobile payments); Chinese companies are expanding product/service offerings domestically (often greater than international expansion); the notable role of government in driving adoption (e.g. 5G) and winners/losers. The role of data is massive and it was clear that Chinese consumers are very willing to share data and try new services and “China is advancing faster in the data driven world, then the U.S., then India, and then Europe.” Kramer also shared interesting observations from the team projects that the students completed during the course. Student team project innovations almost exclusively focused on large company innovations (e.g. Tencent) and these innovations focused almost exclusively on the Chinese market. There were requirements for scale and lesser focus on international opportunities in the near team. The role of government was also key and there are clearly advanced forms of technology (e.g. virtual assistants utilizing AI) being developed. Students identified less concern on required quantity and availability of data and there will be future of work considerations for China (as well as U.S.) too. It was interesting that Hong Kong was neither identified as a location for development of innovation nor as a target market.

Given the overwhelming demand for the course and interest in the topic, the Center for Global Management will be running a similar course with Professor Kramer in winter/spring 2020. The discussion was a collaboration between the Center for Global Management and Easton Technology Management Center and the UCLA-NUS Executive MBA program.

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Sunday, August 11, 2019, UCLA Anderson

The CGM Welcomes International Exchange Students from 8 Partner Universities and Hosts an Evening of Networking with UCLA Anderson’s EMBA, FEMBA and UCLA-NUS MBA Students

 

Managed through the Center for Global Management, one-week exchanges conducive to working students’ schedules are offered over the summer with international partner universities. In 2019, over 50 FEMBA and EMBA students are scheduled to participate in one-week exchanges at nine partner schools during the summer and in December. On Sunday, August 11, the CGM welcomed around 40 students from these same partner schools who joined classes with UCLA Anderson’s EMBA, FEMBA and UCLA-NUS EMBA students during a one-week block of elective courses. The CGM hosted an orientation for the students to learn more about Los Angeles, UCLA and UCLA Anderson, and partnered with the UCLA-NUS EMBA program in hosting a networking reception on UCLA Anderson’s North Terrace for students to network with peers from other top international business and management schools. A tour of the beautiful UCLA campus was also provided. Students from UCLA Anderson’s EMBA and FEMBA programs participating on exchange over the summer joined the networking reception. Some reconnected with students they had met earlier in the summer at their host institutions and also were introduced to new friends from schools they will soon be visiting on exchange. The one-week exchange block at UCLA Anderson coincided with the two-week UCLA residency for the UCLA-NUS EMBA program so there were tremendous opportunities for all students at UCLA Anderson to interact and network with peers from around the world during the week.

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Saturday, July 13, 2019 Dickson Plaza, UCLA

The CGM Engages with FEMBA and EMBA Admits at ‘Palooza 8

On Saturday, July 13, 2019, UCLA Anderson celebrated a tremendously successful ‘Palooza 8 which attracted around 1,500 people. The eighth annual fun-filled family event, formerly known as FEMBApalooza, was hosted by the FEMBA and EMBA programs. It was held on UCLA’s Dickson Plaza and served as the official welcome event of the entering FEMBA Class of 2022 and EMBA Class of 2021, and showcased the people, programs and available resources of UCLA Anderson.

In the spirit of One Anderson, the event brought together students and alumni from many of UCLA Anderson’s programs — full-time MBA, FEMBA, EMBA, UCLA-NUS EMBA, Ph.D. and MFE - and included members of the Classes of 1961, 1980 and 1982 and some 202 incoming FEMBA, EMBA and full-time MBA students from the recently admitted Classes of 2021 and 2020. Faculty, family and friends joined. Together with faculty from UCLA Anderson’s Behavioral Decision Making area who conducted Learning on the Lawn TEDx-type sessions, CGM executive director Lucy Allard Nelson (’06) highlighted he global courses and programming available to students both on campus and abroad, such as the global immersion and international exchange courses. The CGM also managed a ’Palooza 8 booth and the grand prize of the afternoon was a ’Palooza global immersion fellowship, which covers the program fee for the in-country component of a global immersion course. It was won by Naomi Chi from the FEMBA Class of 2021. Over the years, through the global immersion and international exchange courses as well as through GAP and SMR field studies, FEMBA and EMBA students have traveled to more than 45 countries.

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2018 - 2019

 
Thursday, May 16, 2019 5.00-8.00 p.m., North Terrace

2019 International Food Festival – Celebrating and Valuing Diversity while Taking Taste Buds on a World Tour!

On May 16, 2019, students from the International Business Association (IBA) organized UCLA Anderson’s largest food festival - International Food Festival 2019 (IFF-2019). This annual tradition, supported by the Center for Global Management, Office of Diversity, MBA Student Affairs and ASA showcases, celebrates and embraces the international culture and diversity of UCLA Anderson through a universal form of expression — food. The event was held on North Terrace in place of Anderson Afternoons and the beautiful ambience was spiced up as UCLA Anderson students from different countries gathered together to experience different cultures through cuisines from all over the world. Adding to the ambience were decorations, bright lights and miniature international mini flags. Stalls decorated with regional handiwork only added to the elegance of the event.

The celebration was attended by more than 280 students from across UCLA Anderson’s various degree programs, faculty and staff as well as friends and family. The event featured 12 different cuisines from India, China, Thailand, Israel, Korea, Vietnam, Indonesia, Japan, Europe, Cuba, Argentina and a fusion of Central Asia. Host students, representing different student clubs at UCLA Anderson from around the world, sourced authentic food from some of the best restaurants across Los Angeles. Some student hosts also dressed up in their country’s and/or region’s traditional attire and spent time conversing with attendees to explain the details of the food served such as special occasion when it is consumed and cooking ingredients and methods. While a collection of international beverages to pair with the food was provided by the AndersonEats and Southeast Asia Business Association, desserts from the European Business Association made the atmosphere a bit sweeter. Cultural diversity was also on display through international music and student hosts sharing facts and customs about their own countries.

The Critics’ Choice Award for the best tables was judged on the basis of providing the best cultural experience. The decision was a difficult one to make. The two winners selected by judges from the full-time MBA office, included the South Asian Business Association’s paneer and chicken tikka and the Greater China Business Association’s cold noodles. Further, the two People’s Choice awards for best hospitality and cuisine was awarded to the Jewish Business Students Association’s burekas and rugelach and the Korean Business Student Association’s fried chicken and spicy rice cake.

IBA is grateful to the Center for Global Management, the Office of Diversity, ASA and MA Student Affairs for supporting the event and ensuring that UCLA Anderson remains an open and inclusive environment that embraces, celebrates and values diversity. In addition to the IBA, participating student clubs included: South Asian Business Association, Japan America Business Association, Greater China Business Association, Korean Business Student Association, European Business Association, Southeast Asia Business Association, Jewish Business Student Association, Asian Management Business Association, Anderson Eats, Net Impact and AnderTech.

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Thursday, May 16, 2019 4:00-5:30pm, Bunche Hall, UCLA

“Patent Litigation Considerations for Chinese Companies” with Lisa Zang, Associate, Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, P.C.

While in recent years, Chinese companies have enjoyed immense success in the technology arena, there has been an uptick in U.S. patent litigations against Chinese companies. Given the amount of business that Chinese companies conduct in the U.S., the likelihood of collecting a significant U.S. judgment (or settlement payment) has also increased. In light of these developments, it is important for Chinese companies to take measures to reduce their exposure to U.S. patent lawsuits and the associated burdens of litigation. This includes reviewing business practices to avoid inadvertently infringing U.S. patents. In addition, Chinese companies can apply a discovery strategy early in litigation that limits discovery to only U.S.-based activities. In so doing, companies can set the stage for early motions for summary judgment to foreclose the recovery of damages for foreign sales. On Thursday, May 16, Lisa Zang, an associate in Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati's Los Angeles office addressed an audience of UCLA students and faculty to discuss these as well as other considerations that affect Chinese companies. Following her presentation, Yunxiang Yan, director of the UCLA Center for Chinese Studies and Professor of Anthropology moderated a conversation around the topic and key issues. Zhang’s practice focuses on intellectual property litigation. She has handled all phases of patent litigation and represented clients in the biotech, communications, electronics, mobile, pharmaceutical, security, and software industries in patent infringement and trade secret matters. The event was organized by the UCLA Center for Chinese Studies and co-sponsored by the Center for Global Management.

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Wednesday, May 15, 2019, 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Dean’s Conference Room

Lunch Series with CGM Advisory Board Member Brent Nelson Smith (’86), Co-Founder and Managing Partner, LevelOne Capital Limited; Former Global Group Head of Corporate & Investment Banking DBS Bank Ltd. On “Global Investment Banking and Entrepreneurship.”

On Wednesday, May 15, 2019, the Center for Global Management hosted a luncheon with advisory board member and UCLA Anderson alumnus, Brent Smith (’86). A senior international manager, financial services executive, private investor and strategic advisor, Smith has over thirty years of experience across Asia, the U.S. and Australia and now regularly commutes between the U.S. and Southeast Asia. Since 2008, he has served as co-founder and managing partner of LevelOne Capital Ltd., a pan-Asian investment and advisory firm where he has specialized in startup and mezzanine opportunities in emerging markets with a focus on southeast Asia, particularly Vietnam and Singapore. Smith formerly served as managing director and global group head of corporate and investment banking for DBS Bank, a Singaporean multinational bank and financial services company after spending almost 15 years with JPMorgan & Co., where he was a managing director in the investment banking and mergers and acquisitions groups, and completed assignments in New York, Melbourne, Sydney, Singapore and San Francisco. First, second and third year students from the full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs, including past and present CGM mentees, members of the Investment Finance Association, Entrepreneur Association and Southeast Asian Business Association and students interested in global management gathered to hear his career trajectory since graduating from UCLA Anderson in 1986. The luncheon provided an opportunity for interested MBA students to meet Smith in an informal and interactive setting and hear his thoughts, insights and experiences as a global investment banker, investor, entrepreneur and strategic advisor. He discussed his career trajectory since graduating from UCLA Anderson as well and his experience living, working and doing business internationally, and the importance of global and diverse perspectives, cultural sensitivity and fluency and international experiences in today’s environment. He shared many personal stories and experiences with the students as well as lessons learned throughout his successful global career, providing valuable guidance to students and describing his transition from investment banker to CFO to venture capitalist to entrepreneur. Smith discussed the importance of peer to peer networking, being open to opportunities and opening yourself up to your network. He explained how past experiences and skills acquired in the early days of his career have helped him understand different industries in different countries as well as comprehend various management structures which have all been valuable both in his entrepreneurial ventures today as well as in his role as a board director. He also touched on the importance of looking, listening, learning and self analyzing. The lunch was supported by the Investment Finance Association, the Entrepreneur Association and Southeast Asian Business Association.

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Thursday, May 9, 2019, 4:30 PM, Anderson Afternoon, North Terrace

Celebrating Israeli Independence Day at UCLA Anderson

The Jewish Business Student Association (JBSA), with support from the Center for Global Management and Anderson Student Council, organized an Israeli-themed Anderson Afternoon on Thursday, May 9 to celebrate Israel’s Independence Day. Independence Day commemorates the Israeli Declaration of Independence on May 14, 1948, making this year the 71st anniversary of the establishment of a Jewish state in the land of Israel. JBSA’s mission is to build and sustain a community that enhances the professional, social and educational experience of Jewish students at UCLA Anderson. Given the significant interest among UCLA Anderson students in learning more about Israel, as demonstrated by the participation in the annual Israel trek, the JBSA wanted to share more about Israel’s unique history and culture and make it accessible to the wider UCLA Anderson community. Students enjoyed Israeli food and music, while students who participated on the Israel trek shared their recent experiences in Israel with other students who were interested in learning more about the history of the country and the importance of Independence Day.

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Friday, May 3, 2019 8:30AM – 4:30PM

The Future of the Automobile Conference: Driving Towards Tomorrow, Petersen Automotive Museum

Long a center of car culture, Los Angeles is emerging as the epicenter of new transportation development. The world is watching closely to see how we redesign our urban landscape around new electric, autonomous and ridesharing technologies. California will play a key role in creating the hardware and the software and establishing the regulatory framework that will underlie a dramatic shift in the transportation industry extending across America and around the world. On Friday, May 3, the Los Angeles World Affairs Council and Petersen Automotive Museum hosted the second Future of the Automobile Conference – Driving Towards Tomorrow at the Petersen Automotive Museum in west Los Angeles to explore the impact of evolving design, rideshare, and technology in the automotive industry with the most forward-thinking automotive leaders and designers who shared their visions of the future. The conference brought together leading voices from car manufacturers, technology companies and regulatory agencies for a day-long series of talks and panel discussions on one of the biggest technological, economic and social changes facing the U.S. and the world in the coming years and provided a glimpse into the future of our mobility and explored the brave new world of the personal transportation revolution that is set to transform every city in the world. As a member of the LAWAC, the Center for Global Management supported 14 students from the full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs to attend the day-long conference which opened with a discussion around “Visions of Tomorrow.” In this inaugural session, respected thought leaders from the automotive and technology industries, academia, and public policy shared their perspectives on the myriad of challenges and opportunities for the future of the automobile. This was followed by a keynote address on “Designing the Future” with Klaus Bischoff, VW’s head of design who since 2007, has been responsible for global design for the Volkswagen brand. There were morning breakout sessions on topics such as self-driving cars and inter-vehicle communication, connectivity and security; the future of infrastructure and city planning; the future of ownership and ridesharing; and artificial intelligence and autonomy. The mid-day keynote was delivered by McKeel Hagerty, CEO of Hagerty around the topic of “Human driving in the autonomous future.” Hagerty’s knowledge and enthusiasm have given him a reputation as an authority within the automotive and automotive media worlds, representing the classic car community on numerous boards and advisory groups, Afternoon breakout sessions explored the powering of the future and modern advances in electric vehicles; human-computer interfaces, design, and the driving experience; the industry future and manufacturing transition; and rising China: Competition or cooperation in future automotive technology. The birth of the car was a product of innovation in a core set of advanced industrialized countries. More than a century later, a new revolution in automotive design is taking place against a setting of globalized industries and technologies. New market entrants, such as China, are seeking to be leaders in the new era of autonomous automobiles. This panel explored whether the question as to whether international competition will rule the day, or whether countries will learn to cooperate in the establishment of standards and the sharing of technologies?

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Monday, April 29, 2019 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM, Executive Dining Room, UCLA Anderson

World Today Discussion Series “U.S.-China Conflict and the Case of Huawei: Business, Policy and Legal Issues and Implications”

Huawei is the world's No. 1 telecommunications equipment maker, despite being effectively shut out of the U.S. market. The company has spent decades building a strong presence in markets around the world and last year, overtook Apple as the second biggest supplier of smartphones. The detention in Canada of Huawei’s CFO for extradition to the U.S. caused major concerns in international business, particularly among companies and executives in the telecoms and technology sectors. Huawei's rise as a global tech company is under threat as an increasing number of governments express concern that its technology could provide a back-door for the Chinese authorities. The assault on Huawei's business reflects the increasingly bitter rivalry between Beijing and Washington over who will control the technologies of the future. There is particular concern about the security of 5G because it will be used to carry vast amounts of data, connecting robots, autonomous vehicles and other sensitive devices. On Monday, April 29, the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management hosted a discussion over dinner with technology and legal experts who explored the business, policy and legal issues surrounding the Huawei case, and also provided lessons for future global leaders in the audience. The discussion was moderated by Christine Loh, a visiting professor at UCLA Anderson who teaches a course on non-market risks, a lawyer by training and also a former government minister in Hong Kong. Panelists included UCLA alumnus, Craig Ehrlich (B.A. ’78), chair of the Center for Global Management and former chairman of the GSMA — the world’s largest trade association for the mobile industry, whose business and investing career has focused on the mobile and technology sectors; and two experienced lawyers who have had to deal with some of the types of issues that the case raises: Gary Lincenberg, a principal at Bird, Marella, Boxer, Wolpert, Nessim, Drooks, Lincenberg & Rhow, P.C. and Jason Linder, a partner with Irell & Manella LLP. The discussion addressed the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, U.S. trade sanctions, cyber-based national security issues and how these have accelerated as well as how U.S. law might be used. The possible wider implications and scenarios that could evolve from these positions and how the cost and timing of 5G rollout might also be influenced were also addressed. The event engaged over 100 students and faculty from UCLA Anderson, UCLA School of Law and UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs in a fascinating discussion around this very complex case. The World Today Discussion Series engages students in dialogue in an interactive, engaging and enriching discussion format around current global issues that transcend borders. Through the series, the CGM engages globally minded students with issues that matter and ideas that stimulate. Through balanced discourse, the series serves as a neutral forum to educate students on global issues while at the same time encourage debate and examination. 

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Monday, April 22, 2019, 7.00-9.00pm Wolfgang Puck, UCLA Ackerman Union

UCLA Anderson Latin American Business Association (LABA) Organizes Mixer for LABA Students to Network with LABA Alumni, Living and Working in Los Angeles

On Monday, April 22, LABA leaders organized an evening of networking and camaraderie at the Wolfgang Puck restaurant located in the heart of the UCLA campus. The 2019 LABA Alumni Mixer, organized by LABA and sponsored by the Center for Global Management and Anderson Student Association, gathered together around 15 first and second year full-time MBA students and members of the UCLA Anderson Latin-American alumni community who live and work in the greater Los Angeles area. This is the second year that the CGM has supported LABA to promote this event that seeks foster a bond that goes beyond the two or three years that students spend at UCLA Anderson and promote lifelong connections and friendships to assist with networking, recruiting and increasing school engagement.

This year, alumni who work at companies such as Boeing, Mattel, Riot Games, Safra, Sony Pictures and 7 Bridges LATAM attended the mixer. The evening provided a terrific forum for students to learn more from alumni about the companies as employers, possible recruiting opportunities as well as life after the MBA. Professor Gonzalo Freixes, associate dean of the FEMBA and EMBA programs, originally from Cuba and a strong supporter of many LABA initiatives, attended and engaged in conversations with students and alumni. The event also provided an opportunity for alumni to familiarize themselves with both the CGM and LABA-led programming such as the Latin American Business Conference and various speaker series and panel discussions. It also reinforced the commitment of “Sharing Success” between alumni and the younger generations, promoting collaboration and potentially generating future partnerships and business opportunities too. We are delighted to see this event becoming an annual tradition for bringing together current and former LABA members!

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Friday, April 19, 2019, 11:30 AM - 7:30 PM, UCLA Anderson School of Management

2019 Wilbur K. Woo Greater China Business Conference: A Dialogue Across the Pacific

On Friday, April 19, 2019, the Center for Global Management hosted the 13 th annual  Wilbur K. Woo Greater China Business Conference at the UCLA Anderson School of Management. The 2019 Conference, titled, "A Dialogue Across the Pacific," brought together successful U.S. and Chinese leaders, investors and influencers from a variety of industries and sectors who shared their perspectives on the changing dynamics of U.S.-China relations and the implications and future of the U.S.-Sino relationship.

Speakers, including UCLA and UCLA Anderson alumni and faculty members addressed an audience of over 300 attendees from the UCLA as well as business, investment and governmental communities. Discussion focused on new and creative investment strategies and partnerships as well as the importance of collaboration that embraces cooperation, stimulates innovation, drives sustainable economic growth and facilitates cross-border growth and expansion. Speakers also provided an analysis of the current state and future outlook of the two largest economies in the world and addressed the importance of innovation, collaboration and new technology. 

Following a lunchtime career panel discussion for UCLA students with UCLA and UCLA Anderson alumni, the conference was officially opened by UCLA Anderson's Interim Dean and Faculty Director of the Price Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation. Alfred E. Osborne Jr.; Michael Woo, Los Angeles' first Asian-American city councilman, son of conference founder Wilbur K. Woo (B.A. '42) and dean of Cal Poly Pomona College of Environmental Design; and Pin Tai, CEO and president of Cathay Bancorp and Cathay Bank, a platinum sponsor of the 2019 conference. This was followed by the keynote address, delivered by Zak Dychtwald, founder and CEO of the Young China Group and a macro overview and business perspective delivered by William Yu, economist with the UCLA Anderson Forecast and Chan Fong, partner at PwC, also a platinum sponsor of the 2019 conference. 

Plenary and concurrent sessions throughout the afternoon focused on U.S.-China relations and the opportunities and implications for cross-border business and investment, Chinese millennials and the emerging middle class, and the implications and opportunities for business. A range of other topics also were addressed, including: technological innovation and the importance of collaboration in advanced technologies, scientific advancements and R&D; improving people's wellbeing and the opportunities in health care, elder care, housing, education and environmental protection; and investment financing, entrepreneurship and growth strategies resulting from cross-border investment. The evening before the conference, the Center for Global Management hosted a private dinner for the speakers, moderators, student conference directors and sponsors in the executive dining room. Following the conference, a networking event was held in the same room which provided wonderful opportunities for the audience and speakers to continue conversations.

The conference featured speakers from American Wonder Porcelain, Ampaire Inc., Applied StemCell Inc., Cathay Bank, Consulate General of P.R. China in Los Angeles, Elavare Global Advisors, Global Win Capital Corporation, Google, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, HowardSchultz.com, Hylink USA, Johnson & Johnson, Landsea Homes, Maschoff Brennan, PwC, RAND Corporation, RedBridge Capital LLC, The Blueshirt Group, University of California Office of the President, USC Gould School of Law, Young China Group and the UCLA Anderson School of Management.

"Amid today's international economic tensions, it is critically important to understand the implications and future of China-U.S. economic policy for anyone involved in cross-border transactions in the Pacific Rim," says Jerry Nickelsburg, UCLA Anderson adjunct professor of economics and UCLA Anderson Forecast director and senior economist, who served as the moderator for the panel on U.S.-China relations." The continuing dialogue of the Wilbur K. Woo Greater China Business Conference provides a valuable forum for deepening our understanding." Born in China in 1916, the late Wilbur K. Woo (B.A. '42) received his bachelor's degree in business administration from UCLA. Wilbur K. Woo, vice chairman emeritus of Cathay Bank and Cathay Bancorp, was known for his decades of leadership in the Chinese-American community. Together with his wife, Beth, they endowed the Wilbur K. Woo Greater China Business Conference at UCLA Anderson with the goal of promoting understanding of the economic ties between the Greater China region and United States. They established the conference to show gratitude for the training Wilbur received at his alma mater many years ago. 

The 2019 Wilbur K. Woo Greater China Business Conference was organized by the Center for Global Management at the UCLA Anderson School of Management, in association with UCLA Anderson's Greater China Business Association (GCBA) and UCLA's Chinese Students and Scholars Association (CSSA). It was sponsored by PwC and Cathay Bank at the platinum level. Landsea Homes and Cox Castle Nicholson were silver and bronze sponsors, respectively. The China General Chamber of Commerce - Los Angeles, Los Angeles World Affairs Council, UCLA Asia Pacific Center and UCLA Center for Chinese Studies were supporting organizations. 

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Monday, April 15 through Thursday, April 18, 2019

7th UCLA Annual Latin American, LatinX and Iberian Film Festival: Women's Voices

The UCLA Latin American and Iberian Film Festival was founded in 2012 and has been running annually ever since. The Festival has been very effective in promoting recent Latin American and Iberian cinema, not only among the academic world, but also in the Los Angeles community at large. Working with more than twenty departments, centers and organizations, the 2019 festival, organized by the UCLA Department of Spanish and Portuguese raised funds to organize a multi-day festival that ran from Monday, April 15 through Thursday, April 18.

The 7th Annual Latin American, Latinx, and Iberian Film Festival: Women's Voices celebrated women filmmakers and featured screenings of twelve films produced and/or directed by female directors from Brazil, Chile, Dominican Republic, Mexico, Spain, and the United States. This was the first year that films made in the U.S. by Latinx filmmakers were included as part of the festival, with the aim to acknowledge and share the traditions, history and language of the Luso-Hispanic community around the world. 

The screenings took place at various venues on the UCLA campus, from the James Bridges Theater to the presentation room at the Charles E. Young Research Library. All screenings were followed by a Q&A session with the film directors as well as professors from various departments on campus. The opening night at the James Bridge Theater included a screening of "Real Women Have Curves" (United States, 2002), followed by a Q&A with the film's director, Patricia Cardoso, moderated by graduate student Gabriela Barrios. The festival concluded with a screening of "As Boas Maneiras" (Brazil, 2017), directed by Juliana Rojas and Marco Dutra and was followed by a Q&A with Juliana Rojas, moderated by graduate student Michelle Medrado and visiting professor Eliane Robert Moraes.  All screenings were preceded by a reception, featuring food from Spain and Mexico. 

On Thursday, April 18, following the screening of Cielo de Agua, Professor Sebastian Edwards moderated a panel discussion with Chilean filmmakers, Eugenia Poseck and Margarita Poseck. The panel also included Professor Verónica Cortínez, professor in the UCLA Department of Spanish and Portuguese and director of the UCLA Center for Southern Cone Studies. The panel discussed the book Fértil provincia y señalada: Raúl Ruiz y el campo del cine chileno, edited by Professor Cortínez. During the discussion, the panelists also talked about Poseck´s feature film Heaven (Cielo de Agua, Chile, 2018) which was screened at the festival two nights before and the short film Tide (Marea, Chile, 2007) that was screened on Thursday, April 18.  

The 2019 Latin American, Latinx and Iberian Film Festival: Women's Voices was organized and presented by the UCLA Department of Spanish and Portuguese and sponsored by various units on campus, including the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management, Latin American Institute, Center for Southern Cone Studies, Department of Gender Studies and the LGBTQ Studies Program, among others. The screenings were free and open to the public.

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Wednesday, April 10, 2019, 12:15 PM – 1:30 PM, UCLA School of Law

"Law and Macroeconomics: Legal Remedies to Recessions" with Yair Listokin, Professor of Law, Yale Law School

In his new book, Law and Macroeconomics: Legal Remedies to Recessions, Yair Listokin, Shibley Family Fund Professor of Law at Yale Law School proposes that we take seriously law’s ability to function as a macroeconomic tool, capable of stimulating demand when needed and relieving demand when it threatens to overheat economies. He argues that law, of all things, has the potential to rescue us from the next economic crisis. Listokin makes his case by looking at both positive and cautionary examples, going back to the New Deal and including the Keystone Pipeline, the constitutionally fraught bond-buying program unveiled by the European Central Bank at the nadir of the Eurozone crisis, the ongoing Greek crisis, and the experience of U.S. price controls in the 1970s. History has taught us that law is an unwieldy instrument of macroeconomic policy, but Listokin argues that under certain conditions it offers a vital alternative to the monetary and fiscal policy tools that stretch the legitimacy of technocratic central banks near their breaking point while leaving the rest of us waiting and wallowing. During a lunchtime presentation on Wednesday, April 10, 2019 in front of a packed room of students and faculty from both the UCLA School of Law and Anderson School of Management, Listokin discussed his new book which was then followed by a moderated Q&A with UCLA Professor of Law, Jason Oh. Listokin has been honored with a Milton Friedman Fellowship from the Becker-Friedman Institute at the University of Chicago and has served as a Visiting Professor at Columbia Law School, Harvard Law School, and New York University School of Law. His research has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, Fortune, cnn.com, Boston Globe, and Slate. The event was organized by the Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy and sponsored by the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management.

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Tuesday, April 9, 2019, 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM, Korn Convocation Hall

Film Screening of “Better Angels,” A feature documentary film on the U.S.-China relationship, followed by Moderated Discussion with Film’s Producers

During the evening of Tuesday, April 9 and in advance of UCLA’s 2019 Wilbur K. Woo Greater China Business Conference, the Center for Global Management in collaboration with the Los Angeles World Affairs Council hosted a film screening of Better Angels, a feature documentary on the U.S.-China relationship. The screening attracted an audience of over 100 students, alumni and members of the Los Angeles community who gathered in Korn Convocation Hall to watch the screening Better Angels, which was produced over five years, shot on four continents, and created with the participation of three U.S. Secretaries of State. The documentary captures compelling stories that highlight the global stakes, challenges and opportunities of the world’s most important bilateral relationship. At a time when the world’s two acknowledged superpowers seem to be moving closer towards economic and political conflict, this feature documentary by two-time Academy Award®–winning director Malcolm Clarke explores how the destiny of both countries became so deeply and inextricably intertwined. By examining the day-to-day lives of ordinary Chinese and American citizens this feature-length documentary asks: Can the United States survive the rise of China? Is confrontation inevitable? Or, by rediscovering our Better Angels, can we find a way to grow beyond our mutual suspicions and misperceptions, to create a stable and prosperous alliance that could benefit the entire world? Following the screening, Professor Min Zhou, Walter and Shirley Wang Endowed Chair in U.S.-China Relations & Communications, and Director of the UCLA Asia Pacific Center moderated a conversation with William A. Mundell and David Dreier, the film’s producer and co-executive producer, respectively who were later flying to Beijing where Better Angels would serve as the opening documentary at the 2019 Beijing Film Festival. The event was organized by the Center for Global Management, in collaboration with the Los Angeles World Affairs Council. Screening sponsors included the UCLA’s Asia Pacific Center, Center for Chinese Studies and Burkle Center for International Relations as well as UCLA Anderson’s Greater China Business Association and UCLA’s Chinese Students and Scholars Association.

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Sunday, March 24 – Saturday, March 30, 2019

39 students visit Shenzhen and Hong Kong as part of the CGM’s global immersion course, “A Technology Driven Transformation of Society, Enterprises and Consumers,” led by Terry Kramer, adjunct professor and faculty director, Easton Technology Management Center

In March, over spring break, 39 students from UCLA Anderson’s full-time, fully employed, executive and UCLA-NUS executive MBA programs visited Shenzhen and Hong Kong for the in-country week of the CGM’s global immersion course, “A Technology Driven Transformation of Society, Enterprises and Consumers,” led by Terry Kramer, adjunct professor and faculty director of the Easton Technology Management Center. At UCLA Anderson, Professor Kramer also teaches the foundational technology management course that covers the impact of disruptive innovation on products, services, markets and competition, and another course on the evolution and innovation in the mobile communications industry and promising areas of innovation.

A notable transformation is occurring in Hong Kong and the surrounding region of Shenzhen. This technology driven transformation has been enabled by Government policy, changes in consumer preferences and enterprise driven innovation. During the course, students learned a great deal about and experienced firsthand the transformation in the region and for China and Hong Kong more broadly in areas such fintech, high-tech smart manufacturing and internet services, specifically drawing upon contextual leadership—identifying the “cause and effect” of the successes in the region and the likely future outcomes and areas of innovation.

During the week in-country, students heard from many prominent business and technology leaders, founders and CEOs, academics as well as successful entrepreneurs. They also met with and had the opportunity to hear from successful and influential UCLA and UCLA Anderson alumni and saw firsthand the power, influence and connections of the UCLA brand and network in China and Hong Kong. A number of fireside chats, panel discussions and several conversations helped illuminate the region’s political, economic, and innovation-oriented environment, and the significant changes that have occurred over the last several decades. Students visited companies and heard from executives across several sectors which demonstrated the transformation in the region and for China more broadly in areas such fintech, high-tech smart manufacturing, social media and internet services. Visits such as Tencent/WeChat, Foxconn, DJI, Mindray and Royole, as well as other emerging artificial intelligence and fintech companies were important in telling the story.

In Shenzhen, the inaugural speakers on the first day provided terrific context and foundation. First, students heard from Joe Rocha, managing director of Greenpro Capital Corporation, who also serves as the governor of the South China AmCham and has been a key member of the South China business community for over ten years. His presentation looked at the China of today and tomorrow and its transformation of society through new technologies. He provided an excellent overview of the Chinese economy and discussed the specific areas of technology based innovation that he felt have the greatest promise. He also addressed the opportunities for Chinese companies to expand globally and in turn for U.S. companies to expand into China. Derek Haoyang Li, a serial entrepreneur, founder and CEO of Yixue Squirrel AI Learning, who has been recognized as one of the “Top 30 AI-Entrepreneurs in China” then addressed the artificial intelligence solution in education and the unique challenges and opportunities that Chinese companies have in AI vs. other nations. Squirrel AI Learning is an edtech company that educates children through artificial intelligence and helps children to advance learning through a real-time adaptive system and cultivate good learning habits with practice.

The first visit of the week was to HAX Shenzhen, located in the well-known electronics market area of Shenzhen. HAX, which started in 2012 is the first and most prolific full-stack hardware accelerator, with over 270 companies launched in the past five years. The students also visited Mindray. Founded in 1991, Mindray has adopted advanced technologies and is today one of the leading global providers of medical devices. The company’s mission is “to advance medical technologies to make healthcare more accessible.” Mindray is dedicated to innovation in the fields of patient monitoring and life support, in-vitro diagnostics, and medical imaging. Students had an opportunity to hear from its CEO, Cheng Minghe about the unique Chinese context and the areas of innovation that the company is involved in. Students also visited Foxconn to learn about its autonomous vehicle initiative, smart farming and enterprise supply chain management platform. A visit to DJI (Da-Jiang Innovations Science and Technology), the world’s largest drone-maker provided an opportunity for students to learn more about its range of products including unmanned aerial vehicles, flying platforms, flight controllers for multi-rotors and ground stations. Students also vised Royole, a tech unicorn that was founded by Stanford engineering graduates in 2012 whose mission is to improve the way people interact with and perceive their world. The company creates and manufactures next-generation human-machine interface technologies and products including advanced flexible displays, flexible sensors, and smart devices – some of which the students had the opportunity to test out. In an entrepreneurial lab set up at Bee+ Technology’s impressive co-working space in Nanshan, students learned about the tech startup scene and heard from four different local tech entrepreneurs and their respective businesses ranging from virtual reality to manufacturing to the IoT and blockchain. The entrepreneurs they discussed the feasibility of their current projects and particular challenges they are facing. Student also heard from Kent Zaitlik, CEO and founder of MOZI.AI and learned about the application of AI in biomedicine and the AI-based play in healthcare.

A highlight of the week was the visit to Tencent’s headquarters and a tour of its Exhibition Hall. Here, students learned more about Tencent’s story, the company’s evolution and its remarkable innovations, including Tencent Games; WeChat; Tencent Pictures; e-Sports; its smart retail where you can pay by face recognition using the WeChat wallet; Tencent AI lab and its AI medical innovation too. Nan Wang, a director in Tencent’s strategy development department addressed the group. She touched on many areas, including how Tencent maximizes user engagement on its platforms and explained that maximizing user engagement remains the core of Internet competition. She talked about the Internet-led digital transformation that is being seen across all fields i.e. commerce, transportation, healthcare, food and beverage as well as finance and suggested that Internet companies are driving technological innovations. Tencent is transforming itself from a 2C (consumer) company to a 2B (business) company. She addressed Tencent’s strategy and also its strategic partnerships which enrich Tencent’s ecosystem and empowers partners in key verticals. This visit and discussion was a very memorable and invaluable part of the students in-country global immersion experience.

In Shenzhen, Edison Song (B.A. ’12), president of the UCLA South China Alumni Association arranged a UCLA alumni gathering at the rooftop bar of the Grand Hyatt Hotel. In addition to a number of UCLA Anderson students from the course, there were also a number of UCLA and UCLA Anderson alumni in attendance who either resided in Shenzhen, were passing through on business or who made the trip from Hong Kong. Everyone enjoyed a nice evening of networking.

After three days in Shenzhen, the group traveled to Hong Kong. The inaugural visit was to EMQ. Launched in 2014, EMQ offers cross-border remittance (money transfer) services between two countries at a fraction of the price of conventional banks. Max Liu, EMQ’s co-founder and CEO explained how fragmented Asia is with different regulations, different settlement systems and different currencies and explained how he wanted to build an alternative settlement network. He gave a very insightful presentation with an illumination of the market and market structure, competitive environment, and EMQ's positioning and most importantly, the impact of “digital.” We later heard from Professor KC Chan, former Secretary for Financial Services and the Treasury of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region and adjunct professor of finance at HKUST. Since July 2018, he has also served as a senior advisor for WeLab. Founded in 2013 in Hong Kong, WeLab is reinventing traditional financial services by creating seamless mobile lending experiences. He talked about the strategy, business model and related successes of WeLab as well as the disruption and innovations that have taken place in the financial markets. Professor Chan also provided his unique perspective on Hong Kong’s fintech ecosystem at the intersection of government and academia. Elinor Leung, managing director of the regional telecom and internet team at CLSA, one of Asia’s leading capital markets and investment groups shared extremely informative insights on Internet services, China and global trade related issues. She has been covering the Internet giants since they first listed. Her research covers areas such as e-payments, finance, entertainment and the cloud.

On the Thursday evening, UCLA Anderson alumni as well as recently admitted students gathered at the Mira Hotel in Tsim Sha Tsui on Nathan Road for an alumni panel discussion and networking reception. Around 16 guests attended. Professor Kramer moderated a conversation with UCLA Anderson alumni Fritz Demopoulos (’97), founder of Queen’s Road Capital; Long (Alex) Shang Ying (B.S. ’92; ‘01), managing partner of Rivendell Partners; and Leland Sun (’86), founder and managing director of Pan Asian Mortgage Company. Alumni talked about their career trajectory post-Anderson and shared their thoughts and insights on the technology driven transformation of society, enterprises and consumers from their personal as well as own industry perspective. They did an excellent job describing both the macro and micro investment environment in China which really helped students better understand both the opportunities and challenges of innovation in the region. Everyone then enjoyed an evening of networking in the hotel’s Vibes Garden. The panel discussion was very well received and the networking reception was a tremendous success. It was wonderful to see so many alumni and students networking together and the significant strength and influence of the UCLA Anderson network in Hong Kong.

During their time in Hong Kong, students traveled by metro and on foot to experience the city the way locals travel. On the last day, the group traveled by MTR to The Hub co-working space and were able to compare and contrast the co-working space in Hong Kong with what they had visited in Shenzhen. Daniel Puzny, founder of the International Blockchain Lab which works with new technologies, focused on blockchain, addressed blockchains in Asia, bitcoin and cryptocurrencies and explained that blockchain as a digital registry is designed to disrupt multiple verticals, including digital currency, health and real estate. The final speaker of the week, Renu Bhatia, co-founder of Asia Fintech Angels and an advisor to FintechHK, addressed the fintech ecosystem in Hong Kong. The breath of her comments covering China, Hong Kong, India and the U.S. were high impact and her focus on fintech innovation all contextualized with her leadership learnings and approaches were invaluable. Students learned a lot about the region, innovation and decision-making from her. This was a terrific session to conclude the week.

On the last day or the course, some students enjoyed a very pleasant afternoon getaway from the hustle and bustle of the city and traveled to the beautiful Lantau Island to visit the Giant Buddha and Po Lin Monastery. Others enjoyed emblematic views from the top of Victoria Peak, explored the luxurious residential area of Repulse Bay and also visited Aberdeen Fishing Village, a picturesque floating harbor with seafood markets and floating restaurants. During the week, students had many opportunities to enjoy some of China’s culinary delights, including the famous Peking duck at 1949, on the roof top of the famous Happy Coast Shopping mall in the Nanshan District and then at the end of the week, they enjoyed some local Cantonese cuisine at NanHai No. 1 on Nathan Road with a great view of the harbor and city. On the Saturday, some enjoyed Art Basel to explore Asia’s international art scene, others took in more sights of Hong Kong while other students departed home or headed to other parts of Asia. This first technology-focused global immersion course helped students to understand the dynamic growth of Shenzhen juxtaposed against the historic prosperity of Hong Kong. And in the process of understanding these two fascinating success stories, the course uncovered the "cause-and-effect" relationship of government policy and the changes in consumer preferences and technology in driving unique outcomes. Students thoroughly enjoyed their time and experience in Shenzhen and Hong Kong – they learned a great deal about and experienced firsthand the transformation in the region and for China and Hong Kong more broadly in areas such fintech, high-tech smart manufacturing and internet services; they were inspired; met good friends; and had a truly immersive experience together.

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Sunday, March 24 – Saturday, March 30, 2019

40 students travel to Bogota and Medellin, for the CGM’s global immersion course to learn about “The Transformation of Colombia and Its Economy,” with Gonzalo Freixes, associate dean of the FEMBA and EMBA programs

During the same week of winter break, 40 students from UCLA Anderson’s full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs traveled together to Bogota and Medellin for the in-country week of the CGM’s global immersion course, “The Transformation of Colombia and Its Economy: From Plomo to Plata,” led by Gonzalo Freixes, adjunct professor and associate dean of the fully employed and executive MBA programs. This was the second time that the CGM visited Colombia for one of its courses and the first time that Medellin was included in the itinerary.

A lot has changed in Colombia over the last few decades. After years of violence and political instability, the country has transformed itself into one of Latin America’s leading economies. The government has made substantial progress in tackling the country’s illegal drug trafficking and reaching a settlement with revolutionary elements that have impeded the country’s growth and stability. At the same time, Colombia has experienced economic growth and prosperity as it has embraced a free trade economy. While many problems remain and economic growth has been stagnant in the region, Colombia has transformed itself into something of a Latin American success story. Foreign investment into the country and the growth of key domestic industries has made Colombia one of the best places in Latin America to do business. The second global immersion course to focus on Colombia provided students with a general overview of the country and its economy, as well as key insights and a deeper understanding of how Colombia managed this transformation and what it has meant for doing business in the country. The in-country portion of the course looked at some of the major industries and sectors in Colombia and immersed students in Colombian business and social culture.

The inaugural sessions took place in Bogota on Saint Joseph’s Day, a public holiday in Colombia, also referred to as “Dia del Hombre.” The opening speakers provided excellent context and a helpful framework for the week. First, Colombian journalist, John Otis provided a terrific overview of the many historical and cultural challenges facing the country. This was then followed by a presentation and discussion with UCLA Anderson alumnus, Andres Giraldo (’09), a principal at The Boston Consulting Group, who was joined by Wenyi Cai, managing partner of Polymath Ventures. In addition to talking about his time as a student at UCLA Anderson, Giraldo focused his presentation on the retail sector and highlighted several of the larger companies that operate throughout all of Latin America. Cai talked about Polymath Ventures, a digital venture group focused on innovating in sectors that are currently experiencing technological disruption. Cai believes these new technological solutions will be significantly different in emerging market segments, e.g. mobility, employment and health and wellness. Later, two UCLA Anderson alumni brothers, Igal Jinich (’95) and Zeev Jinich (’90) talked about their company Ciplas SAS, a third-generation family-owned and operated plastics manufacturing business in Colombia. Ciplas is a leading company in the transformation and commercialization of products made with polypropylene. The company’s product portfolio includes sacks and bags, canvases and tents, ropes and mesh packaging for sectors such as agro-industrial, petrochemical, mining and textiles. The brothers discussed the challenges of doing business in Colombia, the legal and tax frameworks, the labor laws and also the business opportunities that the country presents. The brothers each spoke about what led them to UCLA Anderson and ultimately to the business that they both now manage. Students were honored to have the opportunity to meet such successful and influential alumni living and working in the country.

Students also had the opportunity to learn about the flower sector through a visit to Bicco Farms, located on the rural outskirts of Bogota which produces and exports award-winning fresh cut flowers. Here, students heard from the farm’s general manager Mauricio Bonivento, who addressed the production process and the business of flower growers in Colombia. Bonivento discussed the challenges around the seasonal nature of the industry and how national and international holidays often dictate the color of flowers most desired by retail customers. Students enjoyed a guided tour of the nursery and greenhouse where the flowers are grown, the factory where the flowers are harvested, and the cold storage/refrigeration locations where the flowers are ultimately processed and packaged for distribution.

In 2011 UNESCO declared the "Coffee Cultural Landscape" of Colombia, a World Heritage site so a visit to Colombia would not be complete without learning more about Colombia’s important coffee sector. FEDECAFE, the National Federation of Coffee Growers of Colombia was founded in 1927 as a business association that promotes production and exportation of Colombian coffee. It currently represents over 540,000 producers, most of whom are small family owned farms. Maricela Aguinaga Arcon, a research economist for the Coffee Growers Federation, addressed the implementation of the public policies in place to support Columbia’s coffee trade, and discussed the retail landscape associated with coffee both in Colombia and around the world. Arcon further discussed the Federation’s role in the coffee trade, including quality control, market positioning, purchase guarantees and its contributions to the infrastructure of the country through development and construction in previously rural portions of the country.

In Bogota, students also learned about the challenges and opportunities of the real estate industry in the country from Margarita Llorente, the general secretary of Amarilo, a leader in the promotion, management, sale and construction of housing projects. Santiago Alvarez, CEO of LatAm Airlines, the second largest air carrier in Colombia addressed the company’s strategy and also competition in the airline industry. Alvarez explained that the challenges of the industry necessitate the company to generate creative solutions to drive revenue and growth. Lastly, in Bogota, the group visited the National Police Department of Intelligence to hear more about the political and economic situation in Colombia and the progress that the country has made over the last three decades from Diego Fernando Vallejo Garcia, professor of the Universidad de los Andes. Two high-ranking members of the Colombian National Police, General Gustavo Alberto Moreno Maldonado and Brigadier General Ramiro Alberto Riveros Arevalo both discussed the role of the National police in the region, the security challenges they face while highlighting Colombia’s commitment to security to ensure that it remains a stable and safe place for economic development.

Students then traveled to Medellin. The position of Medellín as the second industrial city in Colombia has been a main factor in overcoming its crises of the 1980s and 1990s. In February 2013, the Urban Land Institute chose Medellín as the most innovative city in the world due to its recent advances in politics, education and social development. Medellín also won the Lee Kuan Yew World City Prize 2016 which recognizes and celebrates efforts in furthering innovation in urban solutions and sustainable urban development.

During the first day in Medellin, students visited Ruta N, a technology incubator that develops various programs and services to facilitate the economic development of the city towards businesses in science, technology and innovation, in an inclusive and sustainable way. The objective of RutaN is to create an ecosystem for social and innovative change designed around talent, financial capital, legal and technological infrastructure and proper networking. At Ruta N several technology entrepreneurs shared their stories and discussed their various companies and projects including Vitalbox, a medical records platform and Red_Medellin, a company with aims to both create cheap, ubiquitous access to broadband internet for underserved communities and to give formerly unbanked individuals a way to transact digitally.

At Bancolombia, Camilo Velasquez, the bank’s director of innovation explained some of the challenges of being a regional bank in a country which has significant variability in population centers and geographical challenges, requiring Bancolombia to be nimble and investor focused. Students also learned about the fintech revolution that is taking place globally. Bancolombia has also been recognized for its sustainability focus and Andres Perilla, a sustainability analyst spoke to some of the sustainable business practices that Bancolombia seeks to finance in an effort to cater to the millennial generation. He explained that Bancolombia focuses its investment strategy on companies that seek out sustainable practices through energy efficiency, use of renewable energy and cleaner production of existing energy sources.

In Medellin, students also visited Globant to hear how the company generates value and positively impacts its community. Globant is a leading IT and software development company that seeks to connect users with brands using digital and cognitive technologies and methodologies to enhance the customer experience.

The students also attended a presentation at Sura, one of Colombia’s largest healthcare providers. At Sura, students learned about the current state of the healthcare system in Colombia, including the differences between Colombia’s private versus public health insurance systems, and experienced some of the technological solutions that Sura is integrating into Colombia’s evolving healthcare system.

The final presentation of the week was delivered by UCLA Anderson alumnus Juan Chusan (B.S. ’88, ’96), president of Retail Food at Nutresa, a leading food-processing conglomerate headquartered in Medellín. Nutresa’s principal activities are producing, distributing, and selling cold cuts, biscuits, chocolates, coffee, ice cream and pasta. In addition to sharing his own personal and inspiring story where he described coming from South America to UCLA Anderson, Chusan also described Nutresa’s business philosophy of treating each of its brands as a business unit, allowing each to serve as a natural hedge against the others. Chusan shared some valuable lessons related to the expansion of a multinational company into new markets including considerations of not just the size of a market, but also the logistics associated with managing a company in a foreign country.

After learning about the coffee sector earlier in the week from FEDECAFE, a visit to Colombia would not be complete without a visit to an actual coffee farm. At Capilla del Rosario, overlooking the Medellin Valley, the group received a tour of the coffee plantation and learned about the process of how coffee beans are grown, harvested, peeled, fermented, dried, and ultimately packaged and sold. In addition to learning about the chemistry and science behind the brewing of coffee, the students were treated to a Columbian coffee tasting as well.

To conclude the week, the group witnessed firsthand the transformation and innovation of the city with a tour of Comuna 13. This neighborhood has among the most tumultuous histories in the city and was once labeled the most dangerous neighborhood in the world. In the 1980s-’90s, the neighborhood was controlled by groups loyal to Pablo Escobar, the notorious drug lord who lived in Medellín. Students learned how the community has reinvented itself into a place of optimism becoming a livable, vibrant, and growing community. The focal point of the tour to Comuna 13 was the area around the outdoor escalators that provides access to homes in marginalized barrios that were formerly isolated from the city. Today, this transformed neighborhood is home to a colorful celebration of arts and culture, featuring street art and performances in several different parts of the neighborhood. Art saved the city as a vehicle for creative and political expression. The walls became a canvas to tell its history, beautifying the area and bringing optimism and peace to the residents, children, and visitors. Experiencing the life and color to the people in this community and seeing their potential for the future was an inspiring way to conclude the in-country week.

During the week, students also experienced local culture, visited key sites of important historical significance and enjoyed local cuisine and nightlife. In Bogota, they enjoyed a city tour and visited sites such as the historic square of Chorro de Quevedo, and the Botero Museum, which houses one of Latin America's most important international art collections. In Bogota, they also visited the Anthony Bourdain-featured restaurant, Tabula with great tapas, as well as Abasto, a nice, cozy and casual Latin bistro. The students enjoyed the opening dinner at the casual popular eatery Andres DC in Bogota. They were joined by UCLA Anderson alumni brothers Igal Jinich (’95) and Zeev Jinich (’90). In Medellin, the farewell dinner took place at Carmen Medellin, an enchanting space with a cozy yet hip vibe situated inside a house in the Poblado neighborhood. Here students enjoyed contemporary cuisine, inspired by Colombian ingredients and flavors that are creatively woven into modern dishes that express the country’s biodiversity. The dinner served as a wonderful end to a very productive and meaningful cultural experience. After the conclusion of the week, some students headed to explore the historic port city of Cartagena on Colombia’s Caribbean coast, while others traveled back home to the United States to start back at school or work.

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Sunday, March 24 – Saturday, March 30, 2019

40 students travel to Tokyo, for the CGM’s global immersion course to understand more about “The Business Environment and Opportunities in Japan,” with Mariko Sakakibara, professor of strategy

During the same week of spring break, 40 students from UCLA Anderson’s full-time, fully employed, executive and UCLA-NUS executive MBA programs traveled together to Tokyo for the in-country week of the CGM’s global immersion course, “The Business Environment and Opportunities in Japan,” led by Mariko Sakakibara, professor of strategy. This was the fourth time that a global immersion course had visited Japan and the third time that Professor Sakakibara had led the course.

After achieving spectacular economic growth from the 1950s to the 1980s, Japan has struggled with a prolonged recession in recent years. Its competitive position has been threatened by its Asian competitors. Japan’s aging population threatens its future growth. However, Japan remains the third largest economy in the world, and maintains its strong technological and cultural base. Japan-originated innovation has been commercialized and sold around the world, new businesses have been created and many business opportunities remain untapped. This course familiarized students with Japan’s business environment and helped students to identify business opportunities. Students gained a better understanding of the effects of Japanese systems on the way business is conducted in Japan and also explored business opportunities for both foreign and domestic companies and how to take advantage of these opportunities.

In Tokyo, the inaugural session was delivered by Terrie Lloyd, CEO of both Japan Travel, a leading resource for Japan travel information and Metroworks, a software technology company. He provided an overview of the business landscape in Japan and discussed the opportunities for U.S. companies. Lloyd also shared some insights into doing business in the country as a foreigner and addressed the Japanese mindset and cultural nuances that are important to understand. Dave Versteeg, CFO of Starbucks Japan then explained the history of Starbucks Japan, which was established in October 1995 as a joint venture between Sazaby League and Starbucks Coffee International. His presentation focused on how to become successful in the Japanese market. He compared and contrasted Japan’s business environment with that of the United States and explained how Japanese consumers are different to American consumers and that they are very influenced by the new and different, which is why Starbucks Japan has to create a new menu item every few weeks. Japanese consumers also typically stay in the coffee shop to drink coffee and are less inclined to grab and go therefore the location and space itself is highly valued by the consumer. Versteeg explained how Starbucks has to adapt to the Japanese consumer and implement different techniques in order to be a strong player in Japan’s coffee market.

The first company visit of the week was to the headquarters of Amazon Japan where the group was greeted by UCLA Anderson alumnus Shea Simpson (’11), head of licensing and label relations for Amazon Music Japan. Students heard from different Amazon businesses and learned how U.S. multinationals adapt to the Japanese consumer. Dan Callies, director of devices for Amazon Japan and Misako Furuya, head of Echo for Amazon Japan talked about the struggles of Echo in Japan and the challenges they currently face. Simpson provided an overview of the music industry in Japan and the struggles of getting Japan on board with streaming music. Mizue Arakawa, director of Amazon Fresh/Prime Now, Japan addressed the company’s experience with launching Fresh and Prime Now in Japan and explained some of the nuances and unique characteristics of the Japanese market as well as the needs and expectations of the Japanese consumer. During a visit to Terumo, founded in 1921 and the first company to produce medical thermometers in Japan, students learned about the healthcare industry in the country and in particular, the challenges and opportunities of Japan’s aging population. Since Terumo’s humble beginnings, the company has expanded into a medical device manufacturing giant, producing medical disposables, cardiovascular systems and diabetes care products.

Students also had the opportunity to visit, Fabbit, a co-working space and through an interactive panel discussion with local and expat entrepreneurs, were able to better understand Japan’s start-up scene, new government initiatives and funding opportunities as well as fundraising challenges. Panelists included Jordan Fisher, CEO and co-founder of Zehitomo, an Internet platform that connects customers and local services in Japan; Akira Kurabayashi, managing director, Draper Nexus Venture Partners, an early stage venture capital firm based in Silicon Valley and Tokyo that invests in B2B startups; Shirabe Ogino, CEO, Zaisan.net, a user-friendly service that makes it easier for the general public to understand financial markets and make the right investment and asset management decisions; and Yuki Kishi, fintech director at Plug and Play, a global innovation platform that has built accelerator programs, corporate innovation services, and in-house VC to expedite the progress of technological advancement.

At Nissan, students enjoyed a tour of its Oppama plant, one of the country’s largest plants where gasoline and electric-powered vehicles are built, to understand and see firsthand Japan’s cutting-edge manufacturing in action and the latest in car technology. The Oppama plant became the first in Japan to use robots on the production line when it introduced welding robots in 1970. The second part of the visit included a visit to Nissan’s Yokohama headquarters to learn about the company’s corporate strategy, new customer trends as well as challenges ahead for the car industry. They also heard from Yuta Yamazaki, manager, global brand strategy about the companies’ global sales strategy, Nissan Intelligent Mobility, electric vehicle and autonomous driving innovations and visited Nissan’s showroom to see its latest products. A visit to Costco Japan, the membership warehouse club was fascinating for the group. Costco opened its first Japan location in 1999 and since then has grown its presence to 26 stores across the country. The Japanese arm of the business is a wholly owned subsidiary of Costco U.S. Howard Tulk, vice president and director of operations, provided a brief introduction of Costco as well as the history and story of entering the Japanese market. Students learned that while Costco Japan stocks several U.S. brands and Costco private-label products, there are some big differences between the shopping experience in both countries. Because Costco is so unique, Japanese customers look at Costco more like a family trip. Costco Japan also sells some unique items for the Japanese consumer such as fresh sushi platters, different flavored kitkat bars, and Japanese whiskey and beer. The group had the opportunity to explore the Costco warehouse store and make some purchases using their Costco card.

Students were thrilled to have the opportunity to visit DeNA. Established in Tokyo in 1999 as a small start-up with the launch of an online auction service, DeNA has continuously expanded its business portfolio. Today, the company develops and operates a broad range of mobile and online services including games, e-commerce and entertainment content distribution and is a provider of mobile portal and e-commerce websites in Japan. It also owns the Mobage platform, one of the most popular cell phone platforms in Japan. After receiving a brief introduction on the company and hearing about the story and evolution of DeNA, students had the opportunity to hear from the company’s founder, Tomoko Namba who shared her own personal career journey and discussed entrepreneurship in Japan, venture capital in the country and explained some of the challenges to the entrepreneurial mindset in Japan.

During the final visit of the week to NEC, a Japanese multinational provider of IT services and products, students learned about the company’s business strategy and technology development for both domestic and global markets. Founded in 1899, NEC was the first Japanese company to form a joint venture with a foreign company (Western Electric) producing telephones and switches. Currently, NEC is the biggest PC vendor in the country and an important player in the global semiconductor market. Students also learned that NEC is the global leader in the field of biometric authentication and experienced the NEC Future Creation Hub which showcases technologies that the company has developed but are not yet available to the public. Here, business designers, data scientists, technology evangelists and other innovators team up with NEC’s global clients to jointly develop programs that generate social value for the next generation.

To conclude the week, UCLA Anderson alumnus David Nichols ('92), deputy president, representative director and chief administrative officer of State Street Trust & Banking Co. Ltd. discussed the business environment and opportunities in Japan from an investor’s viewpoint. He also talked about his own experience doing business in Japan and shared some key learnings including assimilation into the Japanese culture and negotiating techniques. In the late afternoon, alumni gathered together in Roppongi for an alumni panel discussion, which was later followed by a networking reception. Recently admitted students were also invited to join. Around 20 guests attended. Professor Sakakibara moderated a conversation with UCLA and UCLA alumni who shared their views on the business environment in Japan from their own personal experiences. Panelists included Vic Murai (’62), special advisor, Ichiryu Associates and former chairman, Compaq; Tomohiro Tohyama (LLM '84), co-founding partner of TMI Associates and president of the UCLA Japan Alumni Association; Ken Shibusawa ('87), president and CEO at Commons Asset Management, Inc.; and Riki Kojima (’92), chief of staff, Group CCO at Mitsubishi International Corporation and chairman of the UCLA Anderson Alumni Network Japan. Students also learned about the UCLA Japan Center in Tokyo and how the Japanese UCLA Alumni Association has helped contribute to its establishment. Panelists also addressed the many questions from students on the business climate in the country from what they had seen and experienced during their time in Japan. Topics centered around the hierarchal structure, women in the workforce as well as how Japanese companies are attracting talent. The panel discussion was very well received and the networking reception that followed at the Cedar Chop House and Bar in Roppongi was a terrific success. It was wonderful to see so many alumni and students networking together and the significant strength and influence of the UCLA /Anderson brand and network in Japan.

Students thoroughly enjoyed their time and experience in Japan. The cherry blossoms were in full bloom and the city was beautiful. In addition to the business visits and discussions, students also enjoyed the sites of Tokyo to better understand its culture and history. They visited the ancient Buddhist Asakusa Kannon Temple, Tokyo’s oldest temple and one of its most significant. After exploring the busy Asakusa, they relaxed on a boat down the Sumida River to the beautiful Hamarikyu Gardens where they could explore the gardens and enjoy refreshments at a traditional teahouse. During the week, students also enjoyed local traditional culinary delights. At Shabuzen restaurant, they tasted Japan’s iconic sake and the famous shabu-shabu. Some also enjoyed a foodie tour to experience the sights, sounds and most importantly the tastes of Tokyo that most visitors to not get to experience and explored the districts of Yurakucho, Ginza and Shimbashi. Early one morning, some students visited the fish market and enjoyed fresh slices of sashimi for breakfast. The group also visited Kamakura, a seaside city just south of Tokyo. The political center of medieval Japan, modern-day Kamakura is a prominent resort town with dozens of Buddhist Zen temples and Shinto shrines. Students also successfully navigated the Tokyo Metro, the city’s rapid transit system too.

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Tuesday, March 12, 2019, 5:00 - 7:00 PM, A-202, Collins Center, UCLA Anderson

The Sustainable State: The Future of Government, Economy and Society - A Book Talk with Chandran Nair

Chandran Nair is the author of The Sustainable State: The Future of Government, Economy and Society and founder and CEO of the Global Institute for Tomorrow, an independent Pan-Asian think tank. On Tuesday, March 12, 2019 UCLA welcomed Nair to campus for an afternoon discussion on his provocative book which argues that the West's market-driven model is not scalable and that development must be directed by a state that is willing and able to intervene in the economy. Corporations need to be directed towards meeting societal needs or otherwise restrained, not unleashed. For Nair, the path towards a sustainable future, especially in the large developing nations of the world, in which everyone's basic needs-and thus rights-are met is achievable only if the institutions of the state are strong and not prone to capture by vested interested. Following his presentation, Min Zhou, director of the UCLA Asia Pacific Center, professor of sociology and Asian American studies, and Walter & Shirley Wang Chair in U.S.-China Relations and Communications moderated a discussion with Nair, a regular speaker at global forums, including the World Economic Forum. The event was co-organized by the Asia Society Southern California and UCLA Asia Pacific Center and sponsored by the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management.

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Friday, March 1, 2019 1:00 - 6:00 PM, Korn Convocation Hall

2019 Latin American Business Conference: A ROAD MAP FOR LATIN AMERICA'S FUTURE

On Friday, March 1, prominent and influential leaders from both the private and public sectors, including UCLA Anderson alumni, gathered together in front of an audience of around 300 students, alumni, academics and members of the local business community in Korn Convocation Hall to address the opportunities and concerns of the region. In addition to sharing their experiences, insights and forecasts on the economic, political and social prospects for the region, they discussed the business and investment opportunities for Latin America and the region's important and influential role in the global economy. The conference was centered on actions necessary to develop and benefit from the opportunities that will allow the region to flourish and become a relevant and influential player on the world's stage.

Opening remarks were provided by Jose Gomez, a candidate of the full-time MBA Class of 2019 and co-president of the Latin American Business Association andAlfred E. Osborne, Jr., interim dean, professor and faculty director of UCLA Anderson Price Center for Entrepreneurship & Innovation. These were followed by a macro-economic overview of the region by Professor Sebastian Edwards, Henry Ford II Chair in international Management and faculty director of the Center for Global Management, an organizer and the lead sponsor of the conference. The keynote address was delivered by Sergio Fajardo, former Mayor of Medellín and former Governor of the State of Antioquia, Colombia which was followed by a moderated conversation with Sebastian Edwards. The conference focused on efforts underway to encourage new developments and advancements as Latin America prepares for a brighter future. Discussions examined the region's economic, trade, political and social prospects, with panels discussing the ways that the region must leverage its position in the world to foster sustainable growth and become a welcoming place for trade and investment, as well as an environment that encourages good governance and workforce development and education. 

Panelists included: Philip Behn, Senior Vice President of e-Commerce, Walmart de México y Centroamérica; Carlos Bremer,  chairman and CEO of Value Grupo Financiero; João Campos,  CEO pf  PepsiCo Foods Brazil; Agustín Caso Raphael, Mexico's deputy general auditor and professor of economics at ITAM; Eduardo Elejalde, founding partner of Latin America Enterprise Fund Managers (LAEFM) LLC and president of LAEFM Colombia Ltda.; Gerardo Grajales, chief transformation officer and executive vice president of Avianca Holdings S.A.; Juan M. Procaccini ('01), managing partner and former CEO of Argentina Investment and Trade Promotion Agency; Joana Monteiro, research coordinator in Rio de Janerio's  Prosecutor's Office and  former head of Rio de Janerio's Institute of Public Security;  Kevin Terraciano,  professor of History and director of UCLA Latin American Institute.

Discussions were moderated by: Sebastian Edwards; Gonzalo Freixes, adjunct professor of Accounting, Business Law, Taxation and International Business and associate dean of UCLA Anderson's Fully Employed and Executive MBA Programs; Felipe Cusnir ('13), CEO of Swell Capital Inc. and former director of International Trade & Investment with the Los Angeles Mayor's office; and Alfred E. Osborne, Jr. Before the conference, Sebastian Edwards and the Center for Global Management hosted a private luncheon for the speakers, moderators and student conference directors in the Dean's Conference Room. Following the conference, a networking event was held which provided wonderful opportunities for the audience and speakers to continue conversations. 

The event was organized by UCLA Anderson's Center for Global Management, UCLA Anderson's Latin American Business Association and UCLA's Latino Business Student Association, in collaboration with the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce. Conference sponsors included City National Bank (bronze level) and the UCLA Latin American Institute. 

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Tuesday, February 26, 2019, 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM, UCLA Faculty Center

Global Business and Policy Forum "Artificial Intelligence: Key Opportunities and Challenges"

Artificial intelligence will have a transformative societal impact in the coming years. While there is plenty that AI cannot do, it is perhaps the only technology in recent memory that, despite all the hype, will actually turn out to have been underhyped once its impacts are fully appreciated.  On Tuesday, February 26, the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management and  UCLA School of Law's Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy hosted  John Villasenor, UCLA professor of public policy and management and member of the World Economic Forum's Global Agenda Council on Cybersecurity for a very engaging discussion on what AI actually is, why it has become such a focus of attention and investment, and the resulting opportunities and challenges in relation to ethics, geopolitics, the labor market, combating bias, and regulation. During his presentation, Villasenor also addressed the intersection of technology, policy, law and business and broader impacts of key technology trends.  Villasenor is a professor of electrical engineering, public policy, and management, and a visiting professor of law. He is also a nonresident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and a visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford. His work considers the broader impacts of key technology trends, including advances in digital communications, the increasing complexity of today's networks and systems, and the growth of AI. Over dinner, there were many interactive table conversations where specific questions were discussed among the students, including whether it is acceptable to use AI-based systems to make sentencing or parole recommendations? Relatedly, whether people impacted by those decisions have the right to know the details of the underlying algorithms? Students were also asked to comment on the best way to maximize the likelihood that, when faced with decisions with ethical implications, AI systems will make the "right" choice? While some people believe that new AI regulation is necessary. Others argue that new AI regulation would have few benefits and would also stifle innovation. Students were asked to discuss their thoughts on his too.  The discussion engaged around 70 students and faculty from the UCLA Anderson School of Management and the UCLA School of Law. The Global Business and Policy Forum is a collaborative partnership between UCLA Anderson's Center for Global Management and the UCLA School of Law's Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy.

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Thursday, February 21, 2019, 12:00 PM, California Club, Los Angeles

Reducing Civilian Casualties in War Roundtable Discussion with Randall Bagwell, Director of International Humanitarian Law, American Red Cross

Some reports indicate that in recent conflicts 90% of the casualties have been civilians. During a Los Angeles World Affairs Council lunchtime roundtable discussion at the California Club on Thursday, February 26, Randall Bagwell, director of international humanitarian law at the Red Cross discussed the place of international humanitarian law (IHL) within the context of conflict and war, and how IHL leaders are trying to reduce civilian casualties. He addressed the work being done to provide greater safety to protected classes, including children, journalists, and asylum seekers and also discussed how IHL is responding to new warfare such as cyber attacks, armed drones, and robots.  Bagwell spoke about the rising numbers of civilians being harmed in current conflicts due to the non-international nature of many conflicts, such as the conflict between the U.S. and IS. Fighters are also not distinguishing themselves from civilians and remain in populated villages, endangering everyone around them. Most nations haven't ratified additional protocols surrounding these types of conflict, which "makes it increasingly difficult to determine which laws apply to these conflicts and leaves room for governments to take advantage of the gaps." Colonel (Retired) Randall Bagwell joined the American Red Cross after more than thirty years of service as a Judge Advocate General (JAG) Officer in the U.S. Army. As a legal advisor for the Army, Bagwell performed duties ranging from prosecuting and defending criminal cases to advising on administrative and regulatory matters. However, his specialty, and the majority of his assignments, were in International Humanitarian Law (IHL). He has also instructed on IHL with partner nations in over 20 countries. As a member of the LAWAC, the Center for Global Management supports attendance of UCLA Anderson students to LAWAC discussions and events.

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Monday, February 11, 2019, 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM

Global Management Lecture Series "The Globotics Upheaval: Globalization, Robotics and the Future of Work" with Richard Baldwin, Professor of International Economics, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva

On Monday, February 11, Richard Baldwin, Professor of International Economics, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva and editor-in-chief, VoxEU.org, joined the Center for Global Management and Professor Sebastian Edwards, Henry Ford II Chair in International Management for a conversation and moderated discussion on his new book, which Lawrence Summers, former U.S. Treasury Secretary described as "the best book yet on the new economic era we are entering. Any worker, company or government who doesn't want to be left behind should read and consider his arguments." In his book, The Globotics Upheaval, published in February 2019, Richard Baldwin, one of the world's leading thinkers on globalization, argues that "globots" will build a better future, but will create explosive social challenges along the way. Baldwin address a packed classroom of UCLA Anderson MBA, Ph.D. students and faculty and talked about how digital technology is allowing "white-collar robots" to displace many service-sector workers and professionals while at the same time enabling "telemigration" where talented, low-cost workers sitting abroad displace domestic office workers. If displaced office workers join with already displaced factory workers, the result could be a destabilizing upheaval. To avoid this, Baldwin asserts that governments must use the tools they have to slow the pace and make the competition from globots seem fairer.  In his presentation, he concluded that "globotics" is coming faster than most think, in ways that few expect and that it will create a better world of work if the transition is managed. He suggested that mismatched speed is the main problem. Richard Baldwin is Professor of International Economics at the Graduate Institute, Geneva, founder and editor-in-chief of the policy portal VoxEU.org, and associate member of Nuffield College, University of Oxford. In addition to his research and teaching, he advises governments and international organizations around the world on globalization and trade policy issues. In 1990-91, he served as a senior staff economist for President George Bush's Council of Economic Advisors. The event was co-sponsored by the UCLA Burkle Center for International Relations

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Saturday, February 9, 2019, 8:30 AM - 1:30 PM, Geffen Hall, David Geffen School of Medicine

The 23rd Annual Health Care Symposium Immigration and Healthcare: Status, Access and Bridging the Disparity

With over 12 million individuals nationwide and nearly 2.4 million within California, the undocumented immigrant population is an undeniable segment of our nation's makeup. Still, an undocumented immigrant's access to healthcare systems is limited and often nonexistent, leading to poorer outcomes and diminished population health. With a shifting political climate, society must begin to reckon with the impact of legislation on the health and outcomes of its most vulnerable populations. On Saturday, February 9, 2019, the 23rd Annual Health Care Symposium Immigration and Healthcare: Status, Access and Bridging the Disparity explored the relationship between immigration and the healthcare system, and addressed how the healthcare system can use social justice as a means to improve access to healthcare for immigrants in the United States. The Symposium that brought together around 100 students, physicians, administrators, public health leaders, and members of the local community in Geffen Hall at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, helped to increase awareness about immigration as a public health issue and encourage discussion on the importance of working together to end barriers to health care access and towards finding solutions to the health care disparities. The annual Symposium has served for two decades as an educational and invaluable forum to core medical school curriculum and highlighted crucial yet diverse topics of great importance in modern health care.

This year's Symposium presented different perspectives on immigration ranging from legal to public policy to local community efforts. The opening plenary session, "Immigration Law and Policy in the Trump Administration: Immigrants at Risk?" was delivered by Hiroshi Motomura JD, Susan Westerberg Prager Distinguished Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law, an influential scholar and teacher of immigration and citizenship. The closing keynote, "Immigration, Health, and Social Justice" was delivered by Richard L. Seidman MD, MPH, Chief Medical Officer, L.A Care Health Plan who is responsible for developing and implementing strategies and initiatives to ensure quality health care delivery to the more than two million members - some of the most vulnerable in the county. Breakout sessions focused on "Fighting Persecution: The Role of the Physician in Immigration and Asylum" and "Linking State Policies to Immigrant Health." 

The Health Care Symposium is an annual conference organized by students at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA for their fellow students, the broader UCLA community, and the general public, with the intent of exploring a topic of importance to modern healthcare. The Symposium is an expression of interest and excitement on the part of medical students who believe that students of all levels can be valuable contributors to the conversations that are reshaping our healthcare system and, consequently, our health. The purpose of the Symposium is to involve UCLA students in these conversations, giving them the opportunity to learn from and interact with national leaders in healthcare and related fields. The UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management was a sponsor of the Symposium, together with various cross-campus units including UCLA Health, the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, the Fielding School of Public Health and the UCLA International Institute, among others.

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Thursday, February 7, 2019, Anderson Afternoon, North Terrace

Celebrating Lunar New Year at UCLA Anderson

To celebrate the Year of the Pig, promote familiarity with and understanding of the Asian culture, and to strengthen cross club collaboration, on Thursday, February 7, 2019, the Center for Global Management supported the Greater China Business Association (GCBA), Asian Management Student Association (AMSA) and Korean Business Student Association (KBSA) to celebrate the Lunar New Year. The Lunar New Year is one of the most important holidays in Greater China, Korea, and Southeast Asia. During Anderson Afternoon on the North Terrace, the three clubs took this opportunity to bring the UCLA Anderson community together to celebrate and promote cultural diversity at UCLA Anderson. More than 400 UCLA Anderson students, faculty and staff participated in the festivities. The North Terrace was transformed into a sea of red with Lunar New Year décor and authentic food from Greater China and Korea was served. To help the UCLA Anderson community better understand the traditions, the three clubs prepared a variety of celebratory games and activities, including learning Chinese calligraphy, reading Chinese puzzle, winning red envelope and playing mahjong, Korean Yut and Jegi games. The event was hosted by GCBA, AMSA, and KBSA, and supported by the CGM, Anderson Student Association and the Office of Diversity Initiatives and Community Relations.

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Tuesday, February 5, 2019, Ackerman Union

Center for Global Management Mentor Program Gathering with Past and Present Mentees at Wolfgang Puck

On Tuesday, February 5, 2019, 2017-18 mentees shared experiences and networked with 2018-19 mentees at a dinner gathering at the Wolfgang Puck restaurant, Ackerman Union located in the heart of the UCLA campus. The CGM mentor program connects current full-time MBA, FEMBA, EMBA and UCLA-NUS EMBA students with members of the center's advisory board, a dedicated and actively engaged group of visionary global leaders spanning a variety of geographies and industries. The program provides students with a unique opportunity to connect and form meaningful relationships with board members, who offer valuable counsel and guidance on professional endeavors, living and working abroad, global business and life lessons. By playing a direct role in shaping the next generation of global leaders, board members contribute in the most meaningful ways. Mentees gain valuable guidance in academic and career direction, obtain advice and perspective, gain insights into industries and professions of interest, and learn about professional and personal development skills required to succeed. The program was established to augment knowledge and understanding among students interested in pursuing a career in international business and management across a variety of industries and disciplines, as well as living and working abroad upon graduation. During the 2018-19 academic year, four full-time MBA, three FEMBA and one UCLA-NUS EMBA students are participating as mentees in the sixth year of the program.

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Friday, February 1, 2019 11:30 AM-1:00 PM, C-315, Entrepreneurs Hall, UCLA Anderson

China and Beyond – A Front Row Seat: Perspectives of an American Academic in Beijing” with Michael Powers, Zurich Insurance Group Professor of Finance at Tsinghua University’s School of Economics and Management

On Friday, February 1, 2019, UCLA welcomed to campus Michael Powers, the Zurich Insurance Group Professor of Finance at Tsinghua University’s School of Economics and Management. He discussed his experience as a guest business and economics commentator for China Radio International and shared his thoughts on the current "trade war." Powers also offered some broader perspectives on China's emergence as a world power, and the U.S. reaction as well as addressed both the country’s domestic as well as international priorities from an economic, political and security standpoint. Following his presentation, Min Zhou, director of the UCLA Asia Pacific Center and Walter and Shirley Wang Endowed Chair in U.S.-China Relations and Communications moderated a conversation. Powers also holds a joint appointment as Professor of Economics and Business at Tsinghua’s Schwarzman College. From 2012 to 2015, he served as chair of Tsinghua’s finance department – a unique assignment for a foreign academic in China. Powers is co-editor of The Political Economy of Chinese Finance (2016), and provides regular business and economics commentary for China Radio International’s Today and BizToday programs. The event was part of the UCLA Asia Pacific Center’s China and Beyond Forum that aims to highlight and understand emerging issues in the Asia Pacific region. The event was sponsored by the UCLA Asia Pacific Center, Center for Chinese Studies, the Center for Global Management and the Tsinghua University Alumni Association of Southern China.

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Thursday, January 31 through Tuesday, February 19, 2019

UCLA Anderson 2019 International Film Festival

The Anderson International Film Festival is a celebration of the school's diversity through the screening of movies from many of the countries that UCLA Anderson students call home. Following the success of last year's inaugural festival, the 2019 festival was held at UCLA Anderson beginning January 31 with a screening every Monday and Tuesday through February 19. It engaged twelve UCLA Anderson professional and identity clubs. During the six days, twelve movies and documentaries were screened from the home countries of many UCLA Anderson students. The film festival included films from Argentina, China, Cambodia, Germany, Italy, India, Korea, Japan and the United States. Each screening was followed by a Q&A session facilitated by first and second year full-time MBA students from that particular country and leaders of the associated student club. These students led conversations around topics that the film addressed and issues that the film raised. Local cuisine from the country/region was also served. The festival raised awareness of the diverse backgrounds of the UCLA Anderson community. 

One example of a film that was screened included "Tampopo,"  sponsored by the Japan America Business Association (JABA).  Japanese filmmaker Juzo Itami wrote and directed in this live action film. The story is about a truck driver who stops at a small family-run noodle shop and decides to help its fledgling business. It is intertwined with various vignettes about the relationship of love and food. JABA felt this film was important to screen as the Japanese have a distinct appreciation of food and the film also addresses the connection with western culture too. Tatsuro Nakajima ('19) co-president of JABA, together with Takaaki Hirabayashi ('19) and Kevin Tente ('20), both members of JABA led the discussion to educate the audience on the Japanese food culture as well as how Japanese people view the western culture. 

Over 70 students from across UCLA Anderson's full-time and fully employed MBA programs attended the screenings with many students attending more than one screening. Many who attended felt they had gained a better understanding and appreciation of the country and culture as a result of attending the screening and participating in the conversation. The festival was presented by the UCLA Anderson Entertainment Management Association and was sponsored by the Center for Global Management, Diversity Office, Center for MEMES, International Business Association and the Anderson Student Association.

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Thursday, January 31, 2019, 11:30 AM-12:30 PM, Korn Convocation Hall

Robertson Lecture Series on Global Business Leadership with Stephan Shakespeare, CEO and Co-Founder, YouGov on "What the World Thinks: Big Data Analytics and Its Impact on Business, the Public Sector and Global Public Opinion"

On Thursday, January 31, 2019, the Center for Global Management hosted Stephan Shakespeare, CEO and co-founder of YouGov, a global big data analytics company and pioneer in internet-based market research and polling, for a fireside chat with Interim Dean Al Osborne before an audience in Korn Convocation Hall. The conversation centered around big data analytics and its impact on business, the public sector and global public opinion.  Shakespeare discussed the company's innovation-led strategy and expansion into international markets. He explained how YouGov collects opinions from around the world and how companies, non-profits and the media look to YouGov to better understand what the world thinks about brands, politics and current affairs to drive their business decisions and identify growth opportunities. He also addressed the impact of big data analytics on business; advanced technology and how it can be used to predict elections and national sentiment; and blockchain and how it empowers users and enables more effective ad targeting as well as the broader implications of cyber threats.  Shakespeare also shared his thoughts on using data for public good to tackle global social issues and how emerging ways of measuring and sharing opinion will create new risks and opportunities for society and business. The conversation also touched on many other topics, including Brexit and data protection. A private luncheon followed in the executive dining where the discussions continued. Stephan Shakespeare co-founded YouGov in 2000. One of the pioneers of internet research, Shakespeare has been the driving force behind YouGov's innovation-led strategy. He was chair of the Data Strategy Board for the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills 2012-2013 and led the Shakespeare Review of Public Sector Information. He was also recently appointed as a commissioner for the Social Metrics Commission, an independent charity dedicated to helping UK policy makers and the public understand and take action to tackle poverty. Around 200 UCLA and UCLA Anderson students, alumni, faculty, staff as well as members of the Los Angeles World Affairs Council and the Los Angeles community gathered in Korn Convocation Hall for the event. Opening remarks were provided by Gerry Sims, MBA candidate from the Class of 2019 and executive vice president of the UCLA Anderson Tech Business Association. The event which was part of the CGM's Robertson Lecture Series on Global Business Leadership was organized by the CGM and supported by the UCLA Anderson Tech Business Association and the Master of Science in Business Analytics program, as well as the Los Angeles World Affairs Council. 

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Tuesday, January 29, 2019, 5:00 PM - 6: 30 PM, Executive Dining Room

Global Networking Reception for Students & Faculty - Strengthening Global Intellectual and Social Connections between Faculty and Students

A key objective of the Center for Global Management is to help strengthen the intellectual and social connections between faculty and students interested in global management and international affairs. On January 29, 2019, prior to the opening of spring quarter course bidding, over 150 students, faculty and CGM partners gathered in the executive dining room for the center's annual networking reception. The reception provided an opportunity for UCLA Anderson students to learn about the global opportunities available at UCLA Anderson both on campus and abroad, including the opportunity to travel abroad with the CGM's global immersion and FEMBA and EMBA international exchange courses, make a global impact with the center's support for international field study projects, learn a language, specialize in global management, enroll in on-campus global management courses and participate in the CGM's programming. The event provided an opportunity for students to interact with faculty who teach global courses as well as faculty and Ph.D. students who have global research and teaching interests. First year students networked with students across degree programs who have traveled abroad, enrolled in global courses and engaged with the center's programming. The center's faculty and executive directors, Professor Sebastian Edwards and Lucy Allard provided welcome remarks and an overview of the CGM's programming and introduced faculty members to the students. The reception provided an opportunity for students currently enrolled in global courses and engaged with the center's programming, including those who have traveled abroad for global immersion courses and international field study primary research to network and share their experiences with others.

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Saturday, January 26, 2019, 8:50 AM - 5:30 PM, Carnesale Commons at UCLA

The Los Angeles Global Health Conference, "Transcending Borders and Transforming Paradigms: Shaping a Future That Unites Us"

The fourth annual Los Angeles Global Health Conference, "Transcending Borders and Transforming Paradigms: Shaping a Future That Unites Us," took place at UCLA on Saturday, January 26. This annual global health conference hosted in Southern California brought together around 400 individuals from various disciplines across academia, NGOs, business, and the public sector to discuss the current status of world health, providing an interactive educational forum to address innovative ways to tackle health disparities-locally and globally. Home to individuals from more than 140 countries speaking 224 different languages, Los Angeles's rich cultural diversity makes it an ideal place to examine the current status of world health.Organized by UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, Fielding School of Public Health, Undergraduate Departments, and USC Keck School of Medicine and affiliated schools, the conference aims to educate and connect with members of the UCLA, USC, CDU and Los Angeles communities about the varying disparities both in our backyards and around the world.

The 2019 conference brought together students, faculty, researchers and professionals across the greater Los Angeles area from various backgrounds to create a dialogue to inform and equip future global health leaders. Given the current global events, priority shifting is key to successfully address health disparities both in our backyard and abroad. The opening keynote address, "Women in Global Health Leadership: The Hard Facts while Debunking Some Myths" was delivered by Michele Barry, MD, FACP, FASTMH, professor of medicine and tropical diseases at Stanford University. She is also the director of the Center for Innovation in Global Health and senior associate dean for global health. As one of the co-founders of the Yale/Stanford Johnson and Johnson Global Health Scholar Award program, Barry has sent over 1500 physicians overseas to underserved areas to help strengthen health infrastructure in low resource settings. 

The closing keynote, "Global Health: Keep the Vision Alive" was delivered by Haile T. Debas, MD, FACS, internationally recognized for his contributions to academic medicine who is widely consulted on issues associated with global health whose career as a physician, researcher, professor, and academic leader spans over four decades in Canada and the United States. 

The day also included numerous breakout sessions with a diverse group of speakers around four specific tracks addressing topics including: immigration, displacement, and vulnerable populations; planetary health and disaster relief; innovation, change and priority setting; and health along the continuum. The Los Angeles Global Health Conference is a student-led project of the Global Health Interest Group at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. The UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management was a silver sponsor of the event.

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Wednesday, January 23, 2019, 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM, A-201 Collins Center, UCLA Anderson

"From Campus to Market: Technology Transfer in the United States and Israel" with Amir Naiberg, President and CEO, UCLA Technology Development Corporation

On Wednesday, January 23 in the late afternoon, students, faculty and members of the local community enjoyed a presentation and moderated discussion with Amir Naiberg, associate vice chancellor and president and CEO of UCLA Technology Development Corporation who shared insights from his experiences in Israel and compared the U.S. and Israel's two systems for turning university innovations into commercialized products. He compared the two countries in terms of entrepreneurial ecosystems, legal, cultural, and financial issues. Naiberg also provided insights from his experience working at the Weizmann Institute of Science's technology transfer company and serving in his current position at UCLA and addressed issues such as how do cutting-edge innovations make their way from university research labs into products sold by for-profit companies and how the path of technology transfer differs in the United States and "Start-Up Nation." Following his presentation, Yoram Cohen, faculty director of the Younes and Soraya Nazarian Center for Israeli Studies moderated the discussion. Amir Naiberg serves as Associate Vice Chancellor and President & CEO of UCLA Technology Development Corporation. The UCLA Technology Development Corporation, a non-profit technology company wholly-owned by UCLA, focuses on better protecting and optimizing the discoveries and inventions developed through UCLA research. Naiberg also leads the UCLA Technology Development Group, a campus wide resource that serves as a gateway to innovation, research and entrepreneurship at UCLA. Through this work, he works in concert with several on-campus incubators and accelerators to further advance innovation, entrepreneurship and research at UCLA. This event was sponsored by the Younes and Soraya Nazarian Center for Israeli Studies, the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management, UCLA School of Law's International and Comparative Law Program and the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures.

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Wednesday, January 23, 2019, 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Dean's Conference Room

Lunch Series with Bart W. Édes, North American Representative of the Asian Development Bank on "Asian Economic Forecasts and Achieving Development Impact"

On Wednesday, January 23, the Center for Global Management hosted a luncheon with Bart W. Édes, North American Representative of the Asian Development Bank (ADB), an international development finance institution dedicated to reducing poverty in Asia and the Pacific.  The luncheon provided an opportunity for interested students from across the various MBA programs to enjoy an informal and interactive conversation and learn about economic forecasts for Asia in 2019 and how the Asian Development Bank achieves development impact - with examples from different countries. Édes addressed the impact of the U.S.-China trade conflict on Asia and the U.S., the region's massive infrastructure investment gap, implications of an aging Asia and promoting gender equality in the Asia Pacific region.  Édes, who has served as the Asian Development Bank's Representative in North America since October 2017, is responsible for mobilizing financing for ADB's developing member countries; sharing development knowledge and experience; establishing and deepening partnerships with public, private and nonprofit organizations in North America; and raising public awareness of ADB in Canada and the United States.  His previous experience at ADB, includes leading teams responsible for knowledge management, social development, gender equity, the social sectors, civil society engagement. Following the luncheon, Édes discussed career opportunities at the ADB with interested graduate students. The luncheon was organized by UCLA the Center for Global Management and supported by the Greater China Business Association and Asian Management Student Association.

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Thursday, January 10, 2019, UCLA Anderson Executive Dining Room

Networking Reception with Students from the University of Sydney Business School’s EMBA and UCLA Anderson EMBA Programs

The Center for Global Management hosted around 20 students from the University of Sydney Business School’s Executive MBA program at UCLA Anderson from January 6-10 for a one-week global management seminar focused on “Finding Opportunity in Disruptive Technology.” The seminar provided participants with an opportunity to complete part of their studies at UCLA and gain valuable global experience and insights through focusing on the innovation and creativity that are such an integral part of the business community in Los Angeles and California, including current academic research and business application around topics such as artificial intelligence, machine learning and deep learning business management impacts as well as business model driven innovation and the proliferation of big data . During the week, students visited Southern California Edison and the Stubbs, Alderton & Markiles Preccelerator. On Thursday, January 10, the students enjoyed a networking reception in UCLA Anderson’s executive dining room, hosted by the CGM where they had an opportunity to meet and connect with first year students from UCLA Anderson’s Los Angeles-based EMBA program.

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Sunday, December 16 – Sunday, December 23, 2018

33 students and 1 alumna travel to Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City for the CGM’s global immersion course to learn about “Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries: Focus on Vietnam,” with George Abe, lecturer in entrepreneurship and faculty director, Strategic Management Research Program

During the same week of winter break, 33 students from all four of UCLA Anderson’s MBA programs - full-time, fully employed, executive and global executive MBA programs, together with one EMBA alumna visited Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City for the in-country week of the CGM’s global immersion course, “Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries: Focus on Vietnam,” led by George Abe, lecturer of entrepreneurship at UCLA Anderson.

Throughout the course, students learned how political and economic policy in Vietnam play out in one of Southeast Asia’s most vibrant economies, Vietnam with a particular focus on entrepreneurship. The course exposed students to a country that is not well understood, but that holds considerable importance to Asia and inevitably on the global scene. During the in-country week, students had opportunities to hear from, engage and network with entrepreneurs in the country, including successful UCLA alumni doing business in Vietnam, through fireside chats, company and accelerator visits as well as through interactive, smaller group discussions. They were able to compare and contrast the start-up scenes in both cities too.

The inaugural sessions in Hanoi, included a presentation and fireside chat with Eric Hsu, a senior commercial services officer at the U.S. Embassy who provided an overview of trade, investment and U.S. companies doing business in Vietnam. This was followed by a fireside chat with Adam Sitkoff, executive director of the American Chamber of Commerce in Hanoi, whose primary mission is to promote American business in the country through the development of trade, commerce and investment between the U.S. and Vietnam. He explained that while Vietnam is dominated by local businesses, he felt that U.S. companies will soon dominate the country and acquire these local businesses. He also addressed the large counterfeit issue that Vietnam is currently facing. To better understand the start-up scene in Hanoi, students visited Vietnam Silicon Valley where the group heard from Vietnam Silicon Valley’s CEO and co-founder, Linh Han who co-founded and leads VSV Accelerator which has invested in, accelerated and mentored over 40 startups in Vietnam since 2014. VSV is the first initiative from the Vietnam Government to target and support startups and venture investors in the country. With its initial success, the VSV Project has been extended until 2020 by the Prime Minister. The project creates an ecosystem of innovations and technology commercialization in Vietnam by combining the Vietnamese entrepreneurial spirit and innovative nature with the most successful practices that the U.S. offers in startup development and mentoring, accelerators, and venture capital funding and investing. Students had an opportunity to break out into groups through interactive sessions with some of its start-up companies. At Vietnam Silicon Valley, students also heard from Aaron Everhart, CEO of Hatch!, who spoke about the entrepreneurial environment in Vietnam and its accelerator program – an intensive, 4-month program for early-stage innovation-based startups whose mission is to capture the value and entrepreneurship spirit of millennials (and the future Generation Z) by creating a community in which individuals can connect, develop and prosper.

In Hanoi, students also learned about the relationship between media and technology through a visit to ICOMM Media, a company that focuses on big data analytics for open source and internal data where they heard from UCLA alumnus, Ngoc Chi Le (M.A. ’10), chief of research. They also learned about the power of social enterprises in the country with a visit to Protec Helmet, and AIP Foundation. Protec is a social enterprise based in Vietnam and founded by U.S. NGO, AIP Foundation. Established in 1999, AIP Foundation works in partnership with local governments and communities around the world to address road safety. The students toured Protec’s helmet factory and heard from Greig Craft, the founder and president who is an internationally recognized road safety expert who provides guidance to governments, business and civil society throughout the developing world.

Students then traveled to Ho Chi Minh City. The inaugural speaker was EMBA alumnus Calvin Lam (’01), CEO of iBasic, an end-to-end designer, manufacturer and retailer of mid-priced underwear which has become one of the most popular brands for women and urban young families. Professor Abe led a fireside chat with Calvin about iBasic as well as his other business ventures which include forestry and a restaurant. They also heard from Crystal Lam, a Berkeley alumna, managing director of Vinawood, a leading global supplier of wood blind and shutter components who shared her experience running and managing a business and manufacturing operation in Vietnam. Later in the week, alumni Alex Wehrmann (’17) director of business development and investment for CLFD and Ken Duong (B.A. ’04), vice president of legal affairs and business development for Duong Business Consulting joined a panel discussion, moderated by Professor Abe. They talked about doing business in Vietnam and addressed the opportunities and challenges in the country and as well as compared and contrasted conducting business in Vietnam with the United States from a business and political perspective. Headquartered in Singapore, CFLD International is the international arm of CFLD, the world's only end-to-end master planner, creator and operator of full-scale New Industry Cities. Headquartered in Orange, California with offices in Vietnam and Thailand, Duong Business Consulting specializes in U.S. –ASEAN multi-lateral trade relations, with a strong emphasis on Vietnam and Thailand. A reception organized by UCLA alumni at the Hard Rock Café provided additional opportunities to meet and network.

Through a visit to Hive Saigon, students compared and contrasted the start-up scene between Hanoi and HCMC. Hive Saigon is a creative co-working workspace in District 2 where students had the opportunity to tour the facility and also hear from and interact with tenants, including both successful startups as well as new start-ups at the early stages of the start-up process. The group also had the opportunity to visit iCare Benefits, a for-profit social enterprise that provides low-income workers in developing countries with an employee benefits program. Trung Dung, the company’s founder and CEO discussed how the program enables manufacturers, social organizations, banks and service providers to serve workers at the bottom of the economic pyramid and provide them the lowest total cost of access to basic life changing products and services. They also visited Vietnam Waste Solutions (VWS), whose mission is to protect the environment by developing and deploying waste management projects and become the leader of waste handling service providers in the country. VWS operates landfills, recycle facilities, composting facilities and treatment facilities and has a contract with the Vietnamese government to collect waste. VWS is a licensed Vietnamese Corporation that is fully owned by California Waste Solutions, Inc. (CWS) a California corporation. Kevin Moore, the managing director of VWS who has more than twenty years of experience in solving environmental waste issues country addressed how the company is introducing new and advanced technologies into the market. During their time in HCMC, students also learned about private equity and venture capital in Vietnam from Johan Nyvene, CEO and managing director of Ho Chi Minh Securities Corporation (HSC), a securities brokerage and equities firm and the legal landscape in the country from Yee Chungseck, a partner at Baker & McKenzie.

During the week, students also experienced local culture, visited key sites of important historic significance and enjoyed local cuisine. They enjoyed a city tour of Hanoi, where they visited the Temple of Literature, a temple of Confucius; One Pillar Pagoda, a historic Buddhist temple; and the Hỏa Lò Hilton Prison, used by the French colonists in French Indochina for political prisoners, and later by North Vietnam for U.S. prisoners of war during the Vietnam War. During this later period, it was known to American POWs as the Hanoi Hilton. They also enjoyed a rickshaw tour through Hanoi’s old quarter. In HCMC, students visited the War Remnants Museum which contains exhibits relating to the Vietnam War and the first Indochina War involving the French colonialists; Independence Palace, the Notre Dame Cathedral and the Post Office. At the end of the week, students visited the Cu Chi tunnels, an immense network of connecting tunnels located in the Cu Chi District of HCMC, which are part of a much larger network of tunnels that underlie much of the country. The Củ Chi tunnels were the location of several military campaigns during the Vietnam War and were the Viet Cong’s base of operations for the Tết Offensive in 1968. On the Sunday, some students joined the optional tour of the Mekong River Delta, a vast maze of rivers, swamps and islands, home to floating markets, Khmer pagodas and villages surrounded by rice paddies. At the conclusion of the week, some students headed to explore other parts of southeast Asia.

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Sunday, December 16 – Sunday, December 23, 2018

40 students visit Chile for the CGM’s global immersion course, “Business Opportunities in Chile, Under A New Market-Friendly Government,” led by Sebastian Edwards, Henry Ford II Chair in International Management

In December over winter break, 40 students from UCLA Anderson’s full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs visited Santiago for the in-country week of the CGM’s global immersion course, “Business Opportunities in Chile, Under A New Market-Friendly Government,” led by distinguished professor and economist Sebastian Edwards, Henry Ford II Chair in International Management and a native of Chile.

During the course, the students learned how economic policy in Chile – the most successful country in Latin America in the last two decades – affects business opportunities. The course put Chile’s case in context with that of the rest of the Latin American nations (special mention was given to Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and Venezuela). The course also analyzed the way in which politics affects both economics and policy options. Before the in-country week, on-campus class sessions addressed some of the most important economic, business, social and political aspects of the country, cultural issues as well as social and business challenges. During the week in-country, students heard from many prominent business leaders, academics, politicians and senior policy makers as well as successful entrepreneurs. A number of high-level Davos-style conversations helped illuminate Chile’s economic and business environments covering a variety of sectors and topics with former ministers, presidential candidates, a former governor of the central bank, CEOs, board chairmen/women, owners and founders. A number of the sessions were held at Centro de Estudios Publicos (CEP), a private non-partisan, non-profit academic foundation dedicated to public issues and the most influential think tank in the country. Students also met with and had the opportunity to hear from successful and influential UCLA and UCLA Anderson alumni and saw firsthand the power of the UCLA brand and network in Chile. Students were amazed by the week, and thoroughly enjoyed their time in-county – they learned a great deal, were inspired, met good friends and had a truly immersive experience together.

The inaugural speakers for the first day provided terrific context and foundation from an economic and political perspective. The inaugural speaker was Rodrigo Vergara, former governor of the Central Bank (December 2011-December 2016) who now serves as vice-chairman of the board of Banco Santander. He provided an excellent overview of “The Chilean Economy.” Firstly, he talked about the trends of the Chilean economy and policies it has followed over the last few decades to explain why it is considered to be a successful economy. Secondly, he addressed what is going on now and the major macro challenges that the country faces today. Patricio Navia, then provided more of a political viewpoint which was equally fascinating. Patricio is a political scientist and columnist who specializes in democratic consolidation, political parties, elections and public opinion in Latin America. He provided his perspective on current affairs, politics today and how that reflects what has happened to Chile over the last 30 years. Students also heard from Rafael Guilisasti, vice chairman of Viña Concha y Toro (a family business and Chile’s leading wine producer) and president of the board of SQM controlling partners, the world’s biggest lithium producer. They learned about the global wine industry, importance of the industry to Chile and its evolution over the years. They also learned more about lithium and that up until very recently, Chile had the largest lithium deposits in the world – it was recently surpassed by Australia. Francisca Castro, director of Antofagasta Minerals also addressed the group. Antofagasta PLC Group is the largest private copper company in Chile. She discussed the mining and copper industry in the country and its importance to the Chilean economy and explained that today, the drivers in any decision are around sustainable growth, community and the environment. Students also heard from Maximo Pacheco, former CEO of International Paper and also former minister of energy on the “Energy Revolution in Chile.” Chile is a country that is undergoing a complete energy transformation and he explained that today the world is looking to Chile because of its energy development. However, Chile faces the difficult challenge of balancing economic growth, energy security and environmental sustainability.

Alejandro Bezanilla, CEO of AFP Habitat discussed the Chilean pension system and its future. This was a topic that had been covered quite extensively in class so students were quite familiar with the issues at hand and were able to ask very intelligent and well-informed questions. AFP Habitat is a publicly held corporation formed in 1981 when the new individual pension system was introduced in Chile. Alejandro described the pension system, challenges of the system and its performance. The Chilean pension system is currently under scrutiny and he addressed the different sources that the discontent comes from. Students also heard from Antonio Gil, CEO of Moneda Asset Management, the most successful boutique asset management firm in Chile that invests throughout the region, from Mexico to Patagonia across the capital structure in both equity and credit securities. Sustainable investment is key to what Moneda does and ESG has been part of the company’s DNA from the beginning. Later in the week, students heard from Gonzalo Undurraga, CEO of Explora, a family-owned business and luxury hotel owner and operator, focused on South America - its hotels serve as the base camp for exploration. The first property of Explora in Patagonia, launched in 1993 is the only hotel situated in the heart of the Torres del Paine National Park. He talked about the Explora brand, the business model of the company and its strategy. When discussing Explora’s business, he explained that it is about purpose and impact. He also talked about benefits of the brand and the company’s positioning – which inspires care and conservation. Gisela Escobar, vice president of corporate affairs for LATAM Airlines, provided an overview of the airline industry which she described as an extremely challenging and attractive industry for many reasons, yet it is also an extremely dynamic, high growth industry where business models are constantly changing. She explained that Latin America is the fastest growing region in the world for air travel driven by low penetration of air travel and that Chile is the most developed air market in Latin America. Expansion in the region is what has driven LATAM.

Students were also very fortunate to hear from two of the three co-founders of Cornershop, Juan Pablo Cuevas, COO and Daniel Undurraga, CTO and their terrific success story. Cornershop is a leading online marketplace for on-demand delivery from supermarkets, pharmacies and specialty food retailers in Mexico and Chile. The company was recently acquired by Walmart in September 2018 for $225 million. Students visited iF and met its founder Alejandra Mustakis. iF is a center of entrepreneurship and innovation in Chile which consists of an inclusive and collaborative ecosystem that brings together research, laboratories, business accelerators, workshops and events to provide entrepreneurs and innovators with the opportunity to carry out their ideas through creation and development. Students enjoy visiting and learning about centers of innovation and entrepreneurship in other countries and the visit was a complement to other sessions. At a co-working space, Manola Sanchez, former dean of UAI Business School who now serves on the board of Bci and was the first Chilean woman to obtain an MBA from Harvard addressed the group. She is also a member of a think tank trying to elevate Chile’s role and reputation as a financial hub. After discussing Bci, a leading financial institution in Chile by assets with national and international presence, she talked about her own career path. During the week, students were exposed to a number of extremely successful and influential female leaders in the business, political as well as the art worlds in Chile. They were inspired and really enjoyed the personal stories of speakers which made them real and relatable.

Professor Edwards likes to incorporate an art/cultural session into the week which is very appreciated by students and adds another dimension to the experience. In addition to the CEP, during the week students visited different venues, for example CorpArtes, a state of the art facility where artists exhibit. Here, they heard from UCLA alumna Bernardita Mandiola (B.A. ’91), an art historian and director of Fundacion AMA who talked about the Latin American art market and the ecosystem of players in the industry. She explained that the international market for Latin American art did not really happen until the end of the 19th century and then it really became important in the early 20th century, when Latin American artists started to make up the international avant-garde. On the Wednesday, the group traveled to the Llay-Llay region of Valparaiso to visit Jorge Schmidt & Co., a family-owned and operated business and currently the largest individual avocado producer in Chile, with 3,700 acres of avocado trees and an important grower in the Chilean fruit sector. The company’s growth over the last ten years has been explosive. Students enjoyed a tour of the packing house/plant to learn about the company’s operations and the importance of vertical integration. They then visited its second, new state of the art facility that will be fully automated. Following the tour, students were then greeted by Jorge Schmidt and his family at their residence where they generously hosted everyone for a wonderful BBQ lunch.

During the final academic day in Chile, students visited Kingston Family Vineyard in the Casablanca Valley, which has been recognized among the best wineries in Chile and for “making some of Chile’s best pinots” (Food & Wine). The students had read the Kingston Family Vineyards Stanford GSB case and so were familiar with it when they arrived. They were greeted by Tim Kingston, the owner and enjoyed a case study discussion with Tim, Marco Vera and Alex, one of the fellows at the vineyard. They were given a tour of the winery and broadly discussed the case and story of the winery. During dinner, they enjoyed wonderful wines, paired with the meal and the spectacular views over the Casablanca Valley.

During the week, students also had the opportunity to hear from and network with UCLA alumni. At the opening dinner which took place at Castillo Forestal, a heritage building, the group was joined by the president of the UCLA Anderson Chilean alumni network, Guillermo Tagle (’91), president of Credicorp Capital. CGM advisory board member, Joseph Barragan (B.A. ’77, ’79), former managing director for J.P. Morgan Chase who previously lived and worked in Santiago and had responsibility across Latin America joined the dinner and was also in attendance for the week. On the Wednesday evening, alumni gathered at the Ritz Carlton hotel for an alumni panel discussion and networking reception. Around 20 alumni and students home for the holidays attended. Professor Edwards moderated a conversation with Andres Echeverria (’93), president and portfolio manager for Frontal Trust; Ricardo Garcia (M.A. ’89), CEO of Camanchaca; and Alejandro Gonzalez Dale (’01), CFO of Falabella on their career trajectory post UCLA Anderson as well as their thoughts and insights on business opportunities in Chile under a new market-friendly government from both their personal as well as industry perspective. The panel discussion was very well received and the networking reception was a tremendous success. It was wonderful to see so many alumni and students networking together and the significant strength and influence of the UCLA /Anderson brand and network in Chile.

Time in Santiago would not be complete without a visit to the Museum of Memory and Human Rights, a Chilean museum dedicated to commemorate the victims of human rights violations during the military regime of Augusto Pinochet between 1973 and 1990. At the museum, the students were addressed by Chilean Senator Ximena Rincon who described the coup d’etat in Chile, its consequences and the transition to democracy and the subsequent process in the country. Students were then given a tour of the museum which they found to be extremely moving and emotional.

During their time in Chile, students also enjoyed a Santiago city tour. They visited St. Lucia Hill - it was at the foot of this hill that Pedro de Valdivia founded the city of Santiago in 1541. They also visited La Moneda, Presidential Palace, Plaza de Armas, Mercado Central and enjoyed 360 degree views of Santiago from Sky Costanera, the tallest building in Latin America. Some students also hiked San Cristobal Hill and visited the Bella Vista area, known as one of the most significant meeting points for Santiago’s bohemian life with art galleries, jewelry shops, colorful houses, several restaurants and an active night life. Students traveled a lot by metro and on foot to experience the city the way locals travel. At the end of the week, students enjoyed a leisurely day out to the cities of Valparaíso and Viña del Mar. During a boat and walking tour of Valparaiso, they learned about the history and importance of this major city, seaport, and educational center in the commune of Valparaíso that has been the headquarters for the Chilean National Congress since 1990. They walked through Plaza Sotomayor, past the monument that marks the tomb of Arturo Prat, the Chilean war hero and the Command in Chief Palace of La Armada, and rode on the funicular, known as “Ascensor El Peral.” They walked through the streets that were filled with some interesting street art. Street art had historically started as a form of protest under the Pinochet dictatorship. Decades later, street art is more popular than ever. Local and international artists have developed unique styles and tested them out all over. Later that day, they visited Vina del Mar known as the “Garden City” to enjoy some sun and ocean air. On the Sunday, some students joined the optional activity to the private Lodge Andino in the beautiful foothills of the Andes mountains to enjoy some hiking or horseback riding. Others stayed in Santiago and some headed to other parts of Latin America.

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Thursday, November 29, 2018, 6:00 PM, Raleigh Studios, Hollywood

2018 John Wooden Global Leadership Award Dinner Benefitting the 2018 John Wooden Fellows and Honoring Reed Hastings, Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Netflix

On Thursday, November 29, 2018, UCLA Anderson recognized Reed Hastings, co-founder and CEO of Netflix with the John Wooden Global Leadership Award, at a gala dinner held at Raleigh Studios in Hollywood. The distinction, named for legendary UCLA basketball coach, author and leadership expert John Wooden (1910–2010), is presented each year to an exceptional leader whose leadership style and service to the community reflect the same high standards of performance, integrity and ethical values set by Wooden.

“Reed Hastings has demonstrated leadership that is fueled by fundamental values – integrity, excellence, respect and collaboration,” said UCLA Anderson Interim Dean Al Osborne. “In the two decades since he co-founded Netflix, Reed has disrupted the status quo and led a revolution in the way entertainment is created and shared all over the world.”

In an onstage discussion with Susan Wojcicki (’98), YouTube CEO, Hastings commented on his award and lessons from Coach Wooden. “To be a great leader, you need to be a great person – trying to be the best person you can be. It’s all about working on yourself.”

Hastings co-founded Netflix in 1997. In 1991, he founded Pure Software, which made tools for software developers. After a 1995 IPO and several acquisitions, Pure was acquired by Rational Software in 1997. Hastings is an active educational philanthropist and served on the California State Board of Education from 2000 to 204. He is currently on the board of several educational organizations, including KIPP, Pahara and the City Fund. Hastings is also a board member of Facebook and was on the board of Microsoft from 2007 to 2012. He received his B.A. from Bowdoin College in 1983 and an MCSC in artificial intelligence from Stanford University in 1988. Between Bowdoin and Stanford, Hastings served in the Peace Corps as a high school math teacher in Swaziland.

The audience of more 700 included UCLA Anderson Board of Advisors members and other generous supporters, along with members of Coach Wooden’s family, members of the Anderson family, UCLA’s women’s gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field together with Basketball Hall of Famers Jamaal Wilkes (B.A. ’74) and Keith Erickson joined past Wooden Fellows, current UCLA Anderson students, alumni and faculty for a ceremony that included a special appearance and Coach Wooden tribute by Lynn Shackelford (B.A. ’69), former professional basketball player and broadcaster who played under Coach Wooden. Remembering his experience on the UCLA team, he remarked, “Coach always preached that what made him different as a coach was his emphasis on effort, not results. He practiced what he preached.”

Net proceeds from the annual dinner fund four $35,000 John Wooden Global Leadership Fellowships, given to deserving UCLA Anderson students who embody Coach Wooden’s leadership ideals and commitment to improving the lives of others. During the ceremony, the four 2018 fellowship recipients Jessica Barnette (MPH ’14, FEMBA ‘19), Leah Maddock Loh (MPH ’05, EMBA ‘19), Gerry Sims (FTMBA ’19) and Ryan Tan (UCLA-NUS EMBA ‘19) were recognized and awarded the John Wooden Global Leadership Fellowship, which is among the most prestigious honors Anderson students can receive. They took the stage to express their thoughts on what Coach Wooden’s values-based leadership means to them. Wooden Fellows are honored because they possess his focus on ethics, team spirit, skill, hard work and loyalty, along with a commitment to constant learning, continual improvement and innovation.

UCLA Anderson, in partnership with Coach John Wooden’s family, honors one exceptional leader each year with this prestigious award for his or her exemplary leadership and service to the community. Past recipients of the John Wooden Global Leadership Award include: Kevin Plank, chairman and CEO, Under Armour (2017); W. James McNerney Jr., retired president, CEO and chairman, the Boeing Company (2016); Ursula Burns, chairman and CEO of Xerox (2015); Paul E. Jacobs, executive chairman of Qualcomm Inc. (2014); Bob Iger, chairman and CEO of The Walt Disney Company (2013); Indra Nooyi, chairman and CEO of PepsiCo (2012); Peter Ueberroth, managing director of Contrarian Group (2011); Frederick W. Smith, chairman, president and CEO of FedEx (2010); Kenneth Chenault, chairman and CEO of American Express (2009); and Howard Schultz, chairman, president and CEO of Starbucks (2008).

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Tuesday, November 20, 2018 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Dean's Conference Room

Lunch Series with Grace Huang (’02), Co-founder and CEO, iPinYou on “Technology Development in the Marketing Space”

On November 20, the Center for Global Management welcomed UCLA Anderson alumna Grace Huang (’02), co-founder and CEO of iPinYou to campus to enjoy an informal and interactive conversation over lunch with students interested in learning about technology development in the marketing space. Huang founded iPinYou six years after graduating from UCLA Anderson and is responsible for strategic planning and operational management for the company. She is a branding and marketing expert and prior to iPinYou, worked for Proctor & Gamble in the United States and also McKinsey & Co. in Beijing. Founded in 2008, iPinYou is China's leading demand-side platform (DSP) that helps global brands identify, analyze, and engage Chinese consumers to succeed in the China market. Headquartered in Beijing, with offices in Shanghai, Guangzhou and Silicon Valley, the company has received the "Best in Class" award from Google DoubleClick, Baidu and Tencent for its programmatic marketing platform, and obtained a CNY 500 million in pre-IPO investment from strategic partner China Mobile and other investors. First, second and third year students from UCLA Anderson’s full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs, including students specializing in global management gathered for an informal and interactive conversation with Huang who started her entrepreneurial journey while at UCLA Anderson. During lunch, she discussed technology development in the marketing space; her career trajectory since graduating from UCLA Anderson from working with P&G’s marketing group to joining McKinsey and providing marketing strategy services to global companies; and her path towards the founding of iPinYou and its highly successful market intelligence platform and data-driven approach to market analysis and audience insights for the world’s largest consumer market, connecting brands and customers. Her first investor was UCLA Anderson alumnus Fritz Demopoulos (’97). Huang also commented on what inspired her to start iPinYou and explained how technology is changing how advertising and marketing works and described the differences in the landscapes between China and the U.S. The lunch provided a wonderful opportunity for students to hear insights, experiences and the personal journey of one of UCLA Anderson’s successful alumna entrepreneurs. The lunch was organized by the CGM with support from the AnderTech Business Association, Entrepreneur Association and Greater China Business Association.

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Friday, November 16, 2018, 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Dean's Conference Room

Lunch Series with Javier Guzman, Vice Governor of the Central Bank of Mexico on "Mexico's Economic Outlook and Monetary Policy"

On Friday, November 16, UCLA welcomed to campus Javier Guzman, vice governor of the Central Bank of Mexico. He was joined by Marlen Marroquin, executive regional director at the U.S.-Mexico Chamber of Commerce California Regional Chapter. Following a campus tour and meeting with Cindy Fan, vice provost for global engagement at UCLA and Professor Ruben Hernandez-Leon, director of the UCLA Center for Mexican Studies, students from the full-time, executive and fully employed MBA programs had a unique opportunity to hear from the vice governor during an interactive lunchtime conversation organized by UCLA Anderson's Latin American Business Association and Center for Global Management. 

During the luncheon, Guzman provided an overview of the general situation in Mexico, including the economic outlook for the country. He also discussed monetary policy and the important role of the Central Bank in the financial stability of the country. Various topics were also addressed including trade negotiations, the recent presidential elections as well as trends in the world economy. Economic activity in Mexico has remained resilient despite political and economic uncertainty in the first half of 2018, caused by the lead up to the elections and the U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade negotiations. Guzman also explained what Mexico is facing on the domestic front.  Despite the resiliency, the country continues to face challenges that include raising living standards by reducing poverty and inequality, as well as addressing crime and corruption. According to a recent IMF report, to tackle these challenges and boost growth in a way that will benefit a wider share of the population, reforms will need to focus on raising public investment and social spending, as well as re-invigorating the structural reform agenda with emphasis on strengthening the rule of law, fighting corruption, and reducing labor market informality. The luncheon provided a terrific opportunity for students to hear insights, perspectives and deep knowledge around these critical topics from such a prominent and accomplished figure in Mexico. Guzman has served in this role since February, 2013 and will remain in the position through December, 2020. From 1994 to 1999, he served as an advisor, alternate executive director, and executive director at the International Monetary Fund, representing Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Spain, and Venezuela. He also worked as an advisor for Ernesto Zedillo, former President of Mexico, in the High Level Group on Financing for Development, established by the UN Secretary General in support of the International Conference on Financing for Development in Monterrey.  In 2008, the Center for Latin American Studies' (CEMLA) Assembly elected him General Director of that institution. He held that position from January 2010 to February 2013.  The luncheon was organized by UCLA Anderson's Latin American Business Association and Center for Global Management and supported by the United States-Mexico Chamber of Commerce California Regional Chapter. 

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Thursday, November 15, 2018, 7:00 PM, Sofitel Beverly Hills

The Trade War and Global Food Security with Jim Collins, CEO of DowDupont's Agricultural Division

As trade tensions mount with China, retaliatory tariffs jeopardize the livelihood of U.S. farmers, ranchers and agricultural and food businesses across the country. They also threaten to raise prices of food for consumers and increase pressure on food security due to limited market access for producers in developing countries. On Thursday, November 15, Jim Collins, CEO of Corteva, DowDupont's agricultural division, one of the world's largest crop seed and protection companies addressed the Los Angeles World Affairs Council during a special dinner discussion on the state of the global agricultural markets and food security. The Center for Global Management is a member of the LAWAC who generously invited UCLA Anderson students to attend the special dinner discussion on this important issue.  Collins was joined in conversation by Jennifer Sirangelo, president and CEO of 4-H Council. "We believe in fair trade and not using food as a weapon," said Collins. He added that Corteva respects "what the U.S. government is doing today with regards to protecting intellectual property but not food." He explained that soybean exports to the U.S. have decreased significantly, acknowledging that there is a generation of American farmers who will be at negative growth for the next few years. Collins added that an agricultural company must put farmers at the center. He also suggested that agribusiness has a huge role to play in responding to climate change and that technological advances are changing the industry and creating new job opportunities. He listed areas that businesses like Corteva are hiring for, including engineers, data analysts and drone pilots. Farming also doesn't look like what you might expect when it comes to gender. "Women outnumber men by a factor of 2 to 1 globally in farming," Collins said, to the surprise of the audience. He encouraged the audience to research the facts so that they can use their voice and support government policies in food science. Prior to his role at DowDuPont, Collins was executive vice president of DuPont with responsibility for the company's Agriculture segment, which included DuPont Pioneer and Crop Protection. A supporter of youth education and leadership, Collins served on the executive board of the Chester County Council Boy Scouts of America and received an honorary American FFA Degree for his efforts to promote Agriculture education with youth in the United States.

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November 13-16, 2018

International Education Week 2018, "Connecting Across Borders" at UCLA

International Education Week (IEW) is a joint initiative of the U.S. Departments of State and Education to celebrate the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide which ran from November 13-16, 2018.

In celebration of IEW, UCLA offered a series of events to celebrate international education and exchange, campus diversity, global perspectives and global citizenship on campus. The UCLA International Institute, together with a team of campus partners, including UCLA Study Abroad, Dashew Center for International Students and Scholars, UCLA Residential Life and the UCLA Library planned a weeklong celebration of international education with around 30 cosponsors, including the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management. The week showcased UCLA's extensive international education resources that were informative, fun and intellectually stimulating. Featured events included information sessions on FLAS/Fulbright, funding and leveraging the study abroad experience, Peace Corps recruitment, latest developments in international justice as well as a panel discussion on careers in a globalized world. 

On Tuesday, November 13, the "UCLA Global Conversation," the featured event of UCLA's celebration of IEW 2018 took place in UCLA's Powell Library which attracted over 100 attendees from across campus as well as invited dignitaries and friends of UCLA. The keynote address, "Education for the Global Era" was delivered by Marcelo Suarez-Orozco, Wasserman Dean, UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies. Welcome and introductory remarks were provided by Scott Waugh, executive vice chancellor and provost and Cindy Fan, vice provost for international studies and global engagement. Dean Suarez-Orozco's research focuses on cultural psychology and psychological anthropology, with an emphasis on globalization, education and global migration.

One of the major goals of vice provost Cindy Fan who also oversees the International Institute, is to enable as many UCLA students as possible - regardless of discipline or major - to gain international experience via campus classes, study abroad, international research, internships and/or work opportunities. International experience opens students' lives to new perspectives and other cultures. Studying and volunteering abroad teaches Bruins that people the world over have a stake in one another's success and share many problems that require global perspectives and collaborative solutions.

The UCLA International Institute seeks to prepare a new generation of leaders who have direct experience of the world. In addition to helping them study or intern abroad, that means encouraging students to study the histories, politics and cultures of other countries, to master foreign languages and to develop the cultural sensitivity to work effectively with people across borders. All of these goals, together with the campus units that support them, are celebrated during International Education Week.

UCLA offers an amazingly broad array of international resources that include the programs of the UCLA Study Abroad/ International Education Office and the many internationally oriented degree programs and research centers across campus (including those offered by the UCLA International Institute), all of which are supported by the UCLA Library.

Campus resources also include the programs that promote global connection, international understanding and cultural sensitivity at the Dashew Center for International Students and Scholars as well as the activities and events of UCLA Residential Life that support international students in undergraduate residence halls and graduate housing.

In addition, many UCLA student associations are international in nature, including those that highlight the contributions of international students to campus life and those that focus on international performing arts, discussions of international topics and development projects in foreign countries.

Globally oriented research centers are an integral part of UCLA campus life, including the Center for World Health at the Geffen School of Medicine, the Center for Global Management at the UCLA Anderson School of Management, the Promise Institute for Human Rights at UCLA School of Law and the UCLA Blum Center on Poverty and Health in Latin America.

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Thursday, November 8, 2018, 4:30 PM, Anderson Afternoon North Terrace

Celebrating Diwali at UCLA Anderson

To celebrate the international diversity of UCLA Anderson, the Center for Global Management actively supports cultural events hosted by international student clubs such as the South Asian Business Association (SABA). SABA promotes familiarity and understanding of the South Asian culture and traditions among Anderson students during their annual flagship event, the Diwali Festival. Diwali or Deepavali is the festival of lights that marks the victory of good over evil. It is celebrated every year in the fall, usually in the months of October and November in the northern hemisphere (spring in the southern hemisphere). On November 8, 2018, over 400 domestic and international students attended the weekly Anderson Afternoons which was transformed to celebrate the Diwali Festival. UCLA Anderson's North Terrace was decorated with diyas (lamps), traditional Indian food was served and members of SABA were dressed in traditional Indian attire. Various aspects of the Indian culture were on display with performances of a Bhangra dance performed by the UCLA undergraduate Bhangra troupe, known as Bruin Bhangra; and an acoustic Hindi song performance and a Bollywood dance showcase by SABA members. Other activities to engage the over 400 attendees included a mehndi/henna hand tattoo stall and a photo booth.

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Thursday, November 8, 2018, 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM, UCLA Anderson Executive Dining Room

Global Management Lecture Series: “The Creative Economy in Brazil: Transforming Cultural Diversity in Development” with Sérgio Sá Leitão, Minister of Culture, Brazil

Cultural and creative activities are Brazil’s vocations and are an important part of the DNA of the country’s society that contribute greatly to its economic and social development. On Thursday, November 8, in the late afternoon following a tour of the UCLA campus, Sérgio Sá Leitão, Brazil’s Minister of Culture visited UCLA Anderson together with Márcia Loureiro, the Brazilian Consul General for Los Angeles. He addressed an engaged group of students from across the various degree programs at UCLA Anderson as well as undergraduate, graduate and doctoral students from across campus studying law, political science and economics, for a presentation and conversation on the creative economy in Brazil and how such a large and culturally diverse country can be a driver for development. He discussed the vast potential in the creative economy and suggested that to improve and realize the potential, there is a need to stimulate cultural entrepreneurship and its connections with tourism and technology in every region and in all creative sectors. Brazil has to rise from a commodity-based economy to an economy of knowledge and creativity. He explained that the creative economy generates jobs, increases incomes, provides opportunities to local talent, engages the youth, improves quality of life, builds networks and connections, boosts innovation, strengthens identity and ultimately promotes the development of the country. The creative economy is of strategic economic and social importance and in addition to being a source of development, it also fosters inclusion. Before assuming his current position as Minister of Culture, Sérgio Sá Leitão was Rio de Janeiro’s Secretary of Culture, and was also the Ministry’s chief of staff during Gilberto Gil’s tenure. Previously, he served as the director of the National Film Agency and the CEO of RioFilme, and has been a Presidential advisor for the Brazilian Development Bank as well as served on numerous boards with significant experience in the private sector too. The event was organized by the UCLA Anderson School of Management’s Latin American Business Association and Center for Global Management and supported by the UCLA Center for Brazilian Studies and Department of Spanish & Portuguese and the Consulate General of Brazil, Los Angeles.

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Thursday, November 1, 2018, 6:30 PM - 9:30 PM, UCLA Anderson Executive Dining Room

Global Business & Policy Forum “Trade Wars and the Impact on the United States and California"

Although progress has been made with renewing NAFTA and agreements have been reached with Mexico and Canada, the risks associated with ever increasing tariffs between China and the U.S. could have grave consequences globally. What benefits come from the international exchange of goods and services, which are risked by a trade war? What is unfair trade, and which countries pay for the taxes and other barriers to trade? Who are the winners and losers from a trade war? What policy responses are appropriate for dealing with bilateral imbalances, if any? What are the consequences of tariffs targeting selected countries and what allows an "American First" agenda that was not an option after WWII? On November 1, the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management and UCLA School of Law's Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy  hosted its inaugural global business and policy forum of the academic year. Ed Leamer, UCLA Anderson distinguished economist who has served on the Councils of Economic Advisors or Governor Wilson, Governor Schwarzenegger, and Los Angeles Mayor Garcetti was joined by Stephen Cheung (B.S. ’00, MSW ’07). Cheung is former director of international trade at the Port of Los Angeles and now president of World Trade Center Los Angeles (WTCLA) which works to support the development of international trade and business opportunities for Southern California companies as the leading international trade association, trade service organization and trade resource in the Los Angeles region. Leamer and Cheung addressed these aforementioned questions, the ramifications for the United States and the impact of trade policy on business investment in California and Los Angeles. They also discussed the trade wars occurring around the world and implications for the global economy. The world’s two largest economies have squared off in a tit-for-tat trade war that threatens to disrupt international commerce. However, in spite of concerns about the risk of a full-blown trade war with China, the forecast for the U.S. economy is one of growth, albeit slower. California which boasts the world’s fifth largest economy, remains one of the most prosperous states, with a strong market that is expected to continue to grow. However, according to the recent UCLA Anderson Forecast, an economic slowdown is on the horizon. Looming over the forecast is the uncertainty of the current administration’s trade policies and the beginnings of a currency contagion that is enveloping a few developing economies (e.g. the Turkish lira and Argentine peso). What is unknown is the effect that any trade policy will have on business investment. China is our number one trading partner and if there’s one region in the United States that will be most impacted by this particular trade war, it’s going to be California and Los Angeles. A presentation by Leamer, which focused on the theory of international trade and posed many pertinent questions, was followed by a discussion by Cheung on the facts. They were then joined CGM’s faculty director, Sebastian Edwards, Henry Ford II Chair in International Management for a moderated discussion. Over dinner, there were many interactive table conversations where specific questions were discussed among the students, including: What public policies are needed to maintain the quality of life of America’s middle class? What public policies might protect America’s intellectual property? Students were also asked to comment on what public policies they feel are best for the youth of America. The discussion engaged 80 students and faculty from the UCLA Anderson School of Management and the UCLA School of Law. The Global Business and Policy Forum is a collaborative partnership between UCLA Anderson’s Center for Global Management and the UCLA School of Law's Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy.

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Thursday, October 18, 2018 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Dean's Conference Room

Lunch Series with CGM Advisory Board Member, Chris Legallet (B.A. ’83, ’88), Partner, Newport Asia LLC on “Global Investment Management”

On Thursday, October 18, in advance of the Center for Global Management’s fall board meeting, the CGM hosted a luncheon for students with advisory board member, Chris Legallet (B.A. ’83, ’88), a partner at the pioneer investment management firm, Newport Asia LLC, where he has been for almost 15 years managing partnerships investing in Asian and Chinese equity markets for high net-worth families, endowments, and institutions. First, second and third year students from UCLA Anderson’s full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs, including students specializing in global management and with an interest in global careers, gathered together for an informal and interactive conversation. Legallet discussed his unique career track and 30 years of investment experience in Asia’s emerging markets; his take on the development and future of Asia’s capital markets, China and its economy, and U.S.-China relations; as well as his life and travels throughout Asia. He also commented on the investment of China and India in Africa and challenges for U.S. investors in China and for Chinese investors in the United States. Legallet explained that he was a serial brown bag lunch attendee back in the 1980s and found the sessions immensely valuable, as he pondered his own post-graduation moves. He studied economics and Chinese as a UCLA undergrad, including a semester at Nankai University in Tianjin, China in 1982, which opened his eyes to the immense opportunity emerging in China. Hooked, he returned to China immediately after graduating, eventually settling in Hong Kong. In 1986, he returned to UCLA full-time for his MBA, which led him to Salomon Brothers in New York, where he advised institutions on Asian investments. In 1992, he switched careers from Wall Street to Investment Management, joining Jupiter Asset Management as a fund manager in Hong Kong. While there, he managed mutual funds investing in equities across the region, including the Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, Korea, Indonesia, and one of the first Chinese mutual funds available for foreigners in 1994. Legallet has been working with his current partners at Newport Asia LLC in San Francisco since 1997, where he currently manages partnerships investing in Asian and Chinese equity markets for high net-worth families, endowments, and institutions. The lunch provided a really wonderful opportunity for students to hear insights, experiences and the personal journey from one of the CGM’s distinguished and accomplished board members. The lunch was supported by the Investment Finance Association, the Asian Student Management Association and Greater China Business Association.

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Saturday, October 13, 2018, 2:00 PM - 6:00 PM, A-202, Collins Center

“Symposium: Social Networks in a Transnational World: Chinese and Indian Entrepreneurs in the United States” 

On Saturday, October 13, the UCLA Asia Pacific Center and Center for India and South Asia co-organized a Symposium that focused on Chinese and Indian immigrant entrepreneurship in a global era. The Center for Global Management was a sponsor of the event. Through the inter-center, interdisciplinary collaboration and comparative case studies of the two largest immigrant groups – Chinese and Indians-in the United States, the symposium examined the changing nature of immigrant entrepreneurship in the context of globalization through a review of the following phenomena. One, how do social networks among the Indian and Chinese diasporas shape the formation of entrepreneurial cultures? Two, and conversely, how do entrepreneurial activities shape the formation of diasporic communities and networks? The symposium reviewed the global and local forces that have transformed the ways in which immigrants start and run their own business, the importance of local and transnational networks in business, and the ways in which entrepreneurs and scholars understand the phenomenon.

The full-house symposium included an academic panel on “Immigration and Changing Dynamics of Immigrant Entrepreneurship” with five scholars presenting their papers and research findings. This was followed by a stimulating and insightful roundtable discussion with four frontline entrepreneurs on “Entrepreneurial Cultures and Networks,” moderated by Professor Min Zhou, director of the UCLA Asia Pacific Center. The key themes that were explored included: immigration and entrepreneurship; entrepreneurial spirit and ethos, motivations and barriers, the formation of diasporic social networks, homeland connections and entrepreneurial development, and other related topics. Interim Dean, Al Osborne provided opening remarks together with Cindy Fan vice provost for international studies and global engagement; Chris Erickson, senior associate vice provost and director of the UCLA International Institute; and Min Zhou and Akhil Gupta, directors of the UCLA Asia Pacific Center (APC) and Center for India and South Asia (CISA).

This symposium which attracted over 70 students, academics and entrepreneurs was part of the UCLA joint-center collaboration between the Asia Pacific Center and the Center for India and South Asia. This program was made possible by a Cross-Center Collaborative Project Award from the UCLA International Institute, with additional support from the UCLA Anderson School’s Center for Global Management and Price Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, together with the UCLA Asian American Studies Center.

This event was co-organized by the UCLA Asia Pacific Center and Center for India and South Asia and cosponsored by the UCLA International Institute, the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management and Price Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, as well as the UCLA Asian American Studies Center.

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Thursday, October 11, 2018, 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM, A-202, Collins Center

"Building Futures, Saving Pasts: Creating Businesses Using Cultural Heritage" 

Many of the world's poorest people co-exist with humanity's most important cultural heritage sites. Both these communities and the sites are in danger. The Sustainable Preservation Initiative (SPI) creates sustainable community businesses which utilize local cultural heritage in the developing world. Through this work, the SPI has not only built the futures of vulnerable communities (particularly women), but also saved the past through incentivizing local heritage protection. On Thursday, October 11, the Center for Global Management joined Impact@Anderson and the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA in hosting archaeologist and community business developer, Paul Burtenshaw for a conversation on the results of his work and a discussion on how the SPI's methodology - the "SPI Business School" - creates sustainable economic impact and how cultural heritage is an asset for local sustainable development.  Over 50 attendees joined the discussion, including students from the full-time, fully employed and executive programs as well as students from the greater UCLA community to learn more about the economic opportunities that these cultural sites can provide and economic strategies that can be developed to benefit both the local communities as well as the heritage sites which are under threat. And how SPI provides communities with the tools they need to leverage these sites responsibly and help them thrive as communities. Paul Burtenshaw is the director of projects at the Sustainable Preservation Initiative (SPI). He is both an archaeologist, having carried out fieldwork in the Middle East, South America and West Africa, and a community business developer. Burtenshaw holds a Ph.D. with a focus on using cultural heritage as a sustainable development resource. SPI's methodology of community development was developed by Burtenshaw and has recently been adopted by the United Nations.

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Wednesday, September 26, 2018, 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM, United Kingdom

Worldwide Welcome Week Evening and Discussion on “No Deal Brexit – The Future of the City of London and the Financial Sector,” One Great George Street, London, U.K.

On Wednesday, September 26, the UCLA Anderson Alumni Network: UK Chapter held their Worldwide Welcome Weeks event in London. The evening featured a discussion on the future of the City of London post-Brexit with a distinguished panel of experts from London’s banking, financial services, and asset management sectors. The panel discussion focused on the history and future of Brexit—and the implications for the UK and the EU.

Moderator, CGM founding board member Toby Raymond (’86), managing director of Access Equity Management Ltd., pictured second from the right, moderated and led the discussion tracing Brexit from its origin to the present and forecasting the final culmination of the movement. Panelists included Iain Corby (’01) deputy chief executive officer of GambleAware, pictured far left and Marilou Calara (’86 UCLA, ’90 Haas), chief operating officer for EMEA Investments at Citi Private Bank, pictured second from the left. Jill Baldauf (’81), associate dean of alumni relations, far right, opened the program and shared a video greeting from interim dean Al Osborne.

Panelists discussed how changes in London, Paris and Frankfurt effect Switzerland in an increasingly globalized world; the future facing London on March 30, 2019 after Britain prepares to leave the EU; and thoughts on whether London will emerge unscathed or whether the loss of the passporting right will herald the start of a new era in a fintech-driven economy. Attending were alumni from UCLA Anderson’s full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs spanning 1981 – 2018, as well as UCLA undergraduates, LLM program graduates and prospective students. The discussion was followed by a networking reception.

Worldwide Welcome Weeks (WWW) is an annual event series presented by UCLA Anderson’s Office of Alumni Relations, alumni chapters and affinity groups to officially welcome the most recent graduating class to the UCLA Anderson alumni network. These events provide a platform for alumni to connect with their local network and gain access to valuable lifelong learning opportunities. In September and October 2018, Jill Baldauf (’81), associate dean of alumni relations and Mary Fleshood, director of international alumni initiatives, joined WWW events in Europe, where alumni enjoyed events in Lausanne, London, Paris and Madrid.

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Wednesday, September 5 – Wednesday, September 12, 2018, Czech Republic

40 students visit Vienna and Prague for the CGM’s Global Immersion course, “Doing Business in Central Europe,” led by Robert Zeithammer, associate professor of marketing

In early September, 40 students from UCLA Anderson’s fully employed MBA program visited Vienna and Prague for the in-country week of the CGM’s Global Immersion course focused on “Doing Business in Central Europe,” led by Robert Zeithammer, associate professor of marketing at UCLA Anderson and a native of the Czech Republic.

During the week in-country, students learned about the business challenges and opportunities in Austria and the Czech Republic – two neighboring countries in the heart of Europe. In addition to studying each country in isolation, a comparison of the two countries allowed students to examine the long-lasting effects of authoritarian central planning on economic development. Part of the same empire for almost 900 years, the two countries share much of their histories and cultures. In the second half of the 20th century, however, the Czech Republic was a satellite state controlled by the Soviet Union while Austria continued to be a free European state. Travelling from one capital to the other, the students crossed the now-invisible “Iron Curtain” to understand differences that persist to this day – more than 25 years after the collapse of the Soviet Union. Students visited various companies in an effort to compare and contrast companies in the same industry in the two neighboring countries. They also had an opportunity to meet and network with alumni in both cities too.

The week began in Vienna where the students heard from two alumni during a welcome dinner; Sharon Bryant (’14), CEO of Inteligand, a private life sciences company founded in 2003 in Vienna and Rainer Goeritz (’91), co-founder and investor, Digital Privacy GmbH, a tech start-up in Vienna. The inaugural company visit was a fascinating one. The group headed to Ludwig Reiter where they were given a tour of the production facilities and heard from Till Reiter, who serves as the CEO. The Ludwig Reiter shoe manufactory, established in Vienna in 1885, is a family-owned and run business which is now in its fourth generation. At the Austrian Chamber of Commerce (or WKO) which represents the interests of Austrian companies, students received an overview of Austria’s economy and business environment from a macro and micro perspective, and the country’s start-up ecosystem. At Erste Group Bank AG, founded in 1819 as the first Austrian savings bank, students learned about the bank’s business model and business activities from economist Zoltan Bakay and how in 1997, the Erste Group went public with a strategy to expand its retail business into Central and Eastern Europe. Today, it is one of the largest financial services providers in CEE. Students also learned about the characterization of the region, impact of communism and the economic stagnation that caused the falling, as well as areas where progress has been made and some of the challenges that remain, such as the need to reduce regional disparities, add higher value-added jobs and improve demography. Students enjoyed a visit to Julius Meinl, the ambassador of Viennese coffeehouse culture. Here, they were greeted by the owner, Thomas Meinl, who represents the fourth generation of the Meinl family running the business. They received a fascinating tour of the roasting plant and learned about the coffee production system, roasting process and packaging and the different type and quality of beans, Robusta and Arabica. Thomas Meinl spoke about the company’s history and business. The company is 155 years old and hence has been through a lot of history in Austria. He explained that much has changed over the years, including customers tastes and values as well as innovation in the coffee business. During their time in Vienna, students also visited Emakina CEE and through case study examples were able to better understand the cultural differences that impact marketing and advertising in the different regions. The Emakina Group is one the top three independent digital communication groups in Europe.

On both sides of the border students visited wineries, a growing and important industry in Central Europe. On the Austrian side, they visited the Mayer am Pfarrplatz winery, the epitome of Viennese Heurigen culture with a centuries-old tradition crafting the finest Viennese wines in Heiligenstadt since 1683. Students were given a tour of the winery to better understand and appreciate the wine-making process and then enjoyed some wine-tasting as “Beethoven Haus,” where it was understood that Beethoven wrote his Ninth Symphony. Ulrike Hager, managing director of the regional wine board Weinviertel presented some very interesting facts about the wine industry, including global and local production, world wine consumption and trends. She also addressed the export and import markets and the Austrian wine market specifically, including the structure of the market, production and consumption and the Austrian wine export boom. On Sunday, September 9, the transition day from Vienna to Prague, the group first visited the majestic Lednice Castle. After a traditional Moravian lunch, they headed to Sonberk, the architectural icon of Czech Republic’s winemaking. Sonberk, whose grapes are sustainably grown has won a number of competitions and awards for its wine, including from Decanter World Wine Awards. Dagmar Fialová, sales and marketing director guided the group on a tour of the vineyard. Loess soil, modest elevation and south to southeast exposure make ideal conditions for grape varieties such as Riesling, Sauvignon, Traminer, Pinot Gris, Chardonnay, Pálava which students had the opportunity to taste, enjoy and purchase.

In Prague, students visited Česká Spořitelna, the largest Czech bank and part of the Erste Group. Česká Spořitelna was established in 1825 and boasts the longest tradition among banks on the Czech market. Here, students were presented with a snapshot of the macroeconomic situation in the Czech Republic by the Bank’s economists who discussed the Czech banking sector and history of Česká Spořitelna as well as the risks and emerging trends in the sector. Czechs are beer lovers and so a visit to Prague would not be complete without learning about this important sector. At the Prague office of Plzensky Prazdroj, the leading producer and exporter of Czech beer, students learned about the company from Drahomira Mandikova, director of corporate affairs for central Europe. She described the history of Czech beer and the importance of Birell, the bestselling non-alcoholic beer in the Czech Republic that appeared on the market in 1992. She also addressed the topic of female leadership in a male-dominated industry. At Nestlé Cesko s. r. o., students heard from Lucie Presslová, brand manager of ORION Chocolate tablets and learned about operating a global brand in the Czech Republic: challenges faced and lessons learned. ORION is one hundred percent local with local R&D, local production and local people and Lucie discussed localness as a strong shopping motivation for the Czech consumer. At STRV, a software design, engineering and one-stop mobile app development company located in the “Silicon Beach” neighborhood of Prague, students were met by David Semerad, co-founder and CEO. He discussed his entrepreneurial path and also explained the history of the company, its structure and what the company does in terms of sustainability. During the week in Prague, students also learned about the Czech media landscape (online and print) from Pavlína Louženska at 2FRESH, a design, development and communications agency that develops digital products, apps, websites and campaigns. She discussed the challenges, such as old structures and political influence and the current trends in the sector. They also learned about the Czech film industry from Martin Palán, owner of Bontonfilm, the number 1 distributor of movies on DVD, Blu-ray and 4K Ultra HD for major Hollywood studios, independent studios and local productions in the Czech, Slovak and Hungarian markets. He provided a broad picture of how the media and entertainment industry in these markets works. UCLA Anderson FEMBA alumnus, Miron Ilincev (’16), engagement manager at McKinsey shared his thoughts on FEMBA’s five steps to a successful life and talked about his own career trajectory. He also addressed working in Europe vs. the U.S., the business climate in the Czech Republic and Central Europe and also touched on what Europe thinks about the United States. Miron joined the group later that evening for the closing dinner at Villa Richter - Piano Nobile, located by Prague Castle. Vasily Korovkin (’18), who had just graduated with his Ph.D. in economics and recently moved to Prague to start his tenure track as an assistant professor at the Center for Graduate Research and Education at Charles University (CERGE-EI) also joined the evening.

A visit to Central Europe would not be complete without experiencing local culture. In Vienna, students enjoyed a guided tour and discovered Vienna’s greatest sights and hidden gems including the Imperial Palace, Kohlmarkt Street and St. Stephens Cathedral. Some students enjoyed the Opera Carmen at Vienna’s beautiful State Opera House, visited Schonbrunn Palace or experienced a boat ride on the Danube River. Students also discovered the magical “city of a hundred spires” and enjoyed a walking tour of Prague’s fairy-tale small lanes to see the city’s major landmarks, including the Old Town Square and Wenceslas Square and walked across the Charles Bridge to visit Prague Castle where they enjoyed a spectacular view of the medieval Czech capital.

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Sunday, September 2 – Saturday, September 8, 2018, South Africa

40 students visit Johannesburg and Cape Town to meet with social entrepreneurs for the CGM’s Global Immersion course, “Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation in South Africa,” led by Gayle Northrop, lecturer of social entrepreneurship

During the first week of September, 40 students from UCLA Anderson’s fully employed and full-time MBA programs visited Johannesburg and Cape Town as part of the CGM’s Global Immersion course focused on “Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation in South Africa,” led by Gayle Northrop, a lecturer at UCLA Anderson and also adjunct faculty at the University of Cape Town’s Graduate School of Business.

During the one-week in-country, students had many opportunities to hear from and engage directly with social entrepreneurs in the country through site and accelerator visits as well as through interactive smaller group discussions. A reception was also organized in Johannesburg which provided further opportunities to network and connect with inspirational people who care about positive social change.

While in Johannesburg, students enjoyed a guided tour of Soweto and learned about the turbulent history and diversity of the people and culture in Kliptown – a township in Soweto. They also visited the Apartheid Museum and Mandela Exhibition celebrating the life and times of Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela. Students met with eKasi Entrepreneurs where they heard from its founder, Elvis Sekhaolelo. eKasi Entrepreneurs is a non-profit organization dedicated to shaping the state of townships and rural areas in Southern Africa through skills development, public-private collaborations, social innovation and access to markets. It helps township entrepreneurs to run their businesses by mentoring and equipping them with necessary business skills and training through the eKasi Entrepreneurs Academy. During the visit, students interacted with over 10 entrepreneurs to understand the challenges and struggles they faced with creating a business. Businesses ranged from a clothing brand company to a catering company. Students also mentored these entrepreneurs and had an opportunity to apply the business concepts and skills learned at UCLA Anderson in the functional areas of finance, marketing and organizational development to help provide guidance to the entrepreneurs on how to price services and brand their business. In Johannesburg, students also visited the Harambee Youth Employment Accelerator, a nonprofit social enterprise that helps unemployed youth find employment through training and partnerships. Here, the youth practiced mock interviews with the students who also had an opportunity to provide guidance and feedback. On Monday, September 3, students enjoyed an evening networking reception with social entrepreneurs, local business leaders and UCLA partners on the rooftop bar of Radisson Hotel Sandton with terrific views of Johannesburg. Nine guests joined the reception, including UCLA Anderson alumna Laura Parker (’13), executive director of the Boys & Girls Club of South Africa and Ross Beerman, CEO and co-founder of AllLife Insurance a life insurance company that offers affordable life insurance to people living with HIV of Type 1 or 2 diabetes which the students also visited. Alastair Van Heerden, Senior Research Specialist for the Human Sciences Research Council who has worked with two AMR teams and one GAP team and will be working with another AMR team this year also attended the reception.

Students then traveled to Cape Town, where they visited organizations such as Khayelitsha Cookies, a social enterprise with an aim to produce the best cookies in South Africa while empowering and hiring previously unemployed and disadvantaged women from Khayelitsha, a township community with a high unemployment rate and numerous related social problems. Here, students provided input on the organization’s marketing and sales strategy as well as feedback on its operations and production. They visited Red Bull Amaphiko, an international program aimed at giving wings to social entrepreneurs who are using their talents and creativity to make a difference in their communities. At RLabs, they heard from Marlon Parker founder and chief innovation officer. RLabs is a global movement and social enterprise that creates an environment for community driven innovation and reconstruction, empowering people to make a difference in the lives of others through skills and training, technology, social enterprise incubation and impact investing. Students also visited Pick n Pay, a major retailer in South Africa that strives to address socio-economic challenges through a supply of high-quality, affordable food for all customers, while providing significant employment and economic opportunities across its value chain. Later in the week, the group toured the Solution Space in Philippi Village, one of the largest townships in Cape Town. Philippi Village is an entrepreneurial development, that provides space where entrepreneurs and businesses can grow and where residents can develop skills and increase their employability.

Students also had the opportunity to visit Thokozani. Launched in 2003, Thokozani produces fine wines ethically. Here, they learned about the wine industry in South Africa and Thokozani’s central and crucial focus on training and development as an absolute necessity to the achievement of sustainable economic empowerment. During their time in South Africa, students also experienced local culture, visited key attractions and enjoyed some local cuisine. They enjoyed a scenic drive along the Cape Peninsula to Cape Point and the penguin colony at Boulders Beach, as well as ascended by cable car Cape Town’s famous peak, Table Mountain. The course was a unique, meaningful and impactful experience for students and was very eye-opening to see the progress that is being made in South Africa and how much is happening in the area of social innovation and social entrepreneurship and understand how they each can make an impact.

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Thursday, August 30, 2018, London, UK

Students Enjoy Lunch with CGM Founding Board Member, Toby Raymond (’86) While on Exchange at London Business School

During the summer, around 50 FEMBA and EMBA students participated in one-week exchanges at eight partner schools. A new exchange agreement with London Business School in the UK, provided an opportunity for seven students (2 EMBA and 5 FEMBA) to study at LBS in August/September during three one-week block sessions. Students took courses such as private equity and venture capital, strategies for growth, brand management, strategic innovation, and paths to power. On Thursday, August 30, Sophie Gao (FEMBA 2020), Martin Komal (EMBA 2019) and Cameron Pettey (FEMBA 2019) had an opportunity to enjoy lunch with CGM founding board member, Toby Raymond, managing director of Access Equity Management Ltd. who relocated to London in 1992 to work as a market maker in financial derivatives products, and established futures arbitrage and proprietary trading programs for an international trading firm. Raymond began advising on alternative asset investments in 1997 and established Access Equity Management Limited in 2000. The luncheon at The Windsor Castle provided a wonderful opportunity for our exceptional students to connect with and learn firsthand about European business and markets from a distinguished and accomplished global leader. They were also joined by London-based Matthew Daines, executive director of development in Europe for UCLA.

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Friday, August 24, 2018, Regent Singapore Hotel

UCLA Global Forum in Singapore: "Ahead of the Curve: From Traditional Education to Lifelong Learning" 

In August, UCLA Chancellor Gene Block and Vice Provost of Global Engagement, Cindy Fan visited the global Bruin family across Asia where they traveled to Bangkok, Manila, Jakarta and Singapore. On Friday, August 24, during their visit to Singapore, the UCLA Singapore Chapter, including alumni leaders Jennifer Loh (B.A. '98) and Chong Meng Lai ('05), pictured far left and center, welcomed Chancellor Block and Vice Provost Cindy Fan (second from left) to Singapore. The Chapter held a Global Forum with UCLA Anderson alumna and Center for Global Management founding board member, Hwee Hua Lim ('89) who delivered a presentation titled, "Ahead of the Curve: From Traditional Education to Lifelong Learning." In her presentation, she discussed the challenges of AI on employment, and the need for institutions of higher education to adapt to skillsets required of students in the future in order to equip them for their careers in the future. Over 100 alumni, new students and their parents attended the evening of discussion and networking. Hwee Hua Lim, pictured second from right together with husband Andy Lim ('89), is an executive director of Tembusu Partners and a senior advisor to KKR & Co. She is chairman of the Asia Pacific Exchange and an independent nonexecutive director of Jardine Cycle & Carriage Ltd., United Overseas Bank and BW Group. Lim was first elected to Parliament in December 1996 and served until May 2011. She last served as minister in the prime minister's office, Singapore, and concurrently as second minister for finance and transport. 

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Monday, August 20, 2018, UCLA Anderson

The CGM Hosts an Evening of Networking with Students from ESSEC Business School’s EMBA and Digital Leadership Programs and UCLA Anderson’s FEMBA, EMBA and UCLA-NUS EMBA Programs

The Center for Global Management welcomed over 50 students from the EMBA and Advanced Certificate in Digital Leadership programs at ESSEC Business School, France to UCLA Anderson from August 19-24, 2018 for a one-week global management seminar focused on “The Business of California.” The week provided participants with an opportunity to complete part of their studies at UCLA and gain valuable global experience and insights. Content focused on the innovation and creativity that are such an integral part of the business community in Los Angeles and California, including current academic research and business application around topics such entrepreneurship, technology and business model driven innovation and its impact on the global mobile industry, the proliferation of big data and its efficient intermediation, as well as idea generation and the fundraising process. During the week, students visited Amgen, Hatch Escapes, Disney Imagineering and Versus Systems. On Monday, August 20, the students enjoyed a networking reception on the North Terrace, organized by the CGM where they had an opportunity to interact with faculty teaching during the week as well as meet and connect with students from UCLA Anderson’s EMBA and FEMBA programs and from the UCLA-NUS EMBA Class of 2019 who were on campus for the first of their two week UCLA residencies.

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Friday August 17, 2018, 1:00 PM-2:00 PM, A-201, Collins Center

Global Management Lecture Series “Non-Market Risks: Geopolitical Realignment and U.S.-China Conflicts” with Christine Loh

The current “trade” conflict between the United States and China is really about geopolitics. There are also conflicts between the United States, its immediate neighbors and Europe who are traditional allies. A refashioning of the world order as we know it has begun. This reshaping will likely take decades and the process will be non-linear and unpredictable. These changes will affect other countries and their economies. Geopolitics and politics are non-market risks that cannot be ignored as they are impacting industries, investments and businesses. On Friday, August 17, the Center for Global Management joined the UCLA-NUS Executive MBA program in hosting Christine Loh, a leading voice in public policy in Hong Kong. During the lunchtime presentation and discussion, Loh addressed the deconstruction of geopolitical changes that are taking place to enable a deeper understanding of how managers may consider them in the longer-term in shaping their firms’ strategies. With many global examples, she discussed the importance of understanding, analyzing, mitigating and responding to non-market issues - political, economic, social and technological and the questions to ask when assessing non-market risks. The packed classroom included many international exchange students, as well as students from the UCLA-NUS EMBA and LA-based EMBA programs. Many global and diverse perspectives and insights were shared during an engaging Q&A session that followed. Professor Ed Leamer, Chauncey J. Medberry Professor of Management who will lead a group of over 50 EMBAs to Hong Kong and China in September for the EMBA International Business Residency also joined the discussion that addressed U.S.-China relations, including cross-border investment and trade. Christine Loh currently serves as chief development strategist at the Institute for the Environment at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and is the former Undersecretary for the Environment of the Hong Kong S.A.R. Government (2012-17). During AY 2017-18, she taught a new course at UCLA Anderson, titled “Understanding Politics: The Global Context for Doing Business.

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Sunday, August 12, 2018, UCLA Anderson

The CGM Welcomes International Exchange Students from 9 Partner Universities and Hosts an Evening of Networking with UCLA Anderson’s EMBA and FEMBA Students

Managed through the Center for Global Management, one-week exchanges conducive to working students’ schedules are offered over the summer with international partner universities. In 2018, over 50 FEMBA and EMBA students are scheduled to participate in one-week exchanges at nine partner schools during the summer and in December. On Sunday, August 12, the CGM welcomed around 30 students from these same nine partner schools who joined classes with UCLA Anderson’s EMBA and UCLA-NUS EMBA students during a one-week block of elective courses. The CGM hosted an orientation and networking reception for students to learn more about Los Angeles, UCLA and UCLA Anderson, as well as network with peers from other top international business and management schools. A tour of the beautiful UCLA campus was also provided. Students from UCLA Anderson’s EMBA and FEMBA programs, participating on exchange over the summer joined the networking reception. Many reconnected with students they had met earlier in the summer at their host institutions and also were introduced to new friends from schools they will soon be visiting on exchange. The one-week exchange block at UCLA Anderson coincided with the two-week UCLA residency for the UCLA-NUS EMBA program so there were tremendous opportunities for all students at UCLA Anderson to interact and network with peers from around the world during the week.

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Saturday, August 11 & Sunday, August 12, 2018, Korn Convocation Hall, UCLA Anderson

2018 Global Media Blockchain Summit – Los Angeles

The 2018 Global Media Blockchain Summit was hosted at UCLA Anderson’s Korn Convocation Hall – the first time that the Summit had been held in Los Angeles. Closely following the significant growth of blockchain technology globally and China’s most recent Five-Year Plan, emphasizing the importance of innovation and new technologies, the Summit connected the resources, knowledge, talent and expertise from the U.S. and China. The two-day conference brought together business leaders, technologists, blockchain start-ups, investment and marketing professionals from a variety of industries to build interconnection with the global blockchain community. UCLA Anderson alumni and FEMBA and EMBA students pursing the Global Management specialization and certificate engaged in dialogue to learn more about the most updated blockchain technology and related industry applications to better understand how this cutting-edge technology – which is already having a significant impact on the business community – can have a positive impact on daily lives globally. The conference included sessions focused on applications in media and entertainment, healthcare, real estate – key industries that drive the Californian economy. Saturday’s opening keynote address discussed the blockchain investment landscape and was delivered by Andrew Gu, founding partner, Danhua Capital. On Sunday, the keynote address on the current state of blockchain technology was delivered by Rahilla Zafar, Managing Director, ConsenSys. Key members of the organizing committee included two UCLA Anderson’s executive MBA class students Renee Xue and June Chu, who recently launched NUTOPIA, a start-up company with a focus on blockchain technology application in the entertainment industry. The Summit, which attracted around 500 attendees over the two days, was co-hosted by BIMG, NUTOPIA, IDEAS, LA Blockchain Lab and NOVA ONE.

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Saturday, July 28, 2018, Dickson Plaza, UCLA

The CGM Engages with FEMBA and EMBA Admits At Palooza 7

On Saturday, July 28, 2018, UCLA Anderson celebrated a tremendously successful Palooza 7 which attracted over 1,350 people. The seventh annual fun-filled family event, formerly known as FEMBApalooza, was hosted by the FEMBA and EMBA programs. It was held on UCLA’s Dickson Plaza and served as the official welcome event of the entering classes: FEMBA Class of 2021 and EMBA Class of 2020 and showcased the people, programs and available resources of UCLA Anderson.

The event brought together students and alumni from many of UCLA Anderson’s programs — the FTMBA, FEMBA, EMBA, UCLA-NUS EMBA, Ph.D., and MFE - and included members of the Classes of 1970, 1972, 1973 and over 225 incoming FEMBA, EMBA and FTMBA students from the recently admitted Classes of 2021 and 2020. Faculty, family and friends joined. The CGM conducted a “Learning on the Learn” mini TEDx-type session on the global opportunities at UCLA Anderson and shared information on the international programming available both on and off campus, including the global immersion and international exchange courses.

Alumnus Mark E. Lee from the FEMBA Class of 2017 joined CGM executive director Lucy Allard (’06) and talked about his engagement with the CGM, including participation in five global immersion courses, including as a teaching assistant for two courses that traveled to Japan, Thailand/Myanmar; as a CGM mentee; as well as his decision to pursue the specialization in global management. The CGM also managed a booth to showcase and highlight the global courses, programming and opportunities available to students. The grand prize for the afternoon was a Palooza global immersion fellowship, which covers the program fee for the in-country component of a global immersion course. It was won by Sam Ritchie, from the FEMBA Class of 2019. Over the years, through the global immersion and international exchange courses as well as GAP and SMR, FEMBA and EMBA students have traveled to over 45 countries.

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Thursday, July 19 & Friday, July 20, 2018, A201, Collins Center, UCLA Anderson School of Management

BIT Conference 2018: The Services Revolution – Industrialization, Experience and Technology

All major world economies are dominated by services in terms of economic value (GDP) as well as the share of employment and wages. Over the last few years, technological changes have impacted service sectors in dramatic ways, in terms of industrialization, productivity changes, new and innovative services, and the creation of novel types of experiences. The 2018 Business and Information Technologies (BIT) Conference that took place at UCLA Anderson on July 19 and 20 addressed the services revolution that is occurring. this two-day academic-industry conference explored changes occurring for services at both the company and sector level through a number of keynote addresses as well as panel discussions on sectors including finance, entertainment, healthcare and on user experience. The conference which attracted over 60 attendees, including UCLA Anderson current students and alumni, brought together industry and academic perspectives on the restructuring of sectors, major trends that are visible, further changes and disruptions that are likely to occur over the next decade, and also addressed implications for industries, firms, jobs and wages. Among the topics that academicians and industry leaders discussed over this two-day conference, included how technology driven industrialization and innovation will determine winners in the evolving competitive landscape for services and the strategies that are emerging to cope with such rapid change. They also addressed academic approaches to these issues, including the methods, frameworks and analytics that are being developed to support best practices. The conference was complimentary to MBA students to provide them with the opportunity to learn and network with academicians and industry executives. The conference was organized by Uday Karmarkar, the L.A. Times Chair in Technology and Strategy and founder of BIT; Vandana Mangal, co-director of BIT; Enzo Baglieri, associate professor in management practice of operations and technology at SDA Bocconi School of Management; and the UCLA Anderson Easton Technology Management Center. The conference was co-sponsored by the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management. The CGM provides research support to UCLA Anderson professors on topics related to global management issues, international relations, or issues of global/regional cooperation and has been supporting the BIT global research project for over six years. Founded at UCLA Anderson, the project is an ambitious multi-year, multi-country, multi-part business information technology project that addresses the introduction, adoption and implementation of new information and communication technologies in business practice at various levels. The global research partner network currently includes 21 leading research institutions from 17 countries.

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2018 - 2019

 
Thursday, May 16, 2019 5.00-8.00 p.m., North Terrace

2019 International Food Festival – Celebrating and Valuing Diversity while Taking Taste Buds on a World Tour!

On May 16, 2019, students from the International Business Association (IBA) organized UCLA Anderson’s largest food festival - International Food Festival 2019 (IFF-2019). This annual tradition, supported by the Center for Global Management, Office of Diversity, MBA Student Affairs and ASA showcases, celebrates and embraces the international culture and diversity of UCLA Anderson through a universal form of expression — food. The event was held on North Terrace in place of Anderson Afternoons and the beautiful ambience was spiced up as UCLA Anderson students from different countries gathered together to experience different cultures through cuisines from all over the world. Adding to the ambience were decorations, bright lights and miniature international mini flags. Stalls decorated with regional handiwork only added to the elegance of the event.

The celebration was attended by more than 280 students from across UCLA Anderson’s various degree programs, faculty and staff as well as friends and family. The event featured 12 different cuisines from India, China, Thailand, Israel, Korea, Vietnam, Indonesia, Japan, Europe, Cuba, Argentina and a fusion of Central Asia. Host students, representing different student clubs at UCLA Anderson from around the world, sourced authentic food from some of the best restaurants across Los Angeles. Some student hosts also dressed up in their country’s and/or region’s traditional attire and spent time conversing with attendees to explain the details of the food served such as special occasion when it is consumed and cooking ingredients and methods. While a collection of international beverages to pair with the food was provided by the AndersonEats and Southeast Asia Business Association, desserts from the European Business Association made the atmosphere a bit sweeter. Cultural diversity was also on display through international music and student hosts sharing facts and customs about their own countries.

The Critics’ Choice Award for the best tables was judged on the basis of providing the best cultural experience. The decision was a difficult one to make. The two winners selected by judges from the full-time MBA office, included the South Asian Business Association’s paneer and chicken tikka and the Greater China Business Association’s cold noodles. Further, the two People’s Choice awards for best hospitality and cuisine was awarded to the Jewish Business Students Association’s burekas and rugelach and the Korean Business Student Association’s fried chicken and spicy rice cake.

IBA is grateful to the Center for Global Management, the Office of Diversity, ASA and MA Student Affairs for supporting the event and ensuring that UCLA Anderson remains an open and inclusive environment that embraces, celebrates and values diversity. In addition to the IBA, participating student clubs included: South Asian Business Association, Japan America Business Association, Greater China Business Association, Korean Business Student Association, European Business Association, Southeast Asia Business Association, Jewish Business Student Association, Asian Management Business Association, Anderson Eats, Net Impact and AnderTech.

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Thursday, May 16, 2019 4:00-5:30pm, Bunche Hall, UCLA

“Patent Litigation Considerations for Chinese Companies” with Lisa Zang, Associate, Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati, P.C.

While in recent years, Chinese companies have enjoyed immense success in the technology arena, there has been an uptick in U.S. patent litigations against Chinese companies. Given the amount of business that Chinese companies conduct in the U.S., the likelihood of collecting a significant U.S. judgment (or settlement payment) has also increased. In light of these developments, it is important for Chinese companies to take measures to reduce their exposure to U.S. patent lawsuits and the associated burdens of litigation. This includes reviewing business practices to avoid inadvertently infringing U.S. patents. In addition, Chinese companies can apply a discovery strategy early in litigation that limits discovery to only U.S.-based activities. In so doing, companies can set the stage for early motions for summary judgment to foreclose the recovery of damages for foreign sales. On Thursday, May 16, Lisa Zang, an associate in Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati's Los Angeles office addressed an audience of UCLA students and faculty to discuss these as well as other considerations that affect Chinese companies. Following her presentation, Yunxiang Yan, director of the UCLA Center for Chinese Studies and Professor of Anthropology moderated a conversation around the topic and key issues. Zhang’s practice focuses on intellectual property litigation. She has handled all phases of patent litigation and represented clients in the biotech, communications, electronics, mobile, pharmaceutical, security, and software industries in patent infringement and trade secret matters. The event was organized by the UCLA Center for Chinese Studies and co-sponsored by the Center for Global Management.

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Wednesday, May 15, 2019, 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Dean’s Conference Room

Lunch Series with CGM Advisory Board Member Brent Nelson Smith (’86), Co-Founder and Managing Partner, LevelOne Capital Limited; Former Global Group Head of Corporate & Investment Banking DBS Bank Ltd. On “Global Investment Banking and Entrepreneurship.”

On Wednesday, May 15, 2019, the Center for Global Management hosted a luncheon with advisory board member and UCLA Anderson alumnus, Brent Smith (’86). A senior international manager, financial services executive, private investor and strategic advisor, Smith has over thirty years of experience across Asia, the U.S. and Australia and now regularly commutes between the U.S. and Southeast Asia. Since 2008, he has served as co-founder and managing partner of LevelOne Capital Ltd., a pan-Asian investment and advisory firm where he has specialized in startup and mezzanine opportunities in emerging markets with a focus on southeast Asia, particularly Vietnam and Singapore. Smith formerly served as managing director and global group head of corporate and investment banking for DBS Bank, a Singaporean multinational bank and financial services company after spending almost 15 years with JPMorgan & Co., where he was a managing director in the investment banking and mergers and acquisitions groups, and completed assignments in New York, Melbourne, Sydney, Singapore and San Francisco. First, second and third year students from the full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs, including past and present CGM mentees, members of the Investment Finance Association, Entrepreneur Association and Southeast Asian Business Association and students interested in global management gathered to hear his career trajectory since graduating from UCLA Anderson in 1986. The luncheon provided an opportunity for interested MBA students to meet Smith in an informal and interactive setting and hear his thoughts, insights and experiences as a global investment banker, investor, entrepreneur and strategic advisor. He discussed his career trajectory since graduating from UCLA Anderson as well and his experience living, working and doing business internationally, and the importance of global and diverse perspectives, cultural sensitivity and fluency and international experiences in today’s environment. He shared many personal stories and experiences with the students as well as lessons learned throughout his successful global career, providing valuable guidance to students and describing his transition from investment banker to CFO to venture capitalist to entrepreneur. Smith discussed the importance of peer to peer networking, being open to opportunities and opening yourself up to your network. He explained how past experiences and skills acquired in the early days of his career have helped him understand different industries in different countries as well as comprehend various management structures which have all been valuable both in his entrepreneurial ventures today as well as in his role as a board director. He also touched on the importance of looking, listening, learning and self analyzing. The lunch was supported by the Investment Finance Association, the Entrepreneur Association and Southeast Asian Business Association.

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Thursday, May 9, 2019, 4:30 PM, Anderson Afternoon, North Terrace

Celebrating Israeli Independence Day at UCLA Anderson

The Jewish Business Student Association (JBSA), with support from the Center for Global Management and Anderson Student Council, organized an Israeli-themed Anderson Afternoon on Thursday, May 9 to celebrate Israel’s Independence Day. Independence Day commemorates the Israeli Declaration of Independence on May 14, 1948, making this year the 71st anniversary of the establishment of a Jewish state in the land of Israel. JBSA’s mission is to build and sustain a community that enhances the professional, social and educational experience of Jewish students at UCLA Anderson. Given the significant interest among UCLA Anderson students in learning more about Israel, as demonstrated by the participation in the annual Israel trek, the JBSA wanted to share more about Israel’s unique history and culture and make it accessible to the wider UCLA Anderson community. Students enjoyed Israeli food and music, while students who participated on the Israel trek shared their recent experiences in Israel with other students who were interested in learning more about the history of the country and the importance of Independence Day.

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Friday, May 3, 2019 8:30AM – 4:30PM

The Future of the Automobile Conference: Driving Towards Tomorrow, Petersen Automotive Museum

Long a center of car culture, Los Angeles is emerging as the epicenter of new transportation development. The world is watching closely to see how we redesign our urban landscape around new electric, autonomous and ridesharing technologies. California will play a key role in creating the hardware and the software and establishing the regulatory framework that will underlie a dramatic shift in the transportation industry extending across America and around the world. On Friday, May 3, the Los Angeles World Affairs Council and Petersen Automotive Museum hosted the second Future of the Automobile Conference – Driving Towards Tomorrow at the Petersen Automotive Museum in west Los Angeles to explore the impact of evolving design, rideshare, and technology in the automotive industry with the most forward-thinking automotive leaders and designers who shared their visions of the future. The conference brought together leading voices from car manufacturers, technology companies and regulatory agencies for a day-long series of talks and panel discussions on one of the biggest technological, economic and social changes facing the U.S. and the world in the coming years and provided a glimpse into the future of our mobility and explored the brave new world of the personal transportation revolution that is set to transform every city in the world. As a member of the LAWAC, the Center for Global Management supported 14 students from the full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs to attend the day-long conference which opened with a discussion around “Visions of Tomorrow.” In this inaugural session, respected thought leaders from the automotive and technology industries, academia, and public policy shared their perspectives on the myriad of challenges and opportunities for the future of the automobile. This was followed by a keynote address on “Designing the Future” with Klaus Bischoff, VW’s head of design who since 2007, has been responsible for global design for the Volkswagen brand. There were morning breakout sessions on topics such as self-driving cars and inter-vehicle communication, connectivity and security; the future of infrastructure and city planning; the future of ownership and ridesharing; and artificial intelligence and autonomy. The mid-day keynote was delivered by McKeel Hagerty, CEO of Hagerty around the topic of “Human driving in the autonomous future.” Hagerty’s knowledge and enthusiasm have given him a reputation as an authority within the automotive and automotive media worlds, representing the classic car community on numerous boards and advisory groups, Afternoon breakout sessions explored the powering of the future and modern advances in electric vehicles; human-computer interfaces, design, and the driving experience; the industry future and manufacturing transition; and rising China: Competition or cooperation in future automotive technology. The birth of the car was a product of innovation in a core set of advanced industrialized countries. More than a century later, a new revolution in automotive design is taking place against a setting of globalized industries and technologies. New market entrants, such as China, are seeking to be leaders in the new era of autonomous automobiles. This panel explored whether the question as to whether international competition will rule the day, or whether countries will learn to cooperate in the establishment of standards and the sharing of technologies?

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Monday, April 29, 2019 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM, Executive Dining Room, UCLA Anderson

World Today Discussion Series “U.S.-China Conflict and the Case of Huawei: Business, Policy and Legal Issues and Implications”

Huawei is the world's No. 1 telecommunications equipment maker, despite being effectively shut out of the U.S. market. The company has spent decades building a strong presence in markets around the world and last year, overtook Apple as the second biggest supplier of smartphones. The detention in Canada of Huawei’s CFO for extradition to the U.S. caused major concerns in international business, particularly among companies and executives in the telecoms and technology sectors. Huawei's rise as a global tech company is under threat as an increasing number of governments express concern that its technology could provide a back-door for the Chinese authorities. The assault on Huawei's business reflects the increasingly bitter rivalry between Beijing and Washington over who will control the technologies of the future. There is particular concern about the security of 5G because it will be used to carry vast amounts of data, connecting robots, autonomous vehicles and other sensitive devices. On Monday, April 29, the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management hosted a discussion over dinner with technology and legal experts who explored the business, policy and legal issues surrounding the Huawei case, and also provided lessons for future global leaders in the audience. The discussion was moderated by Christine Loh, a visiting professor at UCLA Anderson who teaches a course on non-market risks, a lawyer by training and also a former government minister in Hong Kong. Panelists included UCLA alumnus, Craig Ehrlich (B.A. ’78), chair of the Center for Global Management and former chairman of the GSMA — the world’s largest trade association for the mobile industry, whose business and investing career has focused on the mobile and technology sectors; and two experienced lawyers who have had to deal with some of the types of issues that the case raises: Gary Lincenberg, a principal at Bird, Marella, Boxer, Wolpert, Nessim, Drooks, Lincenberg & Rhow, P.C. and Jason Linder, a partner with Irell & Manella LLP. The discussion addressed the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, U.S. trade sanctions, cyber-based national security issues and how these have accelerated as well as how U.S. law might be used. The possible wider implications and scenarios that could evolve from these positions and how the cost and timing of 5G rollout might also be influenced were also addressed. The event engaged over 100 students and faculty from UCLA Anderson, UCLA School of Law and UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs in a fascinating discussion around this very complex case. The World Today Discussion Series engages students in dialogue in an interactive, engaging and enriching discussion format around current global issues that transcend borders. Through the series, the CGM engages globally minded students with issues that matter and ideas that stimulate. Through balanced discourse, the series serves as a neutral forum to educate students on global issues while at the same time encourage debate and examination. 

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Monday, April 22, 2019, 7.00-9.00pm Wolfgang Puck, UCLA Ackerman Union

UCLA Anderson Latin American Business Association (LABA) Organizes Mixer for LABA Students to Network with LABA Alumni, Living and Working in Los Angeles

On Monday, April 22, LABA leaders organized an evening of networking and camaraderie at the Wolfgang Puck restaurant located in the heart of the UCLA campus. The 2019 LABA Alumni Mixer, organized by LABA and sponsored by the Center for Global Management and Anderson Student Association, gathered together around 15 first and second year full-time MBA students and members of the UCLA Anderson Latin-American alumni community who live and work in the greater Los Angeles area. This is the second year that the CGM has supported LABA to promote this event that seeks foster a bond that goes beyond the two or three years that students spend at UCLA Anderson and promote lifelong connections and friendships to assist with networking, recruiting and increasing school engagement.

This year, alumni who work at companies such as Boeing, Mattel, Riot Games, Safra, Sony Pictures and 7 Bridges LATAM attended the mixer. The evening provided a terrific forum for students to learn more from alumni about the companies as employers, possible recruiting opportunities as well as life after the MBA. Professor Gonzalo Freixes, associate dean of the FEMBA and EMBA programs, originally from Cuba and a strong supporter of many LABA initiatives, attended and engaged in conversations with students and alumni. The event also provided an opportunity for alumni to familiarize themselves with both the CGM and LABA-led programming such as the Latin American Business Conference and various speaker series and panel discussions. It also reinforced the commitment of “Sharing Success” between alumni and the younger generations, promoting collaboration and potentially generating future partnerships and business opportunities too. We are delighted to see this event becoming an annual tradition for bringing together current and former LABA members!

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Friday, April 19, 2019, 11:30 AM - 7:30 PM, UCLA Anderson School of Management

2019 Wilbur K. Woo Greater China Business Conference: A Dialogue Across the Pacific

On Friday, April 19, 2019, the Center for Global Management hosted the 13 th annual  Wilbur K. Woo Greater China Business Conference at the UCLA Anderson School of Management. The 2019 Conference, titled, "A Dialogue Across the Pacific," brought together successful U.S. and Chinese leaders, investors and influencers from a variety of industries and sectors who shared their perspectives on the changing dynamics of U.S.-China relations and the implications and future of the U.S.-Sino relationship.

Speakers, including UCLA and UCLA Anderson alumni and faculty members addressed an audience of over 300 attendees from the UCLA as well as business, investment and governmental communities. Discussion focused on new and creative investment strategies and partnerships as well as the importance of collaboration that embraces cooperation, stimulates innovation, drives sustainable economic growth and facilitates cross-border growth and expansion. Speakers also provided an analysis of the current state and future outlook of the two largest economies in the world and addressed the importance of innovation, collaboration and new technology. 

Following a lunchtime career panel discussion for UCLA students with UCLA and UCLA Anderson alumni, the conference was officially opened by UCLA Anderson's Interim Dean and Faculty Director of the Price Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation. Alfred E. Osborne Jr.; Michael Woo, Los Angeles' first Asian-American city councilman, son of conference founder Wilbur K. Woo (B.A. '42) and dean of Cal Poly Pomona College of Environmental Design; and Pin Tai, CEO and president of Cathay Bancorp and Cathay Bank, a platinum sponsor of the 2019 conference. This was followed by the keynote address, delivered by Zak Dychtwald, founder and CEO of the Young China Group and a macro overview and business perspective delivered by William Yu, economist with the UCLA Anderson Forecast and Chan Fong, partner at PwC, also a platinum sponsor of the 2019 conference. 

Plenary and concurrent sessions throughout the afternoon focused on U.S.-China relations and the opportunities and implications for cross-border business and investment, Chinese millennials and the emerging middle class, and the implications and opportunities for business. A range of other topics also were addressed, including: technological innovation and the importance of collaboration in advanced technologies, scientific advancements and R&D; improving people's wellbeing and the opportunities in health care, elder care, housing, education and environmental protection; and investment financing, entrepreneurship and growth strategies resulting from cross-border investment. The evening before the conference, the Center for Global Management hosted a private dinner for the speakers, moderators, student conference directors and sponsors in the executive dining room. Following the conference, a networking event was held in the same room which provided wonderful opportunities for the audience and speakers to continue conversations.

The conference featured speakers from American Wonder Porcelain, Ampaire Inc., Applied StemCell Inc., Cathay Bank, Consulate General of P.R. China in Los Angeles, Elavare Global Advisors, Global Win Capital Corporation, Google, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, HowardSchultz.com, Hylink USA, Johnson & Johnson, Landsea Homes, Maschoff Brennan, PwC, RAND Corporation, RedBridge Capital LLC, The Blueshirt Group, University of California Office of the President, USC Gould School of Law, Young China Group and the UCLA Anderson School of Management.

"Amid today's international economic tensions, it is critically important to understand the implications and future of China-U.S. economic policy for anyone involved in cross-border transactions in the Pacific Rim," says Jerry Nickelsburg, UCLA Anderson adjunct professor of economics and UCLA Anderson Forecast director and senior economist, who served as the moderator for the panel on U.S.-China relations." The continuing dialogue of the Wilbur K. Woo Greater China Business Conference provides a valuable forum for deepening our understanding." Born in China in 1916, the late Wilbur K. Woo (B.A. '42) received his bachelor's degree in business administration from UCLA. Wilbur K. Woo, vice chairman emeritus of Cathay Bank and Cathay Bancorp, was known for his decades of leadership in the Chinese-American community. Together with his wife, Beth, they endowed the Wilbur K. Woo Greater China Business Conference at UCLA Anderson with the goal of promoting understanding of the economic ties between the Greater China region and United States. They established the conference to show gratitude for the training Wilbur received at his alma mater many years ago. 

The 2019 Wilbur K. Woo Greater China Business Conference was organized by the Center for Global Management at the UCLA Anderson School of Management, in association with UCLA Anderson's Greater China Business Association (GCBA) and UCLA's Chinese Students and Scholars Association (CSSA). It was sponsored by PwC and Cathay Bank at the platinum level. Landsea Homes and Cox Castle Nicholson were silver and bronze sponsors, respectively. The China General Chamber of Commerce - Los Angeles, Los Angeles World Affairs Council, UCLA Asia Pacific Center and UCLA Center for Chinese Studies were supporting organizations. 

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Monday, April 15 through Thursday, April 18, 2019

7th UCLA Annual Latin American, LatinX and Iberian Film Festival: Women's Voices

The UCLA Latin American and Iberian Film Festival was founded in 2012 and has been running annually ever since. The Festival has been very effective in promoting recent Latin American and Iberian cinema, not only among the academic world, but also in the Los Angeles community at large. Working with more than twenty departments, centers and organizations, the 2019 festival, organized by the UCLA Department of Spanish and Portuguese raised funds to organize a multi-day festival that ran from Monday, April 15 through Thursday, April 18.

The 7th Annual Latin American, Latinx, and Iberian Film Festival: Women's Voices celebrated women filmmakers and featured screenings of twelve films produced and/or directed by female directors from Brazil, Chile, Dominican Republic, Mexico, Spain, and the United States. This was the first year that films made in the U.S. by Latinx filmmakers were included as part of the festival, with the aim to acknowledge and share the traditions, history and language of the Luso-Hispanic community around the world. 

The screenings took place at various venues on the UCLA campus, from the James Bridges Theater to the presentation room at the Charles E. Young Research Library. All screenings were followed by a Q&A session with the film directors as well as professors from various departments on campus. The opening night at the James Bridge Theater included a screening of "Real Women Have Curves" (United States, 2002), followed by a Q&A with the film's director, Patricia Cardoso, moderated by graduate student Gabriela Barrios. The festival concluded with a screening of "As Boas Maneiras" (Brazil, 2017), directed by Juliana Rojas and Marco Dutra and was followed by a Q&A with Juliana Rojas, moderated by graduate student Michelle Medrado and visiting professor Eliane Robert Moraes.  All screenings were preceded by a reception, featuring food from Spain and Mexico. 

On Thursday, April 18, following the screening of Cielo de Agua, Professor Sebastian Edwards moderated a panel discussion with Chilean filmmakers, Eugenia Poseck and Margarita Poseck. The panel also included Professor Verónica Cortínez, professor in the UCLA Department of Spanish and Portuguese and director of the UCLA Center for Southern Cone Studies. The panel discussed the book Fértil provincia y señalada: Raúl Ruiz y el campo del cine chileno, edited by Professor Cortínez. During the discussion, the panelists also talked about Poseck´s feature film Heaven (Cielo de Agua, Chile, 2018) which was screened at the festival two nights before and the short film Tide (Marea, Chile, 2007) that was screened on Thursday, April 18.  

The 2019 Latin American, Latinx and Iberian Film Festival: Women's Voices was organized and presented by the UCLA Department of Spanish and Portuguese and sponsored by various units on campus, including the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management, Latin American Institute, Center for Southern Cone Studies, Department of Gender Studies and the LGBTQ Studies Program, among others. The screenings were free and open to the public.

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Wednesday, April 10, 2019, 12:15 PM – 1:30 PM, UCLA School of Law

"Law and Macroeconomics: Legal Remedies to Recessions" with Yair Listokin, Professor of Law, Yale Law School

In his new book, Law and Macroeconomics: Legal Remedies to Recessions, Yair Listokin, Shibley Family Fund Professor of Law at Yale Law School proposes that we take seriously law’s ability to function as a macroeconomic tool, capable of stimulating demand when needed and relieving demand when it threatens to overheat economies. He argues that law, of all things, has the potential to rescue us from the next economic crisis. Listokin makes his case by looking at both positive and cautionary examples, going back to the New Deal and including the Keystone Pipeline, the constitutionally fraught bond-buying program unveiled by the European Central Bank at the nadir of the Eurozone crisis, the ongoing Greek crisis, and the experience of U.S. price controls in the 1970s. History has taught us that law is an unwieldy instrument of macroeconomic policy, but Listokin argues that under certain conditions it offers a vital alternative to the monetary and fiscal policy tools that stretch the legitimacy of technocratic central banks near their breaking point while leaving the rest of us waiting and wallowing. During a lunchtime presentation on Wednesday, April 10, 2019 in front of a packed room of students and faculty from both the UCLA School of Law and Anderson School of Management, Listokin discussed his new book which was then followed by a moderated Q&A with UCLA Professor of Law, Jason Oh. Listokin has been honored with a Milton Friedman Fellowship from the Becker-Friedman Institute at the University of Chicago and has served as a Visiting Professor at Columbia Law School, Harvard Law School, and New York University School of Law. His research has been featured in the Wall Street Journal, Fortune, cnn.com, Boston Globe, and Slate. The event was organized by the Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy and sponsored by the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management.

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Tuesday, April 9, 2019, 6:30 PM - 8:30 PM, Korn Convocation Hall

Film Screening of “Better Angels,” A feature documentary film on the U.S.-China relationship, followed by Moderated Discussion with Film’s Producers

During the evening of Tuesday, April 9 and in advance of UCLA’s 2019 Wilbur K. Woo Greater China Business Conference, the Center for Global Management in collaboration with the Los Angeles World Affairs Council hosted a film screening of Better Angels, a feature documentary on the U.S.-China relationship. The screening attracted an audience of over 100 students, alumni and members of the Los Angeles community who gathered in Korn Convocation Hall to watch the screening Better Angels, which was produced over five years, shot on four continents, and created with the participation of three U.S. Secretaries of State. The documentary captures compelling stories that highlight the global stakes, challenges and opportunities of the world’s most important bilateral relationship. At a time when the world’s two acknowledged superpowers seem to be moving closer towards economic and political conflict, this feature documentary by two-time Academy Award®–winning director Malcolm Clarke explores how the destiny of both countries became so deeply and inextricably intertwined. By examining the day-to-day lives of ordinary Chinese and American citizens this feature-length documentary asks: Can the United States survive the rise of China? Is confrontation inevitable? Or, by rediscovering our Better Angels, can we find a way to grow beyond our mutual suspicions and misperceptions, to create a stable and prosperous alliance that could benefit the entire world? Following the screening, Professor Min Zhou, Walter and Shirley Wang Endowed Chair in U.S.-China Relations & Communications, and Director of the UCLA Asia Pacific Center moderated a conversation with William A. Mundell and David Dreier, the film’s producer and co-executive producer, respectively who were later flying to Beijing where Better Angels would serve as the opening documentary at the 2019 Beijing Film Festival. The event was organized by the Center for Global Management, in collaboration with the Los Angeles World Affairs Council. Screening sponsors included the UCLA’s Asia Pacific Center, Center for Chinese Studies and Burkle Center for International Relations as well as UCLA Anderson’s Greater China Business Association and UCLA’s Chinese Students and Scholars Association.

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Sunday, March 24 – Saturday, March 30, 2019

39 students visit Shenzhen and Hong Kong as part of the CGM’s global immersion course, “A Technology Driven Transformation of Society, Enterprises and Consumers,” led by Terry Kramer, adjunct professor and faculty director, Easton Technology Management Center

In March, over spring break, 39 students from UCLA Anderson’s full-time, fully employed, executive and UCLA-NUS executive MBA programs visited Shenzhen and Hong Kong for the in-country week of the CGM’s global immersion course, “A Technology Driven Transformation of Society, Enterprises and Consumers,” led by Terry Kramer, adjunct professor and faculty director of the Easton Technology Management Center. At UCLA Anderson, Professor Kramer also teaches the foundational technology management course that covers the impact of disruptive innovation on products, services, markets and competition, and another course on the evolution and innovation in the mobile communications industry and promising areas of innovation.

A notable transformation is occurring in Hong Kong and the surrounding region of Shenzhen. This technology driven transformation has been enabled by Government policy, changes in consumer preferences and enterprise driven innovation. During the course, students learned a great deal about and experienced firsthand the transformation in the region and for China and Hong Kong more broadly in areas such fintech, high-tech smart manufacturing and internet services, specifically drawing upon contextual leadership—identifying the “cause and effect” of the successes in the region and the likely future outcomes and areas of innovation.

During the week in-country, students heard from many prominent business and technology leaders, founders and CEOs, academics as well as successful entrepreneurs. They also met with and had the opportunity to hear from successful and influential UCLA and UCLA Anderson alumni and saw firsthand the power, influence and connections of the UCLA brand and network in China and Hong Kong. A number of fireside chats, panel discussions and several conversations helped illuminate the region’s political, economic, and innovation-oriented environment, and the significant changes that have occurred over the last several decades. Students visited companies and heard from executives across several sectors which demonstrated the transformation in the region and for China more broadly in areas such fintech, high-tech smart manufacturing, social media and internet services. Visits such as Tencent/WeChat, Foxconn, DJI, Mindray and Royole, as well as other emerging artificial intelligence and fintech companies were important in telling the story.

In Shenzhen, the inaugural speakers on the first day provided terrific context and foundation. First, students heard from Joe Rocha, managing director of Greenpro Capital Corporation, who also serves as the governor of the South China AmCham and has been a key member of the South China business community for over ten years. His presentation looked at the China of today and tomorrow and its transformation of society through new technologies. He provided an excellent overview of the Chinese economy and discussed the specific areas of technology based innovation that he felt have the greatest promise. He also addressed the opportunities for Chinese companies to expand globally and in turn for U.S. companies to expand into China. Derek Haoyang Li, a serial entrepreneur, founder and CEO of Yixue Squirrel AI Learning, who has been recognized as one of the “Top 30 AI-Entrepreneurs in China” then addressed the artificial intelligence solution in education and the unique challenges and opportunities that Chinese companies have in AI vs. other nations. Squirrel AI Learning is an edtech company that educates children through artificial intelligence and helps children to advance learning through a real-time adaptive system and cultivate good learning habits with practice.

The first visit of the week was to HAX Shenzhen, located in the well-known electronics market area of Shenzhen. HAX, which started in 2012 is the first and most prolific full-stack hardware accelerator, with over 270 companies launched in the past five years. The students also visited Mindray. Founded in 1991, Mindray has adopted advanced technologies and is today one of the leading global providers of medical devices. The company’s mission is “to advance medical technologies to make healthcare more accessible.” Mindray is dedicated to innovation in the fields of patient monitoring and life support, in-vitro diagnostics, and medical imaging. Students had an opportunity to hear from its CEO, Cheng Minghe about the unique Chinese context and the areas of innovation that the company is involved in. Students also visited Foxconn to learn about its autonomous vehicle initiative, smart farming and enterprise supply chain management platform. A visit to DJI (Da-Jiang Innovations Science and Technology), the world’s largest drone-maker provided an opportunity for students to learn more about its range of products including unmanned aerial vehicles, flying platforms, flight controllers for multi-rotors and ground stations. Students also vised Royole, a tech unicorn that was founded by Stanford engineering graduates in 2012 whose mission is to improve the way people interact with and perceive their world. The company creates and manufactures next-generation human-machine interface technologies and products including advanced flexible displays, flexible sensors, and smart devices – some of which the students had the opportunity to test out. In an entrepreneurial lab set up at Bee+ Technology’s impressive co-working space in Nanshan, students learned about the tech startup scene and heard from four different local tech entrepreneurs and their respective businesses ranging from virtual reality to manufacturing to the IoT and blockchain. The entrepreneurs they discussed the feasibility of their current projects and particular challenges they are facing. Student also heard from Kent Zaitlik, CEO and founder of MOZI.AI and learned about the application of AI in biomedicine and the AI-based play in healthcare.

A highlight of the week was the visit to Tencent’s headquarters and a tour of its Exhibition Hall. Here, students learned more about Tencent’s story, the company’s evolution and its remarkable innovations, including Tencent Games; WeChat; Tencent Pictures; e-Sports; its smart retail where you can pay by face recognition using the WeChat wallet; Tencent AI lab and its AI medical innovation too. Nan Wang, a director in Tencent’s strategy development department addressed the group. She touched on many areas, including how Tencent maximizes user engagement on its platforms and explained that maximizing user engagement remains the core of Internet competition. She talked about the Internet-led digital transformation that is being seen across all fields i.e. commerce, transportation, healthcare, food and beverage as well as finance and suggested that Internet companies are driving technological innovations. Tencent is transforming itself from a 2C (consumer) company to a 2B (business) company. She addressed Tencent’s strategy and also its strategic partnerships which enrich Tencent’s ecosystem and empowers partners in key verticals. This visit and discussion was a very memorable and invaluable part of the students in-country global immersion experience.

In Shenzhen, Edison Song (B.A. ’12), president of the UCLA South China Alumni Association arranged a UCLA alumni gathering at the rooftop bar of the Grand Hyatt Hotel. In addition to a number of UCLA Anderson students from the course, there were also a number of UCLA and UCLA Anderson alumni in attendance who either resided in Shenzhen, were passing through on business or who made the trip from Hong Kong. Everyone enjoyed a nice evening of networking.

After three days in Shenzhen, the group traveled to Hong Kong. The inaugural visit was to EMQ. Launched in 2014, EMQ offers cross-border remittance (money transfer) services between two countries at a fraction of the price of conventional banks. Max Liu, EMQ’s co-founder and CEO explained how fragmented Asia is with different regulations, different settlement systems and different currencies and explained how he wanted to build an alternative settlement network. He gave a very insightful presentation with an illumination of the market and market structure, competitive environment, and EMQ's positioning and most importantly, the impact of “digital.” We later heard from Professor KC Chan, former Secretary for Financial Services and the Treasury of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region and adjunct professor of finance at HKUST. Since July 2018, he has also served as a senior advisor for WeLab. Founded in 2013 in Hong Kong, WeLab is reinventing traditional financial services by creating seamless mobile lending experiences. He talked about the strategy, business model and related successes of WeLab as well as the disruption and innovations that have taken place in the financial markets. Professor Chan also provided his unique perspective on Hong Kong’s fintech ecosystem at the intersection of government and academia. Elinor Leung, managing director of the regional telecom and internet team at CLSA, one of Asia’s leading capital markets and investment groups shared extremely informative insights on Internet services, China and global trade related issues. She has been covering the Internet giants since they first listed. Her research covers areas such as e-payments, finance, entertainment and the cloud.

On the Thursday evening, UCLA Anderson alumni as well as recently admitted students gathered at the Mira Hotel in Tsim Sha Tsui on Nathan Road for an alumni panel discussion and networking reception. Around 16 guests attended. Professor Kramer moderated a conversation with UCLA Anderson alumni Fritz Demopoulos (’97), founder of Queen’s Road Capital; Long (Alex) Shang Ying (B.S. ’92; ‘01), managing partner of Rivendell Partners; and Leland Sun (’86), founder and managing director of Pan Asian Mortgage Company. Alumni talked about their career trajectory post-Anderson and shared their thoughts and insights on the technology driven transformation of society, enterprises and consumers from their personal as well as own industry perspective. They did an excellent job describing both the macro and micro investment environment in China which really helped students better understand both the opportunities and challenges of innovation in the region. Everyone then enjoyed an evening of networking in the hotel’s Vibes Garden. The panel discussion was very well received and the networking reception was a tremendous success. It was wonderful to see so many alumni and students networking together and the significant strength and influence of the UCLA Anderson network in Hong Kong.

During their time in Hong Kong, students traveled by metro and on foot to experience the city the way locals travel. On the last day, the group traveled by MTR to The Hub co-working space and were able to compare and contrast the co-working space in Hong Kong with what they had visited in Shenzhen. Daniel Puzny, founder of the International Blockchain Lab which works with new technologies, focused on blockchain, addressed blockchains in Asia, bitcoin and cryptocurrencies and explained that blockchain as a digital registry is designed to disrupt multiple verticals, including digital currency, health and real estate. The final speaker of the week, Renu Bhatia, co-founder of Asia Fintech Angels and an advisor to FintechHK, addressed the fintech ecosystem in Hong Kong. The breath of her comments covering China, Hong Kong, India and the U.S. were high impact and her focus on fintech innovation all contextualized with her leadership learnings and approaches were invaluable. Students learned a lot about the region, innovation and decision-making from her. This was a terrific session to conclude the week.

On the last day or the course, some students enjoyed a very pleasant afternoon getaway from the hustle and bustle of the city and traveled to the beautiful Lantau Island to visit the Giant Buddha and Po Lin Monastery. Others enjoyed emblematic views from the top of Victoria Peak, explored the luxurious residential area of Repulse Bay and also visited Aberdeen Fishing Village, a picturesque floating harbor with seafood markets and floating restaurants. During the week, students had many opportunities to enjoy some of China’s culinary delights, including the famous Peking duck at 1949, on the roof top of the famous Happy Coast Shopping mall in the Nanshan District and then at the end of the week, they enjoyed some local Cantonese cuisine at NanHai No. 1 on Nathan Road with a great view of the harbor and city. On the Saturday, some enjoyed Art Basel to explore Asia’s international art scene, others took in more sights of Hong Kong while other students departed home or headed to other parts of Asia. This first technology-focused global immersion course helped students to understand the dynamic growth of Shenzhen juxtaposed against the historic prosperity of Hong Kong. And in the process of understanding these two fascinating success stories, the course uncovered the "cause-and-effect" relationship of government policy and the changes in consumer preferences and technology in driving unique outcomes. Students thoroughly enjoyed their time and experience in Shenzhen and Hong Kong – they learned a great deal about and experienced firsthand the transformation in the region and for China and Hong Kong more broadly in areas such fintech, high-tech smart manufacturing and internet services; they were inspired; met good friends; and had a truly immersive experience together.

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Sunday, March 24 – Saturday, March 30, 2019

40 students travel to Bogota and Medellin, for the CGM’s global immersion course to learn about “The Transformation of Colombia and Its Economy,” with Gonzalo Freixes, associate dean of the FEMBA and EMBA programs

During the same week of winter break, 40 students from UCLA Anderson’s full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs traveled together to Bogota and Medellin for the in-country week of the CGM’s global immersion course, “The Transformation of Colombia and Its Economy: From Plomo to Plata,” led by Gonzalo Freixes, adjunct professor and associate dean of the fully employed and executive MBA programs. This was the second time that the CGM visited Colombia for one of its courses and the first time that Medellin was included in the itinerary.

A lot has changed in Colombia over the last few decades. After years of violence and political instability, the country has transformed itself into one of Latin America’s leading economies. The government has made substantial progress in tackling the country’s illegal drug trafficking and reaching a settlement with revolutionary elements that have impeded the country’s growth and stability. At the same time, Colombia has experienced economic growth and prosperity as it has embraced a free trade economy. While many problems remain and economic growth has been stagnant in the region, Colombia has transformed itself into something of a Latin American success story. Foreign investment into the country and the growth of key domestic industries has made Colombia one of the best places in Latin America to do business. The second global immersion course to focus on Colombia provided students with a general overview of the country and its economy, as well as key insights and a deeper understanding of how Colombia managed this transformation and what it has meant for doing business in the country. The in-country portion of the course looked at some of the major industries and sectors in Colombia and immersed students in Colombian business and social culture.

The inaugural sessions took place in Bogota on Saint Joseph’s Day, a public holiday in Colombia, also referred to as “Dia del Hombre.” The opening speakers provided excellent context and a helpful framework for the week. First, Colombian journalist, John Otis provided a terrific overview of the many historical and cultural challenges facing the country. This was then followed by a presentation and discussion with UCLA Anderson alumnus, Andres Giraldo (’09), a principal at The Boston Consulting Group, who was joined by Wenyi Cai, managing partner of Polymath Ventures. In addition to talking about his time as a student at UCLA Anderson, Giraldo focused his presentation on the retail sector and highlighted several of the larger companies that operate throughout all of Latin America. Cai talked about Polymath Ventures, a digital venture group focused on innovating in sectors that are currently experiencing technological disruption. Cai believes these new technological solutions will be significantly different in emerging market segments, e.g. mobility, employment and health and wellness. Later, two UCLA Anderson alumni brothers, Igal Jinich (’95) and Zeev Jinich (’90) talked about their company Ciplas SAS, a third-generation family-owned and operated plastics manufacturing business in Colombia. Ciplas is a leading company in the transformation and commercialization of products made with polypropylene. The company’s product portfolio includes sacks and bags, canvases and tents, ropes and mesh packaging for sectors such as agro-industrial, petrochemical, mining and textiles. The brothers discussed the challenges of doing business in Colombia, the legal and tax frameworks, the labor laws and also the business opportunities that the country presents. The brothers each spoke about what led them to UCLA Anderson and ultimately to the business that they both now manage. Students were honored to have the opportunity to meet such successful and influential alumni living and working in the country.

Students also had the opportunity to learn about the flower sector through a visit to Bicco Farms, located on the rural outskirts of Bogota which produces and exports award-winning fresh cut flowers. Here, students heard from the farm’s general manager Mauricio Bonivento, who addressed the production process and the business of flower growers in Colombia. Bonivento discussed the challenges around the seasonal nature of the industry and how national and international holidays often dictate the color of flowers most desired by retail customers. Students enjoyed a guided tour of the nursery and greenhouse where the flowers are grown, the factory where the flowers are harvested, and the cold storage/refrigeration locations where the flowers are ultimately processed and packaged for distribution.

In 2011 UNESCO declared the "Coffee Cultural Landscape" of Colombia, a World Heritage site so a visit to Colombia would not be complete without learning more about Colombia’s important coffee sector. FEDECAFE, the National Federation of Coffee Growers of Colombia was founded in 1927 as a business association that promotes production and exportation of Colombian coffee. It currently represents over 540,000 producers, most of whom are small family owned farms. Maricela Aguinaga Arcon, a research economist for the Coffee Growers Federation, addressed the implementation of the public policies in place to support Columbia’s coffee trade, and discussed the retail landscape associated with coffee both in Colombia and around the world. Arcon further discussed the Federation’s role in the coffee trade, including quality control, market positioning, purchase guarantees and its contributions to the infrastructure of the country through development and construction in previously rural portions of the country.

In Bogota, students also learned about the challenges and opportunities of the real estate industry in the country from Margarita Llorente, the general secretary of Amarilo, a leader in the promotion, management, sale and construction of housing projects. Santiago Alvarez, CEO of LatAm Airlines, the second largest air carrier in Colombia addressed the company’s strategy and also competition in the airline industry. Alvarez explained that the challenges of the industry necessitate the company to generate creative solutions to drive revenue and growth. Lastly, in Bogota, the group visited the National Police Department of Intelligence to hear more about the political and economic situation in Colombia and the progress that the country has made over the last three decades from Diego Fernando Vallejo Garcia, professor of the Universidad de los Andes. Two high-ranking members of the Colombian National Police, General Gustavo Alberto Moreno Maldonado and Brigadier General Ramiro Alberto Riveros Arevalo both discussed the role of the National police in the region, the security challenges they face while highlighting Colombia’s commitment to security to ensure that it remains a stable and safe place for economic development.

Students then traveled to Medellin. The position of Medellín as the second industrial city in Colombia has been a main factor in overcoming its crises of the 1980s and 1990s. In February 2013, the Urban Land Institute chose Medellín as the most innovative city in the world due to its recent advances in politics, education and social development. Medellín also won the Lee Kuan Yew World City Prize 2016 which recognizes and celebrates efforts in furthering innovation in urban solutions and sustainable urban development.

During the first day in Medellin, students visited Ruta N, a technology incubator that develops various programs and services to facilitate the economic development of the city towards businesses in science, technology and innovation, in an inclusive and sustainable way. The objective of RutaN is to create an ecosystem for social and innovative change designed around talent, financial capital, legal and technological infrastructure and proper networking. At Ruta N several technology entrepreneurs shared their stories and discussed their various companies and projects including Vitalbox, a medical records platform and Red_Medellin, a company with aims to both create cheap, ubiquitous access to broadband internet for underserved communities and to give formerly unbanked individuals a way to transact digitally.

At Bancolombia, Camilo Velasquez, the bank’s director of innovation explained some of the challenges of being a regional bank in a country which has significant variability in population centers and geographical challenges, requiring Bancolombia to be nimble and investor focused. Students also learned about the fintech revolution that is taking place globally. Bancolombia has also been recognized for its sustainability focus and Andres Perilla, a sustainability analyst spoke to some of the sustainable business practices that Bancolombia seeks to finance in an effort to cater to the millennial generation. He explained that Bancolombia focuses its investment strategy on companies that seek out sustainable practices through energy efficiency, use of renewable energy and cleaner production of existing energy sources.

In Medellin, students also visited Globant to hear how the company generates value and positively impacts its community. Globant is a leading IT and software development company that seeks to connect users with brands using digital and cognitive technologies and methodologies to enhance the customer experience.

The students also attended a presentation at Sura, one of Colombia’s largest healthcare providers. At Sura, students learned about the current state of the healthcare system in Colombia, including the differences between Colombia’s private versus public health insurance systems, and experienced some of the technological solutions that Sura is integrating into Colombia’s evolving healthcare system.

The final presentation of the week was delivered by UCLA Anderson alumnus Juan Chusan (B.S. ’88, ’96), president of Retail Food at Nutresa, a leading food-processing conglomerate headquartered in Medellín. Nutresa’s principal activities are producing, distributing, and selling cold cuts, biscuits, chocolates, coffee, ice cream and pasta. In addition to sharing his own personal and inspiring story where he described coming from South America to UCLA Anderson, Chusan also described Nutresa’s business philosophy of treating each of its brands as a business unit, allowing each to serve as a natural hedge against the others. Chusan shared some valuable lessons related to the expansion of a multinational company into new markets including considerations of not just the size of a market, but also the logistics associated with managing a company in a foreign country.

After learning about the coffee sector earlier in the week from FEDECAFE, a visit to Colombia would not be complete without a visit to an actual coffee farm. At Capilla del Rosario, overlooking the Medellin Valley, the group received a tour of the coffee plantation and learned about the process of how coffee beans are grown, harvested, peeled, fermented, dried, and ultimately packaged and sold. In addition to learning about the chemistry and science behind the brewing of coffee, the students were treated to a Columbian coffee tasting as well.

To conclude the week, the group witnessed firsthand the transformation and innovation of the city with a tour of Comuna 13. This neighborhood has among the most tumultuous histories in the city and was once labeled the most dangerous neighborhood in the world. In the 1980s-’90s, the neighborhood was controlled by groups loyal to Pablo Escobar, the notorious drug lord who lived in Medellín. Students learned how the community has reinvented itself into a place of optimism becoming a livable, vibrant, and growing community. The focal point of the tour to Comuna 13 was the area around the outdoor escalators that provides access to homes in marginalized barrios that were formerly isolated from the city. Today, this transformed neighborhood is home to a colorful celebration of arts and culture, featuring street art and performances in several different parts of the neighborhood. Art saved the city as a vehicle for creative and political expression. The walls became a canvas to tell its history, beautifying the area and bringing optimism and peace to the residents, children, and visitors. Experiencing the life and color to the people in this community and seeing their potential for the future was an inspiring way to conclude the in-country week.

During the week, students also experienced local culture, visited key sites of important historical significance and enjoyed local cuisine and nightlife. In Bogota, they enjoyed a city tour and visited sites such as the historic square of Chorro de Quevedo, and the Botero Museum, which houses one of Latin America's most important international art collections. In Bogota, they also visited the Anthony Bourdain-featured restaurant, Tabula with great tapas, as well as Abasto, a nice, cozy and casual Latin bistro. The students enjoyed the opening dinner at the casual popular eatery Andres DC in Bogota. They were joined by UCLA Anderson alumni brothers Igal Jinich (’95) and Zeev Jinich (’90). In Medellin, the farewell dinner took place at Carmen Medellin, an enchanting space with a cozy yet hip vibe situated inside a house in the Poblado neighborhood. Here students enjoyed contemporary cuisine, inspired by Colombian ingredients and flavors that are creatively woven into modern dishes that express the country’s biodiversity. The dinner served as a wonderful end to a very productive and meaningful cultural experience. After the conclusion of the week, some students headed to explore the historic port city of Cartagena on Colombia’s Caribbean coast, while others traveled back home to the United States to start back at school or work.

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Sunday, March 24 – Saturday, March 30, 2019

40 students travel to Tokyo, for the CGM’s global immersion course to understand more about “The Business Environment and Opportunities in Japan,” with Mariko Sakakibara, professor of strategy

During the same week of spring break, 40 students from UCLA Anderson’s full-time, fully employed, executive and UCLA-NUS executive MBA programs traveled together to Tokyo for the in-country week of the CGM’s global immersion course, “The Business Environment and Opportunities in Japan,” led by Mariko Sakakibara, professor of strategy. This was the fourth time that a global immersion course had visited Japan and the third time that Professor Sakakibara had led the course.

After achieving spectacular economic growth from the 1950s to the 1980s, Japan has struggled with a prolonged recession in recent years. Its competitive position has been threatened by its Asian competitors. Japan’s aging population threatens its future growth. However, Japan remains the third largest economy in the world, and maintains its strong technological and cultural base. Japan-originated innovation has been commercialized and sold around the world, new businesses have been created and many business opportunities remain untapped. This course familiarized students with Japan’s business environment and helped students to identify business opportunities. Students gained a better understanding of the effects of Japanese systems on the way business is conducted in Japan and also explored business opportunities for both foreign and domestic companies and how to take advantage of these opportunities.

In Tokyo, the inaugural session was delivered by Terrie Lloyd, CEO of both Japan Travel, a leading resource for Japan travel information and Metroworks, a software technology company. He provided an overview of the business landscape in Japan and discussed the opportunities for U.S. companies. Lloyd also shared some insights into doing business in the country as a foreigner and addressed the Japanese mindset and cultural nuances that are important to understand. Dave Versteeg, CFO of Starbucks Japan then explained the history of Starbucks Japan, which was established in October 1995 as a joint venture between Sazaby League and Starbucks Coffee International. His presentation focused on how to become successful in the Japanese market. He compared and contrasted Japan’s business environment with that of the United States and explained how Japanese consumers are different to American consumers and that they are very influenced by the new and different, which is why Starbucks Japan has to create a new menu item every few weeks. Japanese consumers also typically stay in the coffee shop to drink coffee and are less inclined to grab and go therefore the location and space itself is highly valued by the consumer. Versteeg explained how Starbucks has to adapt to the Japanese consumer and implement different techniques in order to be a strong player in Japan’s coffee market.

The first company visit of the week was to the headquarters of Amazon Japan where the group was greeted by UCLA Anderson alumnus Shea Simpson (’11), head of licensing and label relations for Amazon Music Japan. Students heard from different Amazon businesses and learned how U.S. multinationals adapt to the Japanese consumer. Dan Callies, director of devices for Amazon Japan and Misako Furuya, head of Echo for Amazon Japan talked about the struggles of Echo in Japan and the challenges they currently face. Simpson provided an overview of the music industry in Japan and the struggles of getting Japan on board with streaming music. Mizue Arakawa, director of Amazon Fresh/Prime Now, Japan addressed the company’s experience with launching Fresh and Prime Now in Japan and explained some of the nuances and unique characteristics of the Japanese market as well as the needs and expectations of the Japanese consumer. During a visit to Terumo, founded in 1921 and the first company to produce medical thermometers in Japan, students learned about the healthcare industry in the country and in particular, the challenges and opportunities of Japan’s aging population. Since Terumo’s humble beginnings, the company has expanded into a medical device manufacturing giant, producing medical disposables, cardiovascular systems and diabetes care products.

Students also had the opportunity to visit, Fabbit, a co-working space and through an interactive panel discussion with local and expat entrepreneurs, were able to better understand Japan’s start-up scene, new government initiatives and funding opportunities as well as fundraising challenges. Panelists included Jordan Fisher, CEO and co-founder of Zehitomo, an Internet platform that connects customers and local services in Japan; Akira Kurabayashi, managing director, Draper Nexus Venture Partners, an early stage venture capital firm based in Silicon Valley and Tokyo that invests in B2B startups; Shirabe Ogino, CEO, Zaisan.net, a user-friendly service that makes it easier for the general public to understand financial markets and make the right investment and asset management decisions; and Yuki Kishi, fintech director at Plug and Play, a global innovation platform that has built accelerator programs, corporate innovation services, and in-house VC to expedite the progress of technological advancement.

At Nissan, students enjoyed a tour of its Oppama plant, one of the country’s largest plants where gasoline and electric-powered vehicles are built, to understand and see firsthand Japan’s cutting-edge manufacturing in action and the latest in car technology. The Oppama plant became the first in Japan to use robots on the production line when it introduced welding robots in 1970. The second part of the visit included a visit to Nissan’s Yokohama headquarters to learn about the company’s corporate strategy, new customer trends as well as challenges ahead for the car industry. They also heard from Yuta Yamazaki, manager, global brand strategy about the companies’ global sales strategy, Nissan Intelligent Mobility, electric vehicle and autonomous driving innovations and visited Nissan’s showroom to see its latest products. A visit to Costco Japan, the membership warehouse club was fascinating for the group. Costco opened its first Japan location in 1999 and since then has grown its presence to 26 stores across the country. The Japanese arm of the business is a wholly owned subsidiary of Costco U.S. Howard Tulk, vice president and director of operations, provided a brief introduction of Costco as well as the history and story of entering the Japanese market. Students learned that while Costco Japan stocks several U.S. brands and Costco private-label products, there are some big differences between the shopping experience in both countries. Because Costco is so unique, Japanese customers look at Costco more like a family trip. Costco Japan also sells some unique items for the Japanese consumer such as fresh sushi platters, different flavored kitkat bars, and Japanese whiskey and beer. The group had the opportunity to explore the Costco warehouse store and make some purchases using their Costco card.

Students were thrilled to have the opportunity to visit DeNA. Established in Tokyo in 1999 as a small start-up with the launch of an online auction service, DeNA has continuously expanded its business portfolio. Today, the company develops and operates a broad range of mobile and online services including games, e-commerce and entertainment content distribution and is a provider of mobile portal and e-commerce websites in Japan. It also owns the Mobage platform, one of the most popular cell phone platforms in Japan. After receiving a brief introduction on the company and hearing about the story and evolution of DeNA, students had the opportunity to hear from the company’s founder, Tomoko Namba who shared her own personal career journey and discussed entrepreneurship in Japan, venture capital in the country and explained some of the challenges to the entrepreneurial mindset in Japan.

During the final visit of the week to NEC, a Japanese multinational provider of IT services and products, students learned about the company’s business strategy and technology development for both domestic and global markets. Founded in 1899, NEC was the first Japanese company to form a joint venture with a foreign company (Western Electric) producing telephones and switches. Currently, NEC is the biggest PC vendor in the country and an important player in the global semiconductor market. Students also learned that NEC is the global leader in the field of biometric authentication and experienced the NEC Future Creation Hub which showcases technologies that the company has developed but are not yet available to the public. Here, business designers, data scientists, technology evangelists and other innovators team up with NEC’s global clients to jointly develop programs that generate social value for the next generation.

To conclude the week, UCLA Anderson alumnus David Nichols ('92), deputy president, representative director and chief administrative officer of State Street Trust & Banking Co. Ltd. discussed the business environment and opportunities in Japan from an investor’s viewpoint. He also talked about his own experience doing business in Japan and shared some key learnings including assimilation into the Japanese culture and negotiating techniques. In the late afternoon, alumni gathered together in Roppongi for an alumni panel discussion, which was later followed by a networking reception. Recently admitted students were also invited to join. Around 20 guests attended. Professor Sakakibara moderated a conversation with UCLA and UCLA alumni who shared their views on the business environment in Japan from their own personal experiences. Panelists included Vic Murai (’62), special advisor, Ichiryu Associates and former chairman, Compaq; Tomohiro Tohyama (LLM '84), co-founding partner of TMI Associates and president of the UCLA Japan Alumni Association; Ken Shibusawa ('87), president and CEO at Commons Asset Management, Inc.; and Riki Kojima (’92), chief of staff, Group CCO at Mitsubishi International Corporation and chairman of the UCLA Anderson Alumni Network Japan. Students also learned about the UCLA Japan Center in Tokyo and how the Japanese UCLA Alumni Association has helped contribute to its establishment. Panelists also addressed the many questions from students on the business climate in the country from what they had seen and experienced during their time in Japan. Topics centered around the hierarchal structure, women in the workforce as well as how Japanese companies are attracting talent. The panel discussion was very well received and the networking reception that followed at the Cedar Chop House and Bar in Roppongi was a terrific success. It was wonderful to see so many alumni and students networking together and the significant strength and influence of the UCLA /Anderson brand and network in Japan.

Students thoroughly enjoyed their time and experience in Japan. The cherry blossoms were in full bloom and the city was beautiful. In addition to the business visits and discussions, students also enjoyed the sites of Tokyo to better understand its culture and history. They visited the ancient Buddhist Asakusa Kannon Temple, Tokyo’s oldest temple and one of its most significant. After exploring the busy Asakusa, they relaxed on a boat down the Sumida River to the beautiful Hamarikyu Gardens where they could explore the gardens and enjoy refreshments at a traditional teahouse. During the week, students also enjoyed local traditional culinary delights. At Shabuzen restaurant, they tasted Japan’s iconic sake and the famous shabu-shabu. Some also enjoyed a foodie tour to experience the sights, sounds and most importantly the tastes of Tokyo that most visitors to not get to experience and explored the districts of Yurakucho, Ginza and Shimbashi. Early one morning, some students visited the fish market and enjoyed fresh slices of sashimi for breakfast. The group also visited Kamakura, a seaside city just south of Tokyo. The political center of medieval Japan, modern-day Kamakura is a prominent resort town with dozens of Buddhist Zen temples and Shinto shrines. Students also successfully navigated the Tokyo Metro, the city’s rapid transit system too.

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Tuesday, March 12, 2019, 5:00 - 7:00 PM, A-202, Collins Center, UCLA Anderson

The Sustainable State: The Future of Government, Economy and Society - A Book Talk with Chandran Nair

Chandran Nair is the author of The Sustainable State: The Future of Government, Economy and Society and founder and CEO of the Global Institute for Tomorrow, an independent Pan-Asian think tank. On Tuesday, March 12, 2019 UCLA welcomed Nair to campus for an afternoon discussion on his provocative book which argues that the West's market-driven model is not scalable and that development must be directed by a state that is willing and able to intervene in the economy. Corporations need to be directed towards meeting societal needs or otherwise restrained, not unleashed. For Nair, the path towards a sustainable future, especially in the large developing nations of the world, in which everyone's basic needs-and thus rights-are met is achievable only if the institutions of the state are strong and not prone to capture by vested interested. Following his presentation, Min Zhou, director of the UCLA Asia Pacific Center, professor of sociology and Asian American studies, and Walter & Shirley Wang Chair in U.S.-China Relations and Communications moderated a discussion with Nair, a regular speaker at global forums, including the World Economic Forum. The event was co-organized by the Asia Society Southern California and UCLA Asia Pacific Center and sponsored by the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management.

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Friday, March 1, 2019 1:00 - 6:00 PM, Korn Convocation Hall

2019 Latin American Business Conference: A ROAD MAP FOR LATIN AMERICA'S FUTURE

On Friday, March 1, prominent and influential leaders from both the private and public sectors, including UCLA Anderson alumni, gathered together in front of an audience of around 300 students, alumni, academics and members of the local business community in Korn Convocation Hall to address the opportunities and concerns of the region. In addition to sharing their experiences, insights and forecasts on the economic, political and social prospects for the region, they discussed the business and investment opportunities for Latin America and the region's important and influential role in the global economy. The conference was centered on actions necessary to develop and benefit from the opportunities that will allow the region to flourish and become a relevant and influential player on the world's stage.

Opening remarks were provided by Jose Gomez, a candidate of the full-time MBA Class of 2019 and co-president of the Latin American Business Association andAlfred E. Osborne, Jr., interim dean, professor and faculty director of UCLA Anderson Price Center for Entrepreneurship & Innovation. These were followed by a macro-economic overview of the region by Professor Sebastian Edwards, Henry Ford II Chair in international Management and faculty director of the Center for Global Management, an organizer and the lead sponsor of the conference. The keynote address was delivered by Sergio Fajardo, former Mayor of Medellín and former Governor of the State of Antioquia, Colombia which was followed by a moderated conversation with Sebastian Edwards. The conference focused on efforts underway to encourage new developments and advancements as Latin America prepares for a brighter future. Discussions examined the region's economic, trade, political and social prospects, with panels discussing the ways that the region must leverage its position in the world to foster sustainable growth and become a welcoming place for trade and investment, as well as an environment that encourages good governance and workforce development and education. 

Panelists included: Philip Behn, Senior Vice President of e-Commerce, Walmart de México y Centroamérica; Carlos Bremer,  chairman and CEO of Value Grupo Financiero; João Campos,  CEO pf  PepsiCo Foods Brazil; Agustín Caso Raphael, Mexico's deputy general auditor and professor of economics at ITAM; Eduardo Elejalde, founding partner of Latin America Enterprise Fund Managers (LAEFM) LLC and president of LAEFM Colombia Ltda.; Gerardo Grajales, chief transformation officer and executive vice president of Avianca Holdings S.A.; Juan M. Procaccini ('01), managing partner and former CEO of Argentina Investment and Trade Promotion Agency; Joana Monteiro, research coordinator in Rio de Janerio's  Prosecutor's Office and  former head of Rio de Janerio's Institute of Public Security;  Kevin Terraciano,  professor of History and director of UCLA Latin American Institute.

Discussions were moderated by: Sebastian Edwards; Gonzalo Freixes, adjunct professor of Accounting, Business Law, Taxation and International Business and associate dean of UCLA Anderson's Fully Employed and Executive MBA Programs; Felipe Cusnir ('13), CEO of Swell Capital Inc. and former director of International Trade & Investment with the Los Angeles Mayor's office; and Alfred E. Osborne, Jr. Before the conference, Sebastian Edwards and the Center for Global Management hosted a private luncheon for the speakers, moderators and student conference directors in the Dean's Conference Room. Following the conference, a networking event was held which provided wonderful opportunities for the audience and speakers to continue conversations. 

The event was organized by UCLA Anderson's Center for Global Management, UCLA Anderson's Latin American Business Association and UCLA's Latino Business Student Association, in collaboration with the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce. Conference sponsors included City National Bank (bronze level) and the UCLA Latin American Institute. 

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Tuesday, February 26, 2019, 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM, UCLA Faculty Center

Global Business and Policy Forum "Artificial Intelligence: Key Opportunities and Challenges"

Artificial intelligence will have a transformative societal impact in the coming years. While there is plenty that AI cannot do, it is perhaps the only technology in recent memory that, despite all the hype, will actually turn out to have been underhyped once its impacts are fully appreciated.  On Tuesday, February 26, the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management and  UCLA School of Law's Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy hosted  John Villasenor, UCLA professor of public policy and management and member of the World Economic Forum's Global Agenda Council on Cybersecurity for a very engaging discussion on what AI actually is, why it has become such a focus of attention and investment, and the resulting opportunities and challenges in relation to ethics, geopolitics, the labor market, combating bias, and regulation. During his presentation, Villasenor also addressed the intersection of technology, policy, law and business and broader impacts of key technology trends.  Villasenor is a professor of electrical engineering, public policy, and management, and a visiting professor of law. He is also a nonresident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and a visiting fellow at the Hoover Institution at Stanford. His work considers the broader impacts of key technology trends, including advances in digital communications, the increasing complexity of today's networks and systems, and the growth of AI. Over dinner, there were many interactive table conversations where specific questions were discussed among the students, including whether it is acceptable to use AI-based systems to make sentencing or parole recommendations? Relatedly, whether people impacted by those decisions have the right to know the details of the underlying algorithms? Students were also asked to comment on the best way to maximize the likelihood that, when faced with decisions with ethical implications, AI systems will make the "right" choice? While some people believe that new AI regulation is necessary. Others argue that new AI regulation would have few benefits and would also stifle innovation. Students were asked to discuss their thoughts on his too.  The discussion engaged around 70 students and faculty from the UCLA Anderson School of Management and the UCLA School of Law. The Global Business and Policy Forum is a collaborative partnership between UCLA Anderson's Center for Global Management and the UCLA School of Law's Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy.

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Thursday, February 21, 2019, 12:00 PM, California Club, Los Angeles

Reducing Civilian Casualties in War Roundtable Discussion with Randall Bagwell, Director of International Humanitarian Law, American Red Cross

Some reports indicate that in recent conflicts 90% of the casualties have been civilians. During a Los Angeles World Affairs Council lunchtime roundtable discussion at the California Club on Thursday, February 26, Randall Bagwell, director of international humanitarian law at the Red Cross discussed the place of international humanitarian law (IHL) within the context of conflict and war, and how IHL leaders are trying to reduce civilian casualties. He addressed the work being done to provide greater safety to protected classes, including children, journalists, and asylum seekers and also discussed how IHL is responding to new warfare such as cyber attacks, armed drones, and robots.  Bagwell spoke about the rising numbers of civilians being harmed in current conflicts due to the non-international nature of many conflicts, such as the conflict between the U.S. and IS. Fighters are also not distinguishing themselves from civilians and remain in populated villages, endangering everyone around them. Most nations haven't ratified additional protocols surrounding these types of conflict, which "makes it increasingly difficult to determine which laws apply to these conflicts and leaves room for governments to take advantage of the gaps." Colonel (Retired) Randall Bagwell joined the American Red Cross after more than thirty years of service as a Judge Advocate General (JAG) Officer in the U.S. Army. As a legal advisor for the Army, Bagwell performed duties ranging from prosecuting and defending criminal cases to advising on administrative and regulatory matters. However, his specialty, and the majority of his assignments, were in International Humanitarian Law (IHL). He has also instructed on IHL with partner nations in over 20 countries. As a member of the LAWAC, the Center for Global Management supports attendance of UCLA Anderson students to LAWAC discussions and events.

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Monday, February 11, 2019, 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM

Global Management Lecture Series "The Globotics Upheaval: Globalization, Robotics and the Future of Work" with Richard Baldwin, Professor of International Economics, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva

On Monday, February 11, Richard Baldwin, Professor of International Economics, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva and editor-in-chief, VoxEU.org, joined the Center for Global Management and Professor Sebastian Edwards, Henry Ford II Chair in International Management for a conversation and moderated discussion on his new book, which Lawrence Summers, former U.S. Treasury Secretary described as "the best book yet on the new economic era we are entering. Any worker, company or government who doesn't want to be left behind should read and consider his arguments." In his book, The Globotics Upheaval, published in February 2019, Richard Baldwin, one of the world's leading thinkers on globalization, argues that "globots" will build a better future, but will create explosive social challenges along the way. Baldwin address a packed classroom of UCLA Anderson MBA, Ph.D. students and faculty and talked about how digital technology is allowing "white-collar robots" to displace many service-sector workers and professionals while at the same time enabling "telemigration" where talented, low-cost workers sitting abroad displace domestic office workers. If displaced office workers join with already displaced factory workers, the result could be a destabilizing upheaval. To avoid this, Baldwin asserts that governments must use the tools they have to slow the pace and make the competition from globots seem fairer.  In his presentation, he concluded that "globotics" is coming faster than most think, in ways that few expect and that it will create a better world of work if the transition is managed. He suggested that mismatched speed is the main problem. Richard Baldwin is Professor of International Economics at the Graduate Institute, Geneva, founder and editor-in-chief of the policy portal VoxEU.org, and associate member of Nuffield College, University of Oxford. In addition to his research and teaching, he advises governments and international organizations around the world on globalization and trade policy issues. In 1990-91, he served as a senior staff economist for President George Bush's Council of Economic Advisors. The event was co-sponsored by the UCLA Burkle Center for International Relations

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Saturday, February 9, 2019, 8:30 AM - 1:30 PM, Geffen Hall, David Geffen School of Medicine

The 23rd Annual Health Care Symposium Immigration and Healthcare: Status, Access and Bridging the Disparity

With over 12 million individuals nationwide and nearly 2.4 million within California, the undocumented immigrant population is an undeniable segment of our nation's makeup. Still, an undocumented immigrant's access to healthcare systems is limited and often nonexistent, leading to poorer outcomes and diminished population health. With a shifting political climate, society must begin to reckon with the impact of legislation on the health and outcomes of its most vulnerable populations. On Saturday, February 9, 2019, the 23rd Annual Health Care Symposium Immigration and Healthcare: Status, Access and Bridging the Disparity explored the relationship between immigration and the healthcare system, and addressed how the healthcare system can use social justice as a means to improve access to healthcare for immigrants in the United States. The Symposium that brought together around 100 students, physicians, administrators, public health leaders, and members of the local community in Geffen Hall at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, helped to increase awareness about immigration as a public health issue and encourage discussion on the importance of working together to end barriers to health care access and towards finding solutions to the health care disparities. The annual Symposium has served for two decades as an educational and invaluable forum to core medical school curriculum and highlighted crucial yet diverse topics of great importance in modern health care.

This year's Symposium presented different perspectives on immigration ranging from legal to public policy to local community efforts. The opening plenary session, "Immigration Law and Policy in the Trump Administration: Immigrants at Risk?" was delivered by Hiroshi Motomura JD, Susan Westerberg Prager Distinguished Professor of Law, UCLA School of Law, an influential scholar and teacher of immigration and citizenship. The closing keynote, "Immigration, Health, and Social Justice" was delivered by Richard L. Seidman MD, MPH, Chief Medical Officer, L.A Care Health Plan who is responsible for developing and implementing strategies and initiatives to ensure quality health care delivery to the more than two million members - some of the most vulnerable in the county. Breakout sessions focused on "Fighting Persecution: The Role of the Physician in Immigration and Asylum" and "Linking State Policies to Immigrant Health." 

The Health Care Symposium is an annual conference organized by students at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA for their fellow students, the broader UCLA community, and the general public, with the intent of exploring a topic of importance to modern healthcare. The Symposium is an expression of interest and excitement on the part of medical students who believe that students of all levels can be valuable contributors to the conversations that are reshaping our healthcare system and, consequently, our health. The purpose of the Symposium is to involve UCLA students in these conversations, giving them the opportunity to learn from and interact with national leaders in healthcare and related fields. The UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management was a sponsor of the Symposium, together with various cross-campus units including UCLA Health, the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior, the Fielding School of Public Health and the UCLA International Institute, among others.

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Thursday, February 7, 2019, Anderson Afternoon, North Terrace

Celebrating Lunar New Year at UCLA Anderson

To celebrate the Year of the Pig, promote familiarity with and understanding of the Asian culture, and to strengthen cross club collaboration, on Thursday, February 7, 2019, the Center for Global Management supported the Greater China Business Association (GCBA), Asian Management Student Association (AMSA) and Korean Business Student Association (KBSA) to celebrate the Lunar New Year. The Lunar New Year is one of the most important holidays in Greater China, Korea, and Southeast Asia. During Anderson Afternoon on the North Terrace, the three clubs took this opportunity to bring the UCLA Anderson community together to celebrate and promote cultural diversity at UCLA Anderson. More than 400 UCLA Anderson students, faculty and staff participated in the festivities. The North Terrace was transformed into a sea of red with Lunar New Year décor and authentic food from Greater China and Korea was served. To help the UCLA Anderson community better understand the traditions, the three clubs prepared a variety of celebratory games and activities, including learning Chinese calligraphy, reading Chinese puzzle, winning red envelope and playing mahjong, Korean Yut and Jegi games. The event was hosted by GCBA, AMSA, and KBSA, and supported by the CGM, Anderson Student Association and the Office of Diversity Initiatives and Community Relations.

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Tuesday, February 5, 2019, Ackerman Union

Center for Global Management Mentor Program Gathering with Past and Present Mentees at Wolfgang Puck

On Tuesday, February 5, 2019, 2017-18 mentees shared experiences and networked with 2018-19 mentees at a dinner gathering at the Wolfgang Puck restaurant, Ackerman Union located in the heart of the UCLA campus. The CGM mentor program connects current full-time MBA, FEMBA, EMBA and UCLA-NUS EMBA students with members of the center's advisory board, a dedicated and actively engaged group of visionary global leaders spanning a variety of geographies and industries. The program provides students with a unique opportunity to connect and form meaningful relationships with board members, who offer valuable counsel and guidance on professional endeavors, living and working abroad, global business and life lessons. By playing a direct role in shaping the next generation of global leaders, board members contribute in the most meaningful ways. Mentees gain valuable guidance in academic and career direction, obtain advice and perspective, gain insights into industries and professions of interest, and learn about professional and personal development skills required to succeed. The program was established to augment knowledge and understanding among students interested in pursuing a career in international business and management across a variety of industries and disciplines, as well as living and working abroad upon graduation. During the 2018-19 academic year, four full-time MBA, three FEMBA and one UCLA-NUS EMBA students are participating as mentees in the sixth year of the program.

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Friday, February 1, 2019 11:30 AM-1:00 PM, C-315, Entrepreneurs Hall, UCLA Anderson

China and Beyond – A Front Row Seat: Perspectives of an American Academic in Beijing” with Michael Powers, Zurich Insurance Group Professor of Finance at Tsinghua University’s School of Economics and Management

On Friday, February 1, 2019, UCLA welcomed to campus Michael Powers, the Zurich Insurance Group Professor of Finance at Tsinghua University’s School of Economics and Management. He discussed his experience as a guest business and economics commentator for China Radio International and shared his thoughts on the current "trade war." Powers also offered some broader perspectives on China's emergence as a world power, and the U.S. reaction as well as addressed both the country’s domestic as well as international priorities from an economic, political and security standpoint. Following his presentation, Min Zhou, director of the UCLA Asia Pacific Center and Walter and Shirley Wang Endowed Chair in U.S.-China Relations and Communications moderated a conversation. Powers also holds a joint appointment as Professor of Economics and Business at Tsinghua’s Schwarzman College. From 2012 to 2015, he served as chair of Tsinghua’s finance department – a unique assignment for a foreign academic in China. Powers is co-editor of The Political Economy of Chinese Finance (2016), and provides regular business and economics commentary for China Radio International’s Today and BizToday programs. The event was part of the UCLA Asia Pacific Center’s China and Beyond Forum that aims to highlight and understand emerging issues in the Asia Pacific region. The event was sponsored by the UCLA Asia Pacific Center, Center for Chinese Studies, the Center for Global Management and the Tsinghua University Alumni Association of Southern China.

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Thursday, January 31 through Tuesday, February 19, 2019

UCLA Anderson 2019 International Film Festival

The Anderson International Film Festival is a celebration of the school's diversity through the screening of movies from many of the countries that UCLA Anderson students call home. Following the success of last year's inaugural festival, the 2019 festival was held at UCLA Anderson beginning January 31 with a screening every Monday and Tuesday through February 19. It engaged twelve UCLA Anderson professional and identity clubs. During the six days, twelve movies and documentaries were screened from the home countries of many UCLA Anderson students. The film festival included films from Argentina, China, Cambodia, Germany, Italy, India, Korea, Japan and the United States. Each screening was followed by a Q&A session facilitated by first and second year full-time MBA students from that particular country and leaders of the associated student club. These students led conversations around topics that the film addressed and issues that the film raised. Local cuisine from the country/region was also served. The festival raised awareness of the diverse backgrounds of the UCLA Anderson community. 

One example of a film that was screened included "Tampopo,"  sponsored by the Japan America Business Association (JABA).  Japanese filmmaker Juzo Itami wrote and directed in this live action film. The story is about a truck driver who stops at a small family-run noodle shop and decides to help its fledgling business. It is intertwined with various vignettes about the relationship of love and food. JABA felt this film was important to screen as the Japanese have a distinct appreciation of food and the film also addresses the connection with western culture too. Tatsuro Nakajima ('19) co-president of JABA, together with Takaaki Hirabayashi ('19) and Kevin Tente ('20), both members of JABA led the discussion to educate the audience on the Japanese food culture as well as how Japanese people view the western culture. 

Over 70 students from across UCLA Anderson's full-time and fully employed MBA programs attended the screenings with many students attending more than one screening. Many who attended felt they had gained a better understanding and appreciation of the country and culture as a result of attending the screening and participating in the conversation. The festival was presented by the UCLA Anderson Entertainment Management Association and was sponsored by the Center for Global Management, Diversity Office, Center for MEMES, International Business Association and the Anderson Student Association.

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Thursday, January 31, 2019, 11:30 AM-12:30 PM, Korn Convocation Hall

Robertson Lecture Series on Global Business Leadership with Stephan Shakespeare, CEO and Co-Founder, YouGov on "What the World Thinks: Big Data Analytics and Its Impact on Business, the Public Sector and Global Public Opinion"

On Thursday, January 31, 2019, the Center for Global Management hosted Stephan Shakespeare, CEO and co-founder of YouGov, a global big data analytics company and pioneer in internet-based market research and polling, for a fireside chat with Interim Dean Al Osborne before an audience in Korn Convocation Hall. The conversation centered around big data analytics and its impact on business, the public sector and global public opinion.  Shakespeare discussed the company's innovation-led strategy and expansion into international markets. He explained how YouGov collects opinions from around the world and how companies, non-profits and the media look to YouGov to better understand what the world thinks about brands, politics and current affairs to drive their business decisions and identify growth opportunities. He also addressed the impact of big data analytics on business; advanced technology and how it can be used to predict elections and national sentiment; and blockchain and how it empowers users and enables more effective ad targeting as well as the broader implications of cyber threats.  Shakespeare also shared his thoughts on using data for public good to tackle global social issues and how emerging ways of measuring and sharing opinion will create new risks and opportunities for society and business. The conversation also touched on many other topics, including Brexit and data protection. A private luncheon followed in the executive dining where the discussions continued. Stephan Shakespeare co-founded YouGov in 2000. One of the pioneers of internet research, Shakespeare has been the driving force behind YouGov's innovation-led strategy. He was chair of the Data Strategy Board for the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills 2012-2013 and led the Shakespeare Review of Public Sector Information. He was also recently appointed as a commissioner for the Social Metrics Commission, an independent charity dedicated to helping UK policy makers and the public understand and take action to tackle poverty. Around 200 UCLA and UCLA Anderson students, alumni, faculty, staff as well as members of the Los Angeles World Affairs Council and the Los Angeles community gathered in Korn Convocation Hall for the event. Opening remarks were provided by Gerry Sims, MBA candidate from the Class of 2019 and executive vice president of the UCLA Anderson Tech Business Association. The event which was part of the CGM's Robertson Lecture Series on Global Business Leadership was organized by the CGM and supported by the UCLA Anderson Tech Business Association and the Master of Science in Business Analytics program, as well as the Los Angeles World Affairs Council. 

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Tuesday, January 29, 2019, 5:00 PM - 6: 30 PM, Executive Dining Room

Global Networking Reception for Students & Faculty - Strengthening Global Intellectual and Social Connections between Faculty and Students

A key objective of the Center for Global Management is to help strengthen the intellectual and social connections between faculty and students interested in global management and international affairs. On January 29, 2019, prior to the opening of spring quarter course bidding, over 150 students, faculty and CGM partners gathered in the executive dining room for the center's annual networking reception. The reception provided an opportunity for UCLA Anderson students to learn about the global opportunities available at UCLA Anderson both on campus and abroad, including the opportunity to travel abroad with the CGM's global immersion and FEMBA and EMBA international exchange courses, make a global impact with the center's support for international field study projects, learn a language, specialize in global management, enroll in on-campus global management courses and participate in the CGM's programming. The event provided an opportunity for students to interact with faculty who teach global courses as well as faculty and Ph.D. students who have global research and teaching interests. First year students networked with students across degree programs who have traveled abroad, enrolled in global courses and engaged with the center's programming. The center's faculty and executive directors, Professor Sebastian Edwards and Lucy Allard provided welcome remarks and an overview of the CGM's programming and introduced faculty members to the students. The reception provided an opportunity for students currently enrolled in global courses and engaged with the center's programming, including those who have traveled abroad for global immersion courses and international field study primary research to network and share their experiences with others.

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Saturday, January 26, 2019, 8:50 AM - 5:30 PM, Carnesale Commons at UCLA

The Los Angeles Global Health Conference, "Transcending Borders and Transforming Paradigms: Shaping a Future That Unites Us"

The fourth annual Los Angeles Global Health Conference, "Transcending Borders and Transforming Paradigms: Shaping a Future That Unites Us," took place at UCLA on Saturday, January 26. This annual global health conference hosted in Southern California brought together around 400 individuals from various disciplines across academia, NGOs, business, and the public sector to discuss the current status of world health, providing an interactive educational forum to address innovative ways to tackle health disparities-locally and globally. Home to individuals from more than 140 countries speaking 224 different languages, Los Angeles's rich cultural diversity makes it an ideal place to examine the current status of world health.Organized by UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, Fielding School of Public Health, Undergraduate Departments, and USC Keck School of Medicine and affiliated schools, the conference aims to educate and connect with members of the UCLA, USC, CDU and Los Angeles communities about the varying disparities both in our backyards and around the world.

The 2019 conference brought together students, faculty, researchers and professionals across the greater Los Angeles area from various backgrounds to create a dialogue to inform and equip future global health leaders. Given the current global events, priority shifting is key to successfully address health disparities both in our backyard and abroad. The opening keynote address, "Women in Global Health Leadership: The Hard Facts while Debunking Some Myths" was delivered by Michele Barry, MD, FACP, FASTMH, professor of medicine and tropical diseases at Stanford University. She is also the director of the Center for Innovation in Global Health and senior associate dean for global health. As one of the co-founders of the Yale/Stanford Johnson and Johnson Global Health Scholar Award program, Barry has sent over 1500 physicians overseas to underserved areas to help strengthen health infrastructure in low resource settings. 

The closing keynote, "Global Health: Keep the Vision Alive" was delivered by Haile T. Debas, MD, FACS, internationally recognized for his contributions to academic medicine who is widely consulted on issues associated with global health whose career as a physician, researcher, professor, and academic leader spans over four decades in Canada and the United States. 

The day also included numerous breakout sessions with a diverse group of speakers around four specific tracks addressing topics including: immigration, displacement, and vulnerable populations; planetary health and disaster relief; innovation, change and priority setting; and health along the continuum. The Los Angeles Global Health Conference is a student-led project of the Global Health Interest Group at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. The UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management was a silver sponsor of the event.

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Wednesday, January 23, 2019, 4:30 PM - 6:00 PM, A-201 Collins Center, UCLA Anderson

"From Campus to Market: Technology Transfer in the United States and Israel" with Amir Naiberg, President and CEO, UCLA Technology Development Corporation

On Wednesday, January 23 in the late afternoon, students, faculty and members of the local community enjoyed a presentation and moderated discussion with Amir Naiberg, associate vice chancellor and president and CEO of UCLA Technology Development Corporation who shared insights from his experiences in Israel and compared the U.S. and Israel's two systems for turning university innovations into commercialized products. He compared the two countries in terms of entrepreneurial ecosystems, legal, cultural, and financial issues. Naiberg also provided insights from his experience working at the Weizmann Institute of Science's technology transfer company and serving in his current position at UCLA and addressed issues such as how do cutting-edge innovations make their way from university research labs into products sold by for-profit companies and how the path of technology transfer differs in the United States and "Start-Up Nation." Following his presentation, Yoram Cohen, faculty director of the Younes and Soraya Nazarian Center for Israeli Studies moderated the discussion. Amir Naiberg serves as Associate Vice Chancellor and President & CEO of UCLA Technology Development Corporation. The UCLA Technology Development Corporation, a non-profit technology company wholly-owned by UCLA, focuses on better protecting and optimizing the discoveries and inventions developed through UCLA research. Naiberg also leads the UCLA Technology Development Group, a campus wide resource that serves as a gateway to innovation, research and entrepreneurship at UCLA. Through this work, he works in concert with several on-campus incubators and accelerators to further advance innovation, entrepreneurship and research at UCLA. This event was sponsored by the Younes and Soraya Nazarian Center for Israeli Studies, the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management, UCLA School of Law's International and Comparative Law Program and the Department of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures.

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Wednesday, January 23, 2019, 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Dean's Conference Room

Lunch Series with Bart W. Édes, North American Representative of the Asian Development Bank on "Asian Economic Forecasts and Achieving Development Impact"

On Wednesday, January 23, the Center for Global Management hosted a luncheon with Bart W. Édes, North American Representative of the Asian Development Bank (ADB), an international development finance institution dedicated to reducing poverty in Asia and the Pacific.  The luncheon provided an opportunity for interested students from across the various MBA programs to enjoy an informal and interactive conversation and learn about economic forecasts for Asia in 2019 and how the Asian Development Bank achieves development impact - with examples from different countries. Édes addressed the impact of the U.S.-China trade conflict on Asia and the U.S., the region's massive infrastructure investment gap, implications of an aging Asia and promoting gender equality in the Asia Pacific region.  Édes, who has served as the Asian Development Bank's Representative in North America since October 2017, is responsible for mobilizing financing for ADB's developing member countries; sharing development knowledge and experience; establishing and deepening partnerships with public, private and nonprofit organizations in North America; and raising public awareness of ADB in Canada and the United States.  His previous experience at ADB, includes leading teams responsible for knowledge management, social development, gender equity, the social sectors, civil society engagement. Following the luncheon, Édes discussed career opportunities at the ADB with interested graduate students. The luncheon was organized by UCLA the Center for Global Management and supported by the Greater China Business Association and Asian Management Student Association.

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Thursday, January 10, 2019, UCLA Anderson Executive Dining Room

Networking Reception with Students from the University of Sydney Business School’s EMBA and UCLA Anderson EMBA Programs

The Center for Global Management hosted around 20 students from the University of Sydney Business School’s Executive MBA program at UCLA Anderson from January 6-10 for a one-week global management seminar focused on “Finding Opportunity in Disruptive Technology.” The seminar provided participants with an opportunity to complete part of their studies at UCLA and gain valuable global experience and insights through focusing on the innovation and creativity that are such an integral part of the business community in Los Angeles and California, including current academic research and business application around topics such as artificial intelligence, machine learning and deep learning business management impacts as well as business model driven innovation and the proliferation of big data . During the week, students visited Southern California Edison and the Stubbs, Alderton & Markiles Preccelerator. On Thursday, January 10, the students enjoyed a networking reception in UCLA Anderson’s executive dining room, hosted by the CGM where they had an opportunity to meet and connect with first year students from UCLA Anderson’s Los Angeles-based EMBA program.

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Sunday, December 16 – Sunday, December 23, 2018

33 students and 1 alumna travel to Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City for the CGM’s global immersion course to learn about “Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries: Focus on Vietnam,” with George Abe, lecturer in entrepreneurship and faculty director, Strategic Management Research Program

During the same week of winter break, 33 students from all four of UCLA Anderson’s MBA programs - full-time, fully employed, executive and global executive MBA programs, together with one EMBA alumna visited Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City for the in-country week of the CGM’s global immersion course, “Entrepreneurship in Developing Countries: Focus on Vietnam,” led by George Abe, lecturer of entrepreneurship at UCLA Anderson.

Throughout the course, students learned how political and economic policy in Vietnam play out in one of Southeast Asia’s most vibrant economies, Vietnam with a particular focus on entrepreneurship. The course exposed students to a country that is not well understood, but that holds considerable importance to Asia and inevitably on the global scene. During the in-country week, students had opportunities to hear from, engage and network with entrepreneurs in the country, including successful UCLA alumni doing business in Vietnam, through fireside chats, company and accelerator visits as well as through interactive, smaller group discussions. They were able to compare and contrast the start-up scenes in both cities too.

The inaugural sessions in Hanoi, included a presentation and fireside chat with Eric Hsu, a senior commercial services officer at the U.S. Embassy who provided an overview of trade, investment and U.S. companies doing business in Vietnam. This was followed by a fireside chat with Adam Sitkoff, executive director of the American Chamber of Commerce in Hanoi, whose primary mission is to promote American business in the country through the development of trade, commerce and investment between the U.S. and Vietnam. He explained that while Vietnam is dominated by local businesses, he felt that U.S. companies will soon dominate the country and acquire these local businesses. He also addressed the large counterfeit issue that Vietnam is currently facing. To better understand the start-up scene in Hanoi, students visited Vietnam Silicon Valley where the group heard from Vietnam Silicon Valley’s CEO and co-founder, Linh Han who co-founded and leads VSV Accelerator which has invested in, accelerated and mentored over 40 startups in Vietnam since 2014. VSV is the first initiative from the Vietnam Government to target and support startups and venture investors in the country. With its initial success, the VSV Project has been extended until 2020 by the Prime Minister. The project creates an ecosystem of innovations and technology commercialization in Vietnam by combining the Vietnamese entrepreneurial spirit and innovative nature with the most successful practices that the U.S. offers in startup development and mentoring, accelerators, and venture capital funding and investing. Students had an opportunity to break out into groups through interactive sessions with some of its start-up companies. At Vietnam Silicon Valley, students also heard from Aaron Everhart, CEO of Hatch!, who spoke about the entrepreneurial environment in Vietnam and its accelerator program – an intensive, 4-month program for early-stage innovation-based startups whose mission is to capture the value and entrepreneurship spirit of millennials (and the future Generation Z) by creating a community in which individuals can connect, develop and prosper.

In Hanoi, students also learned about the relationship between media and technology through a visit to ICOMM Media, a company that focuses on big data analytics for open source and internal data where they heard from UCLA alumnus, Ngoc Chi Le (M.A. ’10), chief of research. They also learned about the power of social enterprises in the country with a visit to Protec Helmet, and AIP Foundation. Protec is a social enterprise based in Vietnam and founded by U.S. NGO, AIP Foundation. Established in 1999, AIP Foundation works in partnership with local governments and communities around the world to address road safety. The students toured Protec’s helmet factory and heard from Greig Craft, the founder and president who is an internationally recognized road safety expert who provides guidance to governments, business and civil society throughout the developing world.

Students then traveled to Ho Chi Minh City. The inaugural speaker was EMBA alumnus Calvin Lam (’01), CEO of iBasic, an end-to-end designer, manufacturer and retailer of mid-priced underwear which has become one of the most popular brands for women and urban young families. Professor Abe led a fireside chat with Calvin about iBasic as well as his other business ventures which include forestry and a restaurant. They also heard from Crystal Lam, a Berkeley alumna, managing director of Vinawood, a leading global supplier of wood blind and shutter components who shared her experience running and managing a business and manufacturing operation in Vietnam. Later in the week, alumni Alex Wehrmann (’17) director of business development and investment for CLFD and Ken Duong (B.A. ’04), vice president of legal affairs and business development for Duong Business Consulting joined a panel discussion, moderated by Professor Abe. They talked about doing business in Vietnam and addressed the opportunities and challenges in the country and as well as compared and contrasted conducting business in Vietnam with the United States from a business and political perspective. Headquartered in Singapore, CFLD International is the international arm of CFLD, the world's only end-to-end master planner, creator and operator of full-scale New Industry Cities. Headquartered in Orange, California with offices in Vietnam and Thailand, Duong Business Consulting specializes in U.S. –ASEAN multi-lateral trade relations, with a strong emphasis on Vietnam and Thailand. A reception organized by UCLA alumni at the Hard Rock Café provided additional opportunities to meet and network.

Through a visit to Hive Saigon, students compared and contrasted the start-up scene between Hanoi and HCMC. Hive Saigon is a creative co-working workspace in District 2 where students had the opportunity to tour the facility and also hear from and interact with tenants, including both successful startups as well as new start-ups at the early stages of the start-up process. The group also had the opportunity to visit iCare Benefits, a for-profit social enterprise that provides low-income workers in developing countries with an employee benefits program. Trung Dung, the company’s founder and CEO discussed how the program enables manufacturers, social organizations, banks and service providers to serve workers at the bottom of the economic pyramid and provide them the lowest total cost of access to basic life changing products and services. They also visited Vietnam Waste Solutions (VWS), whose mission is to protect the environment by developing and deploying waste management projects and become the leader of waste handling service providers in the country. VWS operates landfills, recycle facilities, composting facilities and treatment facilities and has a contract with the Vietnamese government to collect waste. VWS is a licensed Vietnamese Corporation that is fully owned by California Waste Solutions, Inc. (CWS) a California corporation. Kevin Moore, the managing director of VWS who has more than twenty years of experience in solving environmental waste issues country addressed how the company is introducing new and advanced technologies into the market. During their time in HCMC, students also learned about private equity and venture capital in Vietnam from Johan Nyvene, CEO and managing director of Ho Chi Minh Securities Corporation (HSC), a securities brokerage and equities firm and the legal landscape in the country from Yee Chungseck, a partner at Baker & McKenzie.

During the week, students also experienced local culture, visited key sites of important historic significance and enjoyed local cuisine. They enjoyed a city tour of Hanoi, where they visited the Temple of Literature, a temple of Confucius; One Pillar Pagoda, a historic Buddhist temple; and the Hỏa Lò Hilton Prison, used by the French colonists in French Indochina for political prisoners, and later by North Vietnam for U.S. prisoners of war during the Vietnam War. During this later period, it was known to American POWs as the Hanoi Hilton. They also enjoyed a rickshaw tour through Hanoi’s old quarter. In HCMC, students visited the War Remnants Museum which contains exhibits relating to the Vietnam War and the first Indochina War involving the French colonialists; Independence Palace, the Notre Dame Cathedral and the Post Office. At the end of the week, students visited the Cu Chi tunnels, an immense network of connecting tunnels located in the Cu Chi District of HCMC, which are part of a much larger network of tunnels that underlie much of the country. The Củ Chi tunnels were the location of several military campaigns during the Vietnam War and were the Viet Cong’s base of operations for the Tết Offensive in 1968. On the Sunday, some students joined the optional tour of the Mekong River Delta, a vast maze of rivers, swamps and islands, home to floating markets, Khmer pagodas and villages surrounded by rice paddies. At the conclusion of the week, some students headed to explore other parts of southeast Asia.

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Sunday, December 16 – Sunday, December 23, 2018

40 students visit Chile for the CGM’s global immersion course, “Business Opportunities in Chile, Under A New Market-Friendly Government,” led by Sebastian Edwards, Henry Ford II Chair in International Management

In December over winter break, 40 students from UCLA Anderson’s full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs visited Santiago for the in-country week of the CGM’s global immersion course, “Business Opportunities in Chile, Under A New Market-Friendly Government,” led by distinguished professor and economist Sebastian Edwards, Henry Ford II Chair in International Management and a native of Chile.

During the course, the students learned how economic policy in Chile – the most successful country in Latin America in the last two decades – affects business opportunities. The course put Chile’s case in context with that of the rest of the Latin American nations (special mention was given to Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and Venezuela). The course also analyzed the way in which politics affects both economics and policy options. Before the in-country week, on-campus class sessions addressed some of the most important economic, business, social and political aspects of the country, cultural issues as well as social and business challenges. During the week in-country, students heard from many prominent business leaders, academics, politicians and senior policy makers as well as successful entrepreneurs. A number of high-level Davos-style conversations helped illuminate Chile’s economic and business environments covering a variety of sectors and topics with former ministers, presidential candidates, a former governor of the central bank, CEOs, board chairmen/women, owners and founders. A number of the sessions were held at Centro de Estudios Publicos (CEP), a private non-partisan, non-profit academic foundation dedicated to public issues and the most influential think tank in the country. Students also met with and had the opportunity to hear from successful and influential UCLA and UCLA Anderson alumni and saw firsthand the power of the UCLA brand and network in Chile. Students were amazed by the week, and thoroughly enjoyed their time in-county – they learned a great deal, were inspired, met good friends and had a truly immersive experience together.

The inaugural speakers for the first day provided terrific context and foundation from an economic and political perspective. The inaugural speaker was Rodrigo Vergara, former governor of the Central Bank (December 2011-December 2016) who now serves as vice-chairman of the board of Banco Santander. He provided an excellent overview of “The Chilean Economy.” Firstly, he talked about the trends of the Chilean economy and policies it has followed over the last few decades to explain why it is considered to be a successful economy. Secondly, he addressed what is going on now and the major macro challenges that the country faces today. Patricio Navia, then provided more of a political viewpoint which was equally fascinating. Patricio is a political scientist and columnist who specializes in democratic consolidation, political parties, elections and public opinion in Latin America. He provided his perspective on current affairs, politics today and how that reflects what has happened to Chile over the last 30 years. Students also heard from Rafael Guilisasti, vice chairman of Viña Concha y Toro (a family business and Chile’s leading wine producer) and president of the board of SQM controlling partners, the world’s biggest lithium producer. They learned about the global wine industry, importance of the industry to Chile and its evolution over the years. They also learned more about lithium and that up until very recently, Chile had the largest lithium deposits in the world – it was recently surpassed by Australia. Francisca Castro, director of Antofagasta Minerals also addressed the group. Antofagasta PLC Group is the largest private copper company in Chile. She discussed the mining and copper industry in the country and its importance to the Chilean economy and explained that today, the drivers in any decision are around sustainable growth, community and the environment. Students also heard from Maximo Pacheco, former CEO of International Paper and also former minister of energy on the “Energy Revolution in Chile.” Chile is a country that is undergoing a complete energy transformation and he explained that today the world is looking to Chile because of its energy development. However, Chile faces the difficult challenge of balancing economic growth, energy security and environmental sustainability.

Alejandro Bezanilla, CEO of AFP Habitat discussed the Chilean pension system and its future. This was a topic that had been covered quite extensively in class so students were quite familiar with the issues at hand and were able to ask very intelligent and well-informed questions. AFP Habitat is a publicly held corporation formed in 1981 when the new individual pension system was introduced in Chile. Alejandro described the pension system, challenges of the system and its performance. The Chilean pension system is currently under scrutiny and he addressed the different sources that the discontent comes from. Students also heard from Antonio Gil, CEO of Moneda Asset Management, the most successful boutique asset management firm in Chile that invests throughout the region, from Mexico to Patagonia across the capital structure in both equity and credit securities. Sustainable investment is key to what Moneda does and ESG has been part of the company’s DNA from the beginning. Later in the week, students heard from Gonzalo Undurraga, CEO of Explora, a family-owned business and luxury hotel owner and operator, focused on South America - its hotels serve as the base camp for exploration. The first property of Explora in Patagonia, launched in 1993 is the only hotel situated in the heart of the Torres del Paine National Park. He talked about the Explora brand, the business model of the company and its strategy. When discussing Explora’s business, he explained that it is about purpose and impact. He also talked about benefits of the brand and the company’s positioning – which inspires care and conservation. Gisela Escobar, vice president of corporate affairs for LATAM Airlines, provided an overview of the airline industry which she described as an extremely challenging and attractive industry for many reasons, yet it is also an extremely dynamic, high growth industry where business models are constantly changing. She explained that Latin America is the fastest growing region in the world for air travel driven by low penetration of air travel and that Chile is the most developed air market in Latin America. Expansion in the region is what has driven LATAM.

Students were also very fortunate to hear from two of the three co-founders of Cornershop, Juan Pablo Cuevas, COO and Daniel Undurraga, CTO and their terrific success story. Cornershop is a leading online marketplace for on-demand delivery from supermarkets, pharmacies and specialty food retailers in Mexico and Chile. The company was recently acquired by Walmart in September 2018 for $225 million. Students visited iF and met its founder Alejandra Mustakis. iF is a center of entrepreneurship and innovation in Chile which consists of an inclusive and collaborative ecosystem that brings together research, laboratories, business accelerators, workshops and events to provide entrepreneurs and innovators with the opportunity to carry out their ideas through creation and development. Students enjoy visiting and learning about centers of innovation and entrepreneurship in other countries and the visit was a complement to other sessions. At a co-working space, Manola Sanchez, former dean of UAI Business School who now serves on the board of Bci and was the first Chilean woman to obtain an MBA from Harvard addressed the group. She is also a member of a think tank trying to elevate Chile’s role and reputation as a financial hub. After discussing Bci, a leading financial institution in Chile by assets with national and international presence, she talked about her own career path. During the week, students were exposed to a number of extremely successful and influential female leaders in the business, political as well as the art worlds in Chile. They were inspired and really enjoyed the personal stories of speakers which made them real and relatable.

Professor Edwards likes to incorporate an art/cultural session into the week which is very appreciated by students and adds another dimension to the experience. In addition to the CEP, during the week students visited different venues, for example CorpArtes, a state of the art facility where artists exhibit. Here, they heard from UCLA alumna Bernardita Mandiola (B.A. ’91), an art historian and director of Fundacion AMA who talked about the Latin American art market and the ecosystem of players in the industry. She explained that the international market for Latin American art did not really happen until the end of the 19th century and then it really became important in the early 20th century, when Latin American artists started to make up the international avant-garde. On the Wednesday, the group traveled to the Llay-Llay region of Valparaiso to visit Jorge Schmidt & Co., a family-owned and operated business and currently the largest individual avocado producer in Chile, with 3,700 acres of avocado trees and an important grower in the Chilean fruit sector. The company’s growth over the last ten years has been explosive. Students enjoyed a tour of the packing house/plant to learn about the company’s operations and the importance of vertical integration. They then visited its second, new state of the art facility that will be fully automated. Following the tour, students were then greeted by Jorge Schmidt and his family at their residence where they generously hosted everyone for a wonderful BBQ lunch.

During the final academic day in Chile, students visited Kingston Family Vineyard in the Casablanca Valley, which has been recognized among the best wineries in Chile and for “making some of Chile’s best pinots” (Food & Wine). The students had read the Kingston Family Vineyards Stanford GSB case and so were familiar with it when they arrived. They were greeted by Tim Kingston, the owner and enjoyed a case study discussion with Tim, Marco Vera and Alex, one of the fellows at the vineyard. They were given a tour of the winery and broadly discussed the case and story of the winery. During dinner, they enjoyed wonderful wines, paired with the meal and the spectacular views over the Casablanca Valley.

During the week, students also had the opportunity to hear from and network with UCLA alumni. At the opening dinner which took place at Castillo Forestal, a heritage building, the group was joined by the president of the UCLA Anderson Chilean alumni network, Guillermo Tagle (’91), president of Credicorp Capital. CGM advisory board member, Joseph Barragan (B.A. ’77, ’79), former managing director for J.P. Morgan Chase who previously lived and worked in Santiago and had responsibility across Latin America joined the dinner and was also in attendance for the week. On the Wednesday evening, alumni gathered at the Ritz Carlton hotel for an alumni panel discussion and networking reception. Around 20 alumni and students home for the holidays attended. Professor Edwards moderated a conversation with Andres Echeverria (’93), president and portfolio manager for Frontal Trust; Ricardo Garcia (M.A. ’89), CEO of Camanchaca; and Alejandro Gonzalez Dale (’01), CFO of Falabella on their career trajectory post UCLA Anderson as well as their thoughts and insights on business opportunities in Chile under a new market-friendly government from both their personal as well as industry perspective. The panel discussion was very well received and the networking reception was a tremendous success. It was wonderful to see so many alumni and students networking together and the significant strength and influence of the UCLA /Anderson brand and network in Chile.

Time in Santiago would not be complete without a visit to the Museum of Memory and Human Rights, a Chilean museum dedicated to commemorate the victims of human rights violations during the military regime of Augusto Pinochet between 1973 and 1990. At the museum, the students were addressed by Chilean Senator Ximena Rincon who described the coup d’etat in Chile, its consequences and the transition to democracy and the subsequent process in the country. Students were then given a tour of the museum which they found to be extremely moving and emotional.

During their time in Chile, students also enjoyed a Santiago city tour. They visited St. Lucia Hill - it was at the foot of this hill that Pedro de Valdivia founded the city of Santiago in 1541. They also visited La Moneda, Presidential Palace, Plaza de Armas, Mercado Central and enjoyed 360 degree views of Santiago from Sky Costanera, the tallest building in Latin America. Some students also hiked San Cristobal Hill and visited the Bella Vista area, known as one of the most significant meeting points for Santiago’s bohemian life with art galleries, jewelry shops, colorful houses, several restaurants and an active night life. Students traveled a lot by metro and on foot to experience the city the way locals travel. At the end of the week, students enjoyed a leisurely day out to the cities of Valparaíso and Viña del Mar. During a boat and walking tour of Valparaiso, they learned about the history and importance of this major city, seaport, and educational center in the commune of Valparaíso that has been the headquarters for the Chilean National Congress since 1990. They walked through Plaza Sotomayor, past the monument that marks the tomb of Arturo Prat, the Chilean war hero and the Command in Chief Palace of La Armada, and rode on the funicular, known as “Ascensor El Peral.” They walked through the streets that were filled with some interesting street art. Street art had historically started as a form of protest under the Pinochet dictatorship. Decades later, street art is more popular than ever. Local and international artists have developed unique styles and tested them out all over. Later that day, they visited Vina del Mar known as the “Garden City” to enjoy some sun and ocean air. On the Sunday, some students joined the optional activity to the private Lodge Andino in the beautiful foothills of the Andes mountains to enjoy some hiking or horseback riding. Others stayed in Santiago and some headed to other parts of Latin America.

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Thursday, November 29, 2018, 6:00 PM, Raleigh Studios, Hollywood

2018 John Wooden Global Leadership Award Dinner Benefitting the 2018 John Wooden Fellows and Honoring Reed Hastings, Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Netflix

On Thursday, November 29, 2018, UCLA Anderson recognized Reed Hastings, co-founder and CEO of Netflix with the John Wooden Global Leadership Award, at a gala dinner held at Raleigh Studios in Hollywood. The distinction, named for legendary UCLA basketball coach, author and leadership expert John Wooden (1910–2010), is presented each year to an exceptional leader whose leadership style and service to the community reflect the same high standards of performance, integrity and ethical values set by Wooden.

“Reed Hastings has demonstrated leadership that is fueled by fundamental values – integrity, excellence, respect and collaboration,” said UCLA Anderson Interim Dean Al Osborne. “In the two decades since he co-founded Netflix, Reed has disrupted the status quo and led a revolution in the way entertainment is created and shared all over the world.”

In an onstage discussion with Susan Wojcicki (’98), YouTube CEO, Hastings commented on his award and lessons from Coach Wooden. “To be a great leader, you need to be a great person – trying to be the best person you can be. It’s all about working on yourself.”

Hastings co-founded Netflix in 1997. In 1991, he founded Pure Software, which made tools for software developers. After a 1995 IPO and several acquisitions, Pure was acquired by Rational Software in 1997. Hastings is an active educational philanthropist and served on the California State Board of Education from 2000 to 204. He is currently on the board of several educational organizations, including KIPP, Pahara and the City Fund. Hastings is also a board member of Facebook and was on the board of Microsoft from 2007 to 2012. He received his B.A. from Bowdoin College in 1983 and an MCSC in artificial intelligence from Stanford University in 1988. Between Bowdoin and Stanford, Hastings served in the Peace Corps as a high school math teacher in Swaziland.

The audience of more 700 included UCLA Anderson Board of Advisors members and other generous supporters, along with members of Coach Wooden’s family, members of the Anderson family, UCLA’s women’s gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field together with Basketball Hall of Famers Jamaal Wilkes (B.A. ’74) and Keith Erickson joined past Wooden Fellows, current UCLA Anderson students, alumni and faculty for a ceremony that included a special appearance and Coach Wooden tribute by Lynn Shackelford (B.A. ’69), former professional basketball player and broadcaster who played under Coach Wooden. Remembering his experience on the UCLA team, he remarked, “Coach always preached that what made him different as a coach was his emphasis on effort, not results. He practiced what he preached.”

Net proceeds from the annual dinner fund four $35,000 John Wooden Global Leadership Fellowships, given to deserving UCLA Anderson students who embody Coach Wooden’s leadership ideals and commitment to improving the lives of others. During the ceremony, the four 2018 fellowship recipients Jessica Barnette (MPH ’14, FEMBA ‘19), Leah Maddock Loh (MPH ’05, EMBA ‘19), Gerry Sims (FTMBA ’19) and Ryan Tan (UCLA-NUS EMBA ‘19) were recognized and awarded the John Wooden Global Leadership Fellowship, which is among the most prestigious honors Anderson students can receive. They took the stage to express their thoughts on what Coach Wooden’s values-based leadership means to them. Wooden Fellows are honored because they possess his focus on ethics, team spirit, skill, hard work and loyalty, along with a commitment to constant learning, continual improvement and innovation.

UCLA Anderson, in partnership with Coach John Wooden’s family, honors one exceptional leader each year with this prestigious award for his or her exemplary leadership and service to the community. Past recipients of the John Wooden Global Leadership Award include: Kevin Plank, chairman and CEO, Under Armour (2017); W. James McNerney Jr., retired president, CEO and chairman, the Boeing Company (2016); Ursula Burns, chairman and CEO of Xerox (2015); Paul E. Jacobs, executive chairman of Qualcomm Inc. (2014); Bob Iger, chairman and CEO of The Walt Disney Company (2013); Indra Nooyi, chairman and CEO of PepsiCo (2012); Peter Ueberroth, managing director of Contrarian Group (2011); Frederick W. Smith, chairman, president and CEO of FedEx (2010); Kenneth Chenault, chairman and CEO of American Express (2009); and Howard Schultz, chairman, president and CEO of Starbucks (2008).

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Tuesday, November 20, 2018 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Dean's Conference Room

Lunch Series with Grace Huang (’02), Co-founder and CEO, iPinYou on “Technology Development in the Marketing Space”

On November 20, the Center for Global Management welcomed UCLA Anderson alumna Grace Huang (’02), co-founder and CEO of iPinYou to campus to enjoy an informal and interactive conversation over lunch with students interested in learning about technology development in the marketing space. Huang founded iPinYou six years after graduating from UCLA Anderson and is responsible for strategic planning and operational management for the company. She is a branding and marketing expert and prior to iPinYou, worked for Proctor & Gamble in the United States and also McKinsey & Co. in Beijing. Founded in 2008, iPinYou is China's leading demand-side platform (DSP) that helps global brands identify, analyze, and engage Chinese consumers to succeed in the China market. Headquartered in Beijing, with offices in Shanghai, Guangzhou and Silicon Valley, the company has received the "Best in Class" award from Google DoubleClick, Baidu and Tencent for its programmatic marketing platform, and obtained a CNY 500 million in pre-IPO investment from strategic partner China Mobile and other investors. First, second and third year students from UCLA Anderson’s full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs, including students specializing in global management gathered for an informal and interactive conversation with Huang who started her entrepreneurial journey while at UCLA Anderson. During lunch, she discussed technology development in the marketing space; her career trajectory since graduating from UCLA Anderson from working with P&G’s marketing group to joining McKinsey and providing marketing strategy services to global companies; and her path towards the founding of iPinYou and its highly successful market intelligence platform and data-driven approach to market analysis and audience insights for the world’s largest consumer market, connecting brands and customers. Her first investor was UCLA Anderson alumnus Fritz Demopoulos (’97). Huang also commented on what inspired her to start iPinYou and explained how technology is changing how advertising and marketing works and described the differences in the landscapes between China and the U.S. The lunch provided a wonderful opportunity for students to hear insights, experiences and the personal journey of one of UCLA Anderson’s successful alumna entrepreneurs. The lunch was organized by the CGM with support from the AnderTech Business Association, Entrepreneur Association and Greater China Business Association.

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Friday, November 16, 2018, 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Dean's Conference Room

Lunch Series with Javier Guzman, Vice Governor of the Central Bank of Mexico on "Mexico's Economic Outlook and Monetary Policy"

On Friday, November 16, UCLA welcomed to campus Javier Guzman, vice governor of the Central Bank of Mexico. He was joined by Marlen Marroquin, executive regional director at the U.S.-Mexico Chamber of Commerce California Regional Chapter. Following a campus tour and meeting with Cindy Fan, vice provost for global engagement at UCLA and Professor Ruben Hernandez-Leon, director of the UCLA Center for Mexican Studies, students from the full-time, executive and fully employed MBA programs had a unique opportunity to hear from the vice governor during an interactive lunchtime conversation organized by UCLA Anderson's Latin American Business Association and Center for Global Management. 

During the luncheon, Guzman provided an overview of the general situation in Mexico, including the economic outlook for the country. He also discussed monetary policy and the important role of the Central Bank in the financial stability of the country. Various topics were also addressed including trade negotiations, the recent presidential elections as well as trends in the world economy. Economic activity in Mexico has remained resilient despite political and economic uncertainty in the first half of 2018, caused by the lead up to the elections and the U.S.-Mexico-Canada trade negotiations. Guzman also explained what Mexico is facing on the domestic front.  Despite the resiliency, the country continues to face challenges that include raising living standards by reducing poverty and inequality, as well as addressing crime and corruption. According to a recent IMF report, to tackle these challenges and boost growth in a way that will benefit a wider share of the population, reforms will need to focus on raising public investment and social spending, as well as re-invigorating the structural reform agenda with emphasis on strengthening the rule of law, fighting corruption, and reducing labor market informality. The luncheon provided a terrific opportunity for students to hear insights, perspectives and deep knowledge around these critical topics from such a prominent and accomplished figure in Mexico. Guzman has served in this role since February, 2013 and will remain in the position through December, 2020. From 1994 to 1999, he served as an advisor, alternate executive director, and executive director at the International Monetary Fund, representing Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Mexico, Nicaragua, Spain, and Venezuela. He also worked as an advisor for Ernesto Zedillo, former President of Mexico, in the High Level Group on Financing for Development, established by the UN Secretary General in support of the International Conference on Financing for Development in Monterrey.  In 2008, the Center for Latin American Studies' (CEMLA) Assembly elected him General Director of that institution. He held that position from January 2010 to February 2013.  The luncheon was organized by UCLA Anderson's Latin American Business Association and Center for Global Management and supported by the United States-Mexico Chamber of Commerce California Regional Chapter. 

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Thursday, November 15, 2018, 7:00 PM, Sofitel Beverly Hills

The Trade War and Global Food Security with Jim Collins, CEO of DowDupont's Agricultural Division

As trade tensions mount with China, retaliatory tariffs jeopardize the livelihood of U.S. farmers, ranchers and agricultural and food businesses across the country. They also threaten to raise prices of food for consumers and increase pressure on food security due to limited market access for producers in developing countries. On Thursday, November 15, Jim Collins, CEO of Corteva, DowDupont's agricultural division, one of the world's largest crop seed and protection companies addressed the Los Angeles World Affairs Council during a special dinner discussion on the state of the global agricultural markets and food security. The Center for Global Management is a member of the LAWAC who generously invited UCLA Anderson students to attend the special dinner discussion on this important issue.  Collins was joined in conversation by Jennifer Sirangelo, president and CEO of 4-H Council. "We believe in fair trade and not using food as a weapon," said Collins. He added that Corteva respects "what the U.S. government is doing today with regards to protecting intellectual property but not food." He explained that soybean exports to the U.S. have decreased significantly, acknowledging that there is a generation of American farmers who will be at negative growth for the next few years. Collins added that an agricultural company must put farmers at the center. He also suggested that agribusiness has a huge role to play in responding to climate change and that technological advances are changing the industry and creating new job opportunities. He listed areas that businesses like Corteva are hiring for, including engineers, data analysts and drone pilots. Farming also doesn't look like what you might expect when it comes to gender. "Women outnumber men by a factor of 2 to 1 globally in farming," Collins said, to the surprise of the audience. He encouraged the audience to research the facts so that they can use their voice and support government policies in food science. Prior to his role at DowDuPont, Collins was executive vice president of DuPont with responsibility for the company's Agriculture segment, which included DuPont Pioneer and Crop Protection. A supporter of youth education and leadership, Collins served on the executive board of the Chester County Council Boy Scouts of America and received an honorary American FFA Degree for his efforts to promote Agriculture education with youth in the United States.

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November 13-16, 2018

International Education Week 2018, "Connecting Across Borders" at UCLA

International Education Week (IEW) is a joint initiative of the U.S. Departments of State and Education to celebrate the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide which ran from November 13-16, 2018.

In celebration of IEW, UCLA offered a series of events to celebrate international education and exchange, campus diversity, global perspectives and global citizenship on campus. The UCLA International Institute, together with a team of campus partners, including UCLA Study Abroad, Dashew Center for International Students and Scholars, UCLA Residential Life and the UCLA Library planned a weeklong celebration of international education with around 30 cosponsors, including the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management. The week showcased UCLA's extensive international education resources that were informative, fun and intellectually stimulating. Featured events included information sessions on FLAS/Fulbright, funding and leveraging the study abroad experience, Peace Corps recruitment, latest developments in international justice as well as a panel discussion on careers in a globalized world. 

On Tuesday, November 13, the "UCLA Global Conversation," the featured event of UCLA's celebration of IEW 2018 took place in UCLA's Powell Library which attracted over 100 attendees from across campus as well as invited dignitaries and friends of UCLA. The keynote address, "Education for the Global Era" was delivered by Marcelo Suarez-Orozco, Wasserman Dean, UCLA Graduate School of Education and Information Studies. Welcome and introductory remarks were provided by Scott Waugh, executive vice chancellor and provost and Cindy Fan, vice provost for international studies and global engagement. Dean Suarez-Orozco's research focuses on cultural psychology and psychological anthropology, with an emphasis on globalization, education and global migration.

One of the major goals of vice provost Cindy Fan who also oversees the International Institute, is to enable as many UCLA students as possible - regardless of discipline or major - to gain international experience via campus classes, study abroad, international research, internships and/or work opportunities. International experience opens students' lives to new perspectives and other cultures. Studying and volunteering abroad teaches Bruins that people the world over have a stake in one another's success and share many problems that require global perspectives and collaborative solutions.

The UCLA International Institute seeks to prepare a new generation of leaders who have direct experience of the world. In addition to helping them study or intern abroad, that means encouraging students to study the histories, politics and cultures of other countries, to master foreign languages and to develop the cultural sensitivity to work effectively with people across borders. All of these goals, together with the campus units that support them, are celebrated during International Education Week.

UCLA offers an amazingly broad array of international resources that include the programs of the UCLA Study Abroad/ International Education Office and the many internationally oriented degree programs and research centers across campus (including those offered by the UCLA International Institute), all of which are supported by the UCLA Library.

Campus resources also include the programs that promote global connection, international understanding and cultural sensitivity at the Dashew Center for International Students and Scholars as well as the activities and events of UCLA Residential Life that support international students in undergraduate residence halls and graduate housing.

In addition, many UCLA student associations are international in nature, including those that highlight the contributions of international students to campus life and those that focus on international performing arts, discussions of international topics and development projects in foreign countries.

Globally oriented research centers are an integral part of UCLA campus life, including the Center for World Health at the Geffen School of Medicine, the Center for Global Management at the UCLA Anderson School of Management, the Promise Institute for Human Rights at UCLA School of Law and the UCLA Blum Center on Poverty and Health in Latin America.

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Thursday, November 8, 2018, 4:30 PM, Anderson Afternoon North Terrace

Celebrating Diwali at UCLA Anderson

To celebrate the international diversity of UCLA Anderson, the Center for Global Management actively supports cultural events hosted by international student clubs such as the South Asian Business Association (SABA). SABA promotes familiarity and understanding of the South Asian culture and traditions among Anderson students during their annual flagship event, the Diwali Festival. Diwali or Deepavali is the festival of lights that marks the victory of good over evil. It is celebrated every year in the fall, usually in the months of October and November in the northern hemisphere (spring in the southern hemisphere). On November 8, 2018, over 400 domestic and international students attended the weekly Anderson Afternoons which was transformed to celebrate the Diwali Festival. UCLA Anderson's North Terrace was decorated with diyas (lamps), traditional Indian food was served and members of SABA were dressed in traditional Indian attire. Various aspects of the Indian culture were on display with performances of a Bhangra dance performed by the UCLA undergraduate Bhangra troupe, known as Bruin Bhangra; and an acoustic Hindi song performance and a Bollywood dance showcase by SABA members. Other activities to engage the over 400 attendees included a mehndi/henna hand tattoo stall and a photo booth.

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Thursday, November 8, 2018, 4:00 PM - 5:00 PM, UCLA Anderson Executive Dining Room

Global Management Lecture Series: “The Creative Economy in Brazil: Transforming Cultural Diversity in Development” with Sérgio Sá Leitão, Minister of Culture, Brazil

Cultural and creative activities are Brazil’s vocations and are an important part of the DNA of the country’s society that contribute greatly to its economic and social development. On Thursday, November 8, in the late afternoon following a tour of the UCLA campus, Sérgio Sá Leitão, Brazil’s Minister of Culture visited UCLA Anderson together with Márcia Loureiro, the Brazilian Consul General for Los Angeles. He addressed an engaged group of students from across the various degree programs at UCLA Anderson as well as undergraduate, graduate and doctoral students from across campus studying law, political science and economics, for a presentation and conversation on the creative economy in Brazil and how such a large and culturally diverse country can be a driver for development. He discussed the vast potential in the creative economy and suggested that to improve and realize the potential, there is a need to stimulate cultural entrepreneurship and its connections with tourism and technology in every region and in all creative sectors. Brazil has to rise from a commodity-based economy to an economy of knowledge and creativity. He explained that the creative economy generates jobs, increases incomes, provides opportunities to local talent, engages the youth, improves quality of life, builds networks and connections, boosts innovation, strengthens identity and ultimately promotes the development of the country. The creative economy is of strategic economic and social importance and in addition to being a source of development, it also fosters inclusion. Before assuming his current position as Minister of Culture, Sérgio Sá Leitão was Rio de Janeiro’s Secretary of Culture, and was also the Ministry’s chief of staff during Gilberto Gil’s tenure. Previously, he served as the director of the National Film Agency and the CEO of RioFilme, and has been a Presidential advisor for the Brazilian Development Bank as well as served on numerous boards with significant experience in the private sector too. The event was organized by the UCLA Anderson School of Management’s Latin American Business Association and Center for Global Management and supported by the UCLA Center for Brazilian Studies and Department of Spanish & Portuguese and the Consulate General of Brazil, Los Angeles.

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Thursday, November 1, 2018, 6:30 PM - 9:30 PM, UCLA Anderson Executive Dining Room

Global Business & Policy Forum “Trade Wars and the Impact on the United States and California"

Although progress has been made with renewing NAFTA and agreements have been reached with Mexico and Canada, the risks associated with ever increasing tariffs between China and the U.S. could have grave consequences globally. What benefits come from the international exchange of goods and services, which are risked by a trade war? What is unfair trade, and which countries pay for the taxes and other barriers to trade? Who are the winners and losers from a trade war? What policy responses are appropriate for dealing with bilateral imbalances, if any? What are the consequences of tariffs targeting selected countries and what allows an "American First" agenda that was not an option after WWII? On November 1, the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management and UCLA School of Law's Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy  hosted its inaugural global business and policy forum of the academic year. Ed Leamer, UCLA Anderson distinguished economist who has served on the Councils of Economic Advisors or Governor Wilson, Governor Schwarzenegger, and Los Angeles Mayor Garcetti was joined by Stephen Cheung (B.S. ’00, MSW ’07). Cheung is former director of international trade at the Port of Los Angeles and now president of World Trade Center Los Angeles (WTCLA) which works to support the development of international trade and business opportunities for Southern California companies as the leading international trade association, trade service organization and trade resource in the Los Angeles region. Leamer and Cheung addressed these aforementioned questions, the ramifications for the United States and the impact of trade policy on business investment in California and Los Angeles. They also discussed the trade wars occurring around the world and implications for the global economy. The world’s two largest economies have squared off in a tit-for-tat trade war that threatens to disrupt international commerce. However, in spite of concerns about the risk of a full-blown trade war with China, the forecast for the U.S. economy is one of growth, albeit slower. California which boasts the world’s fifth largest economy, remains one of the most prosperous states, with a strong market that is expected to continue to grow. However, according to the recent UCLA Anderson Forecast, an economic slowdown is on the horizon. Looming over the forecast is the uncertainty of the current administration’s trade policies and the beginnings of a currency contagion that is enveloping a few developing economies (e.g. the Turkish lira and Argentine peso). What is unknown is the effect that any trade policy will have on business investment. China is our number one trading partner and if there’s one region in the United States that will be most impacted by this particular trade war, it’s going to be California and Los Angeles. A presentation by Leamer, which focused on the theory of international trade and posed many pertinent questions, was followed by a discussion by Cheung on the facts. They were then joined CGM’s faculty director, Sebastian Edwards, Henry Ford II Chair in International Management for a moderated discussion. Over dinner, there were many interactive table conversations where specific questions were discussed among the students, including: What public policies are needed to maintain the quality of life of America’s middle class? What public policies might protect America’s intellectual property? Students were also asked to comment on what public policies they feel are best for the youth of America. The discussion engaged 80 students and faculty from the UCLA Anderson School of Management and the UCLA School of Law. The Global Business and Policy Forum is a collaborative partnership between UCLA Anderson’s Center for Global Management and the UCLA School of Law's Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy.

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Thursday, October 18, 2018 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Dean's Conference Room

Lunch Series with CGM Advisory Board Member, Chris Legallet (B.A. ’83, ’88), Partner, Newport Asia LLC on “Global Investment Management”

On Thursday, October 18, in advance of the Center for Global Management’s fall board meeting, the CGM hosted a luncheon for students with advisory board member, Chris Legallet (B.A. ’83, ’88), a partner at the pioneer investment management firm, Newport Asia LLC, where he has been for almost 15 years managing partnerships investing in Asian and Chinese equity markets for high net-worth families, endowments, and institutions. First, second and third year students from UCLA Anderson’s full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs, including students specializing in global management and with an interest in global careers, gathered together for an informal and interactive conversation. Legallet discussed his unique career track and 30 years of investment experience in Asia’s emerging markets; his take on the development and future of Asia’s capital markets, China and its economy, and U.S.-China relations; as well as his life and travels throughout Asia. He also commented on the investment of China and India in Africa and challenges for U.S. investors in China and for Chinese investors in the United States. Legallet explained that he was a serial brown bag lunch attendee back in the 1980s and found the sessions immensely valuable, as he pondered his own post-graduation moves. He studied economics and Chinese as a UCLA undergrad, including a semester at Nankai University in Tianjin, China in 1982, which opened his eyes to the immense opportunity emerging in China. Hooked, he returned to China immediately after graduating, eventually settling in Hong Kong. In 1986, he returned to UCLA full-time for his MBA, which led him to Salomon Brothers in New York, where he advised institutions on Asian investments. In 1992, he switched careers from Wall Street to Investment Management, joining Jupiter Asset Management as a fund manager in Hong Kong. While there, he managed mutual funds investing in equities across the region, including the Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam, Korea, Indonesia, and one of the first Chinese mutual funds available for foreigners in 1994. Legallet has been working with his current partners at Newport Asia LLC in San Francisco since 1997, where he currently manages partnerships investing in Asian and Chinese equity markets for high net-worth families, endowments, and institutions. The lunch provided a really wonderful opportunity for students to hear insights, experiences and the personal journey from one of the CGM’s distinguished and accomplished board members. The lunch was supported by the Investment Finance Association, the Asian Student Management Association and Greater China Business Association.

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Saturday, October 13, 2018, 2:00 PM - 6:00 PM, A-202, Collins Center

“Symposium: Social Networks in a Transnational World: Chinese and Indian Entrepreneurs in the United States” 

On Saturday, October 13, the UCLA Asia Pacific Center and Center for India and South Asia co-organized a Symposium that focused on Chinese and Indian immigrant entrepreneurship in a global era. The Center for Global Management was a sponsor of the event. Through the inter-center, interdisciplinary collaboration and comparative case studies of the two largest immigrant groups – Chinese and Indians-in the United States, the symposium examined the changing nature of immigrant entrepreneurship in the context of globalization through a review of the following phenomena. One, how do social networks among the Indian and Chinese diasporas shape the formation of entrepreneurial cultures? Two, and conversely, how do entrepreneurial activities shape the formation of diasporic communities and networks? The symposium reviewed the global and local forces that have transformed the ways in which immigrants start and run their own business, the importance of local and transnational networks in business, and the ways in which entrepreneurs and scholars understand the phenomenon.

The full-house symposium included an academic panel on “Immigration and Changing Dynamics of Immigrant Entrepreneurship” with five scholars presenting their papers and research findings. This was followed by a stimulating and insightful roundtable discussion with four frontline entrepreneurs on “Entrepreneurial Cultures and Networks,” moderated by Professor Min Zhou, director of the UCLA Asia Pacific Center. The key themes that were explored included: immigration and entrepreneurship; entrepreneurial spirit and ethos, motivations and barriers, the formation of diasporic social networks, homeland connections and entrepreneurial development, and other related topics. Interim Dean, Al Osborne provided opening remarks together with Cindy Fan vice provost for international studies and global engagement; Chris Erickson, senior associate vice provost and director of the UCLA International Institute; and Min Zhou and Akhil Gupta, directors of the UCLA Asia Pacific Center (APC) and Center for India and South Asia (CISA).

This symposium which attracted over 70 students, academics and entrepreneurs was part of the UCLA joint-center collaboration between the Asia Pacific Center and the Center for India and South Asia. This program was made possible by a Cross-Center Collaborative Project Award from the UCLA International Institute, with additional support from the UCLA Anderson School’s Center for Global Management and Price Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, together with the UCLA Asian American Studies Center.

This event was co-organized by the UCLA Asia Pacific Center and Center for India and South Asia and cosponsored by the UCLA International Institute, the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management and Price Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation, as well as the UCLA Asian American Studies Center.

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Thursday, October 11, 2018, 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM, A-202, Collins Center

"Building Futures, Saving Pasts: Creating Businesses Using Cultural Heritage" 

Many of the world's poorest people co-exist with humanity's most important cultural heritage sites. Both these communities and the sites are in danger. The Sustainable Preservation Initiative (SPI) creates sustainable community businesses which utilize local cultural heritage in the developing world. Through this work, the SPI has not only built the futures of vulnerable communities (particularly women), but also saved the past through incentivizing local heritage protection. On Thursday, October 11, the Center for Global Management joined Impact@Anderson and the Cotsen Institute of Archaeology at UCLA in hosting archaeologist and community business developer, Paul Burtenshaw for a conversation on the results of his work and a discussion on how the SPI's methodology - the "SPI Business School" - creates sustainable economic impact and how cultural heritage is an asset for local sustainable development.  Over 50 attendees joined the discussion, including students from the full-time, fully employed and executive programs as well as students from the greater UCLA community to learn more about the economic opportunities that these cultural sites can provide and economic strategies that can be developed to benefit both the local communities as well as the heritage sites which are under threat. And how SPI provides communities with the tools they need to leverage these sites responsibly and help them thrive as communities. Paul Burtenshaw is the director of projects at the Sustainable Preservation Initiative (SPI). He is both an archaeologist, having carried out fieldwork in the Middle East, South America and West Africa, and a community business developer. Burtenshaw holds a Ph.D. with a focus on using cultural heritage as a sustainable development resource. SPI's methodology of community development was developed by Burtenshaw and has recently been adopted by the United Nations.

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Wednesday, September 26, 2018, 7:00 PM - 9:00 PM, United Kingdom

Worldwide Welcome Week Evening and Discussion on “No Deal Brexit – The Future of the City of London and the Financial Sector,” One Great George Street, London, U.K.

On Wednesday, September 26, the UCLA Anderson Alumni Network: UK Chapter held their Worldwide Welcome Weeks event in London. The evening featured a discussion on the future of the City of London post-Brexit with a distinguished panel of experts from London’s banking, financial services, and asset management sectors. The panel discussion focused on the history and future of Brexit—and the implications for the UK and the EU.

Moderator, CGM founding board member Toby Raymond (’86), managing director of Access Equity Management Ltd., pictured second from the right, moderated and led the discussion tracing Brexit from its origin to the present and forecasting the final culmination of the movement. Panelists included Iain Corby (’01) deputy chief executive officer of GambleAware, pictured far left and Marilou Calara (’86 UCLA, ’90 Haas), chief operating officer for EMEA Investments at Citi Private Bank, pictured second from the left. Jill Baldauf (’81), associate dean of alumni relations, far right, opened the program and shared a video greeting from interim dean Al Osborne.

Panelists discussed how changes in London, Paris and Frankfurt effect Switzerland in an increasingly globalized world; the future facing London on March 30, 2019 after Britain prepares to leave the EU; and thoughts on whether London will emerge unscathed or whether the loss of the passporting right will herald the start of a new era in a fintech-driven economy. Attending were alumni from UCLA Anderson’s full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs spanning 1981 – 2018, as well as UCLA undergraduates, LLM program graduates and prospective students. The discussion was followed by a networking reception.

Worldwide Welcome Weeks (WWW) is an annual event series presented by UCLA Anderson’s Office of Alumni Relations, alumni chapters and affinity groups to officially welcome the most recent graduating class to the UCLA Anderson alumni network. These events provide a platform for alumni to connect with their local network and gain access to valuable lifelong learning opportunities. In September and October 2018, Jill Baldauf (’81), associate dean of alumni relations and Mary Fleshood, director of international alumni initiatives, joined WWW events in Europe, where alumni enjoyed events in Lausanne, London, Paris and Madrid.

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Wednesday, September 5 – Wednesday, September 12, 2018, Czech Republic

40 students visit Vienna and Prague for the CGM’s Global Immersion course, “Doing Business in Central Europe,” led by Robert Zeithammer, associate professor of marketing

In early September, 40 students from UCLA Anderson’s fully employed MBA program visited Vienna and Prague for the in-country week of the CGM’s Global Immersion course focused on “Doing Business in Central Europe,” led by Robert Zeithammer, associate professor of marketing at UCLA Anderson and a native of the Czech Republic.

During the week in-country, students learned about the business challenges and opportunities in Austria and the Czech Republic – two neighboring countries in the heart of Europe. In addition to studying each country in isolation, a comparison of the two countries allowed students to examine the long-lasting effects of authoritarian central planning on economic development. Part of the same empire for almost 900 years, the two countries share much of their histories and cultures. In the second half of the 20th century, however, the Czech Republic was a satellite state controlled by the Soviet Union while Austria continued to be a free European state. Travelling from one capital to the other, the students crossed the now-invisible “Iron Curtain” to understand differences that persist to this day – more than 25 years after the collapse of the Soviet Union. Students visited various companies in an effort to compare and contrast companies in the same industry in the two neighboring countries. They also had an opportunity to meet and network with alumni in both cities too.

The week began in Vienna where the students heard from two alumni during a welcome dinner; Sharon Bryant (’14), CEO of Inteligand, a private life sciences company founded in 2003 in Vienna and Rainer Goeritz (’91), co-founder and investor, Digital Privacy GmbH, a tech start-up in Vienna. The inaugural company visit was a fascinating one. The group headed to Ludwig Reiter where they were given a tour of the production facilities and heard from Till Reiter, who serves as the CEO. The Ludwig Reiter shoe manufactory, established in Vienna in 1885, is a family-owned and run business which is now in its fourth generation. At the Austrian Chamber of Commerce (or WKO) which represents the interests of Austrian companies, students received an overview of Austria’s economy and business environment from a macro and micro perspective, and the country’s start-up ecosystem. At Erste Group Bank AG, founded in 1819 as the first Austrian savings bank, students learned about the bank’s business model and business activities from economist Zoltan Bakay and how in 1997, the Erste Group went public with a strategy to expand its retail business into Central and Eastern Europe. Today, it is one of the largest financial services providers in CEE. Students also learned about the characterization of the region, impact of communism and the economic stagnation that caused the falling, as well as areas where progress has been made and some of the challenges that remain, such as the need to reduce regional disparities, add higher value-added jobs and improve demography. Students enjoyed a visit to Julius Meinl, the ambassador of Viennese coffeehouse culture. Here, they were greeted by the owner, Thomas Meinl, who represents the fourth generation of the Meinl family running the business. They received a fascinating tour of the roasting plant and learned about the coffee production system, roasting process and packaging and the different type and quality of beans, Robusta and Arabica. Thomas Meinl spoke about the company’s history and business. The company is 155 years old and hence has been through a lot of history in Austria. He explained that much has changed over the years, including customers tastes and values as well as innovation in the coffee business. During their time in Vienna, students also visited Emakina CEE and through case study examples were able to better understand the cultural differences that impact marketing and advertising in the different regions. The Emakina Group is one the top three independent digital communication groups in Europe.

On both sides of the border students visited wineries, a growing and important industry in Central Europe. On the Austrian side, they visited the Mayer am Pfarrplatz winery, the epitome of Viennese Heurigen culture with a centuries-old tradition crafting the finest Viennese wines in Heiligenstadt since 1683. Students were given a tour of the winery to better understand and appreciate the wine-making process and then enjoyed some wine-tasting as “Beethoven Haus,” where it was understood that Beethoven wrote his Ninth Symphony. Ulrike Hager, managing director of the regional wine board Weinviertel presented some very interesting facts about the wine industry, including global and local production, world wine consumption and trends. She also addressed the export and import markets and the Austrian wine market specifically, including the structure of the market, production and consumption and the Austrian wine export boom. On Sunday, September 9, the transition day from Vienna to Prague, the group first visited the majestic Lednice Castle. After a traditional Moravian lunch, they headed to Sonberk, the architectural icon of Czech Republic’s winemaking. Sonberk, whose grapes are sustainably grown has won a number of competitions and awards for its wine, including from Decanter World Wine Awards. Dagmar Fialová, sales and marketing director guided the group on a tour of the vineyard. Loess soil, modest elevation and south to southeast exposure make ideal conditions for grape varieties such as Riesling, Sauvignon, Traminer, Pinot Gris, Chardonnay, Pálava which students had the opportunity to taste, enjoy and purchase.

In Prague, students visited Česká Spořitelna, the largest Czech bank and part of the Erste Group. Česká Spořitelna was established in 1825 and boasts the longest tradition among banks on the Czech market. Here, students were presented with a snapshot of the macroeconomic situation in the Czech Republic by the Bank’s economists who discussed the Czech banking sector and history of Česká Spořitelna as well as the risks and emerging trends in the sector. Czechs are beer lovers and so a visit to Prague would not be complete without learning about this important sector. At the Prague office of Plzensky Prazdroj, the leading producer and exporter of Czech beer, students learned about the company from Drahomira Mandikova, director of corporate affairs for central Europe. She described the history of Czech beer and the importance of Birell, the bestselling non-alcoholic beer in the Czech Republic that appeared on the market in 1992. She also addressed the topic of female leadership in a male-dominated industry. At Nestlé Cesko s. r. o., students heard from Lucie Presslová, brand manager of ORION Chocolate tablets and learned about operating a global brand in the Czech Republic: challenges faced and lessons learned. ORION is one hundred percent local with local R&D, local production and local people and Lucie discussed localness as a strong shopping motivation for the Czech consumer. At STRV, a software design, engineering and one-stop mobile app development company located in the “Silicon Beach” neighborhood of Prague, students were met by David Semerad, co-founder and CEO. He discussed his entrepreneurial path and also explained the history of the company, its structure and what the company does in terms of sustainability. During the week in Prague, students also learned about the Czech media landscape (online and print) from Pavlína Louženska at 2FRESH, a design, development and communications agency that develops digital products, apps, websites and campaigns. She discussed the challenges, such as old structures and political influence and the current trends in the sector. They also learned about the Czech film industry from Martin Palán, owner of Bontonfilm, the number 1 distributor of movies on DVD, Blu-ray and 4K Ultra HD for major Hollywood studios, independent studios and local productions in the Czech, Slovak and Hungarian markets. He provided a broad picture of how the media and entertainment industry in these markets works. UCLA Anderson FEMBA alumnus, Miron Ilincev (’16), engagement manager at McKinsey shared his thoughts on FEMBA’s five steps to a successful life and talked about his own career trajectory. He also addressed working in Europe vs. the U.S., the business climate in the Czech Republic and Central Europe and also touched on what Europe thinks about the United States. Miron joined the group later that evening for the closing dinner at Villa Richter - Piano Nobile, located by Prague Castle. Vasily Korovkin (’18), who had just graduated with his Ph.D. in economics and recently moved to Prague to start his tenure track as an assistant professor at the Center for Graduate Research and Education at Charles University (CERGE-EI) also joined the evening.

A visit to Central Europe would not be complete without experiencing local culture. In Vienna, students enjoyed a guided tour and discovered Vienna’s greatest sights and hidden gems including the Imperial Palace, Kohlmarkt Street and St. Stephens Cathedral. Some students enjoyed the Opera Carmen at Vienna’s beautiful State Opera House, visited Schonbrunn Palace or experienced a boat ride on the Danube River. Students also discovered the magical “city of a hundred spires” and enjoyed a walking tour of Prague’s fairy-tale small lanes to see the city’s major landmarks, including the Old Town Square and Wenceslas Square and walked across the Charles Bridge to visit Prague Castle where they enjoyed a spectacular view of the medieval Czech capital.

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Sunday, September 2 – Saturday, September 8, 2018, South Africa

40 students visit Johannesburg and Cape Town to meet with social entrepreneurs for the CGM’s Global Immersion course, “Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation in South Africa,” led by Gayle Northrop, lecturer of social entrepreneurship

During the first week of September, 40 students from UCLA Anderson’s fully employed and full-time MBA programs visited Johannesburg and Cape Town as part of the CGM’s Global Immersion course focused on “Social Entrepreneurship and Innovation in South Africa,” led by Gayle Northrop, a lecturer at UCLA Anderson and also adjunct faculty at the University of Cape Town’s Graduate School of Business.

During the one-week in-country, students had many opportunities to hear from and engage directly with social entrepreneurs in the country through site and accelerator visits as well as through interactive smaller group discussions. A reception was also organized in Johannesburg which provided further opportunities to network and connect with inspirational people who care about positive social change.

While in Johannesburg, students enjoyed a guided tour of Soweto and learned about the turbulent history and diversity of the people and culture in Kliptown – a township in Soweto. They also visited the Apartheid Museum and Mandela Exhibition celebrating the life and times of Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela. Students met with eKasi Entrepreneurs where they heard from its founder, Elvis Sekhaolelo. eKasi Entrepreneurs is a non-profit organization dedicated to shaping the state of townships and rural areas in Southern Africa through skills development, public-private collaborations, social innovation and access to markets. It helps township entrepreneurs to run their businesses by mentoring and equipping them with necessary business skills and training through the eKasi Entrepreneurs Academy. During the visit, students interacted with over 10 entrepreneurs to understand the challenges and struggles they faced with creating a business. Businesses ranged from a clothing brand company to a catering company. Students also mentored these entrepreneurs and had an opportunity to apply the business concepts and skills learned at UCLA Anderson in the functional areas of finance, marketing and organizational development to help provide guidance to the entrepreneurs on how to price services and brand their business. In Johannesburg, students also visited the Harambee Youth Employment Accelerator, a nonprofit social enterprise that helps unemployed youth find employment through training and partnerships. Here, the youth practiced mock interviews with the students who also had an opportunity to provide guidance and feedback. On Monday, September 3, students enjoyed an evening networking reception with social entrepreneurs, local business leaders and UCLA partners on the rooftop bar of Radisson Hotel Sandton with terrific views of Johannesburg. Nine guests joined the reception, including UCLA Anderson alumna Laura Parker (’13), executive director of the Boys & Girls Club of South Africa and Ross Beerman, CEO and co-founder of AllLife Insurance a life insurance company that offers affordable life insurance to people living with HIV of Type 1 or 2 diabetes which the students also visited. Alastair Van Heerden, Senior Research Specialist for the Human Sciences Research Council who has worked with two AMR teams and one GAP team and will be working with another AMR team this year also attended the reception.

Students then traveled to Cape Town, where they visited organizations such as Khayelitsha Cookies, a social enterprise with an aim to produce the best cookies in South Africa while empowering and hiring previously unemployed and disadvantaged women from Khayelitsha, a township community with a high unemployment rate and numerous related social problems. Here, students provided input on the organization’s marketing and sales strategy as well as feedback on its operations and production. They visited Red Bull Amaphiko, an international program aimed at giving wings to social entrepreneurs who are using their talents and creativity to make a difference in their communities. At RLabs, they heard from Marlon Parker founder and chief innovation officer. RLabs is a global movement and social enterprise that creates an environment for community driven innovation and reconstruction, empowering people to make a difference in the lives of others through skills and training, technology, social enterprise incubation and impact investing. Students also visited Pick n Pay, a major retailer in South Africa that strives to address socio-economic challenges through a supply of high-quality, affordable food for all customers, while providing significant employment and economic opportunities across its value chain. Later in the week, the group toured the Solution Space in Philippi Village, one of the largest townships in Cape Town. Philippi Village is an entrepreneurial development, that provides space where entrepreneurs and businesses can grow and where residents can develop skills and increase their employability.

Students also had the opportunity to visit Thokozani. Launched in 2003, Thokozani produces fine wines ethically. Here, they learned about the wine industry in South Africa and Thokozani’s central and crucial focus on training and development as an absolute necessity to the achievement of sustainable economic empowerment. During their time in South Africa, students also experienced local culture, visited key attractions and enjoyed some local cuisine. They enjoyed a scenic drive along the Cape Peninsula to Cape Point and the penguin colony at Boulders Beach, as well as ascended by cable car Cape Town’s famous peak, Table Mountain. The course was a unique, meaningful and impactful experience for students and was very eye-opening to see the progress that is being made in South Africa and how much is happening in the area of social innovation and social entrepreneurship and understand how they each can make an impact.

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Thursday, August 30, 2018, London, UK

Students Enjoy Lunch with CGM Founding Board Member, Toby Raymond (’86) While on Exchange at London Business School

During the summer, around 50 FEMBA and EMBA students participated in one-week exchanges at eight partner schools. A new exchange agreement with London Business School in the UK, provided an opportunity for seven students (2 EMBA and 5 FEMBA) to study at LBS in August/September during three one-week block sessions. Students took courses such as private equity and venture capital, strategies for growth, brand management, strategic innovation, and paths to power. On Thursday, August 30, Sophie Gao (FEMBA 2020), Martin Komal (EMBA 2019) and Cameron Pettey (FEMBA 2019) had an opportunity to enjoy lunch with CGM founding board member, Toby Raymond, managing director of Access Equity Management Ltd. who relocated to London in 1992 to work as a market maker in financial derivatives products, and established futures arbitrage and proprietary trading programs for an international trading firm. Raymond began advising on alternative asset investments in 1997 and established Access Equity Management Limited in 2000. The luncheon at The Windsor Castle provided a wonderful opportunity for our exceptional students to connect with and learn firsthand about European business and markets from a distinguished and accomplished global leader. They were also joined by London-based Matthew Daines, executive director of development in Europe for UCLA.

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Friday, August 24, 2018, Regent Singapore Hotel

UCLA Global Forum in Singapore: "Ahead of the Curve: From Traditional Education to Lifelong Learning" 

In August, UCLA Chancellor Gene Block and Vice Provost of Global Engagement, Cindy Fan visited the global Bruin family across Asia where they traveled to Bangkok, Manila, Jakarta and Singapore. On Friday, August 24, during their visit to Singapore, the UCLA Singapore Chapter, including alumni leaders Jennifer Loh (B.A. '98) and Chong Meng Lai ('05), pictured far left and center, welcomed Chancellor Block and Vice Provost Cindy Fan (second from left) to Singapore. The Chapter held a Global Forum with UCLA Anderson alumna and Center for Global Management founding board member, Hwee Hua Lim ('89) who delivered a presentation titled, "Ahead of the Curve: From Traditional Education to Lifelong Learning." In her presentation, she discussed the challenges of AI on employment, and the need for institutions of higher education to adapt to skillsets required of students in the future in order to equip them for their careers in the future. Over 100 alumni, new students and their parents attended the evening of discussion and networking. Hwee Hua Lim, pictured second from right together with husband Andy Lim ('89), is an executive director of Tembusu Partners and a senior advisor to KKR & Co. She is chairman of the Asia Pacific Exchange and an independent nonexecutive director of Jardine Cycle & Carriage Ltd., United Overseas Bank and BW Group. Lim was first elected to Parliament in December 1996 and served until May 2011. She last served as minister in the prime minister's office, Singapore, and concurrently as second minister for finance and transport. 

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Monday, August 20, 2018, UCLA Anderson

The CGM Hosts an Evening of Networking with Students from ESSEC Business School’s EMBA and Digital Leadership Programs and UCLA Anderson’s FEMBA, EMBA and UCLA-NUS EMBA Programs

The Center for Global Management welcomed over 50 students from the EMBA and Advanced Certificate in Digital Leadership programs at ESSEC Business School, France to UCLA Anderson from August 19-24, 2018 for a one-week global management seminar focused on “The Business of California.” The week provided participants with an opportunity to complete part of their studies at UCLA and gain valuable global experience and insights. Content focused on the innovation and creativity that are such an integral part of the business community in Los Angeles and California, including current academic research and business application around topics such entrepreneurship, technology and business model driven innovation and its impact on the global mobile industry, the proliferation of big data and its efficient intermediation, as well as idea generation and the fundraising process. During the week, students visited Amgen, Hatch Escapes, Disney Imagineering and Versus Systems. On Monday, August 20, the students enjoyed a networking reception on the North Terrace, organized by the CGM where they had an opportunity to interact with faculty teaching during the week as well as meet and connect with students from UCLA Anderson’s EMBA and FEMBA programs and from the UCLA-NUS EMBA Class of 2019 who were on campus for the first of their two week UCLA residencies.

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Friday August 17, 2018, 1:00 PM-2:00 PM, A-201, Collins Center

Global Management Lecture Series “Non-Market Risks: Geopolitical Realignment and U.S.-China Conflicts” with Christine Loh

The current “trade” conflict between the United States and China is really about geopolitics. There are also conflicts between the United States, its immediate neighbors and Europe who are traditional allies. A refashioning of the world order as we know it has begun. This reshaping will likely take decades and the process will be non-linear and unpredictable. These changes will affect other countries and their economies. Geopolitics and politics are non-market risks that cannot be ignored as they are impacting industries, investments and businesses. On Friday, August 17, the Center for Global Management joined the UCLA-NUS Executive MBA program in hosting Christine Loh, a leading voice in public policy in Hong Kong. During the lunchtime presentation and discussion, Loh addressed the deconstruction of geopolitical changes that are taking place to enable a deeper understanding of how managers may consider them in the longer-term in shaping their firms’ strategies. With many global examples, she discussed the importance of understanding, analyzing, mitigating and responding to non-market issues - political, economic, social and technological and the questions to ask when assessing non-market risks. The packed classroom included many international exchange students, as well as students from the UCLA-NUS EMBA and LA-based EMBA programs. Many global and diverse perspectives and insights were shared during an engaging Q&A session that followed. Professor Ed Leamer, Chauncey J. Medberry Professor of Management who will lead a group of over 50 EMBAs to Hong Kong and China in September for the EMBA International Business Residency also joined the discussion that addressed U.S.-China relations, including cross-border investment and trade. Christine Loh currently serves as chief development strategist at the Institute for the Environment at Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and is the former Undersecretary for the Environment of the Hong Kong S.A.R. Government (2012-17). During AY 2017-18, she taught a new course at UCLA Anderson, titled “Understanding Politics: The Global Context for Doing Business.

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Sunday, August 12, 2018, UCLA Anderson

The CGM Welcomes International Exchange Students from 9 Partner Universities and Hosts an Evening of Networking with UCLA Anderson’s EMBA and FEMBA Students

Managed through the Center for Global Management, one-week exchanges conducive to working students’ schedules are offered over the summer with international partner universities. In 2018, over 50 FEMBA and EMBA students are scheduled to participate in one-week exchanges at nine partner schools during the summer and in December. On Sunday, August 12, the CGM welcomed around 30 students from these same nine partner schools who joined classes with UCLA Anderson’s EMBA and UCLA-NUS EMBA students during a one-week block of elective courses. The CGM hosted an orientation and networking reception for students to learn more about Los Angeles, UCLA and UCLA Anderson, as well as network with peers from other top international business and management schools. A tour of the beautiful UCLA campus was also provided. Students from UCLA Anderson’s EMBA and FEMBA programs, participating on exchange over the summer joined the networking reception. Many reconnected with students they had met earlier in the summer at their host institutions and also were introduced to new friends from schools they will soon be visiting on exchange. The one-week exchange block at UCLA Anderson coincided with the two-week UCLA residency for the UCLA-NUS EMBA program so there were tremendous opportunities for all students at UCLA Anderson to interact and network with peers from around the world during the week.

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Saturday, August 11 & Sunday, August 12, 2018, Korn Convocation Hall, UCLA Anderson

2018 Global Media Blockchain Summit – Los Angeles

The 2018 Global Media Blockchain Summit was hosted at UCLA Anderson’s Korn Convocation Hall – the first time that the Summit had been held in Los Angeles. Closely following the significant growth of blockchain technology globally and China’s most recent Five-Year Plan, emphasizing the importance of innovation and new technologies, the Summit connected the resources, knowledge, talent and expertise from the U.S. and China. The two-day conference brought together business leaders, technologists, blockchain start-ups, investment and marketing professionals from a variety of industries to build interconnection with the global blockchain community. UCLA Anderson alumni and FEMBA and EMBA students pursing the Global Management specialization and certificate engaged in dialogue to learn more about the most updated blockchain technology and related industry applications to better understand how this cutting-edge technology – which is already having a significant impact on the business community – can have a positive impact on daily lives globally. The conference included sessions focused on applications in media and entertainment, healthcare, real estate – key industries that drive the Californian economy. Saturday’s opening keynote address discussed the blockchain investment landscape and was delivered by Andrew Gu, founding partner, Danhua Capital. On Sunday, the keynote address on the current state of blockchain technology was delivered by Rahilla Zafar, Managing Director, ConsenSys. Key members of the organizing committee included two UCLA Anderson’s executive MBA class students Renee Xue and June Chu, who recently launched NUTOPIA, a start-up company with a focus on blockchain technology application in the entertainment industry. The Summit, which attracted around 500 attendees over the two days, was co-hosted by BIMG, NUTOPIA, IDEAS, LA Blockchain Lab and NOVA ONE.

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Saturday, July 28, 2018, Dickson Plaza, UCLA

The CGM Engages with FEMBA and EMBA Admits At Palooza 7

On Saturday, July 28, 2018, UCLA Anderson celebrated a tremendously successful Palooza 7 which attracted over 1,350 people. The seventh annual fun-filled family event, formerly known as FEMBApalooza, was hosted by the FEMBA and EMBA programs. It was held on UCLA’s Dickson Plaza and served as the official welcome event of the entering classes: FEMBA Class of 2021 and EMBA Class of 2020 and showcased the people, programs and available resources of UCLA Anderson.

The event brought together students and alumni from many of UCLA Anderson’s programs — the FTMBA, FEMBA, EMBA, UCLA-NUS EMBA, Ph.D., and MFE - and included members of the Classes of 1970, 1972, 1973 and over 225 incoming FEMBA, EMBA and FTMBA students from the recently admitted Classes of 2021 and 2020. Faculty, family and friends joined. The CGM conducted a “Learning on the Learn” mini TEDx-type session on the global opportunities at UCLA Anderson and shared information on the international programming available both on and off campus, including the global immersion and international exchange courses.

Alumnus Mark E. Lee from the FEMBA Class of 2017 joined CGM executive director Lucy Allard (’06) and talked about his engagement with the CGM, including participation in five global immersion courses, including as a teaching assistant for two courses that traveled to Japan, Thailand/Myanmar; as a CGM mentee; as well as his decision to pursue the specialization in global management. The CGM also managed a booth to showcase and highlight the global courses, programming and opportunities available to students. The grand prize for the afternoon was a Palooza global immersion fellowship, which covers the program fee for the in-country component of a global immersion course. It was won by Sam Ritchie, from the FEMBA Class of 2019. Over the years, through the global immersion and international exchange courses as well as GAP and SMR, FEMBA and EMBA students have traveled to over 45 countries.

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Thursday, July 19 & Friday, July 20, 2018, A201, Collins Center, UCLA Anderson School of Management

BIT Conference 2018: The Services Revolution – Industrialization, Experience and Technology

All major world economies are dominated by services in terms of economic value (GDP) as well as the share of employment and wages. Over the last few years, technological changes have impacted service sectors in dramatic ways, in terms of industrialization, productivity changes, new and innovative services, and the creation of novel types of experiences. The 2018 Business and Information Technologies (BIT) Conference that took place at UCLA Anderson on July 19 and 20 addressed the services revolution that is occurring. this two-day academic-industry conference explored changes occurring for services at both the company and sector level through a number of keynote addresses as well as panel discussions on sectors including finance, entertainment, healthcare and on user experience. The conference which attracted over 60 attendees, including UCLA Anderson current students and alumni, brought together industry and academic perspectives on the restructuring of sectors, major trends that are visible, further changes and disruptions that are likely to occur over the next decade, and also addressed implications for industries, firms, jobs and wages. Among the topics that academicians and industry leaders discussed over this two-day conference, included how technology driven industrialization and innovation will determine winners in the evolving competitive landscape for services and the strategies that are emerging to cope with such rapid change. They also addressed academic approaches to these issues, including the methods, frameworks and analytics that are being developed to support best practices. The conference was complimentary to MBA students to provide them with the opportunity to learn and network with academicians and industry executives. The conference was organized by Uday Karmarkar, the L.A. Times Chair in Technology and Strategy and founder of BIT; Vandana Mangal, co-director of BIT; Enzo Baglieri, associate professor in management practice of operations and technology at SDA Bocconi School of Management; and the UCLA Anderson Easton Technology Management Center. The conference was co-sponsored by the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management. The CGM provides research support to UCLA Anderson professors on topics related to global management issues, international relations, or issues of global/regional cooperation and has been supporting the BIT global research project for over six years. Founded at UCLA Anderson, the project is an ambitious multi-year, multi-country, multi-part business information technology project that addresses the introduction, adoption and implementation of new information and communication technologies in business practice at various levels. The global research partner network currently includes 21 leading research institutions from 17 countries.

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2017 - 2018

 
Thursday, May 17, 2018, 4:30 PM, Anderson North Terrace

2018 International Food Festival - Because We Love, Celebrate and Value Diversity 

On May 17, 2018, students from the International Business Association (IBA) organized UCLA Anderson's International Food Festival (IFF). This annual tradition, supported by the Center for Global Management and Office of Diversity showcases, celebrates and embraces the international culture and diversity of UCLA Anderson through a universal form of expression - food. In place of Anderson Afternoons, the beautiful ambience of the North Terrace was spiced up as UCLA Anderson students from different countries gathered together and brought cuisines from all over the world for their classmates to enjoy. The celebration was attended by more than 250 students from across UCLA Anderson's various degree programs, faculty and staff of UCLA Anderson as well as friends and family.

The event featured 13 different cuisines from India, China, Thailand, Israel, Korea, Vietnam, Indonesia, Japan, Taiwan, Europe, Hawaii, and a fusion of Latin American food as well as Creole. Host students, representing many different student clubs at UCLA Anderson from around the world sourced authentic food from some of the best restaurants across Los Angeles. While a collection of international beer and wine to pair with the food was provided by the IBA, desserts from the European Business Association made the atmosphere a bit sweeter. Cultural diversity was also on display through international music and decoration of host tables. The Critics' Choice Award for best cuisine was judged and selected by UCLA Anderson students, faculty and staff. The decision was a difficult one to make. The four winners included the Black Business Association's seafood gumbo; the Latin American Business Association's fusion of Brazilian, Chilean and Mexican food, as well as food served by the Korea Business Student Association and the Greater China Business Association. IBA is grateful to Center for Global Management and the Office of Diversity for supporting the event and ensuring that UCLA Anderson remains and open and inclusive environment that embraces, celebrates and values diversity.In addition to the IBA, participating student clubs included: South Asian Business Association, Japan America Business Association, Greater China Business Association, Korean Business Student Association, European Business Association, Southeast Asia Business Association, Jewish Business Student Association, Anderson Eats, Latin American Business Association, Black Business Students Association.

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Wednesday, May 16, 2018, 11:45 AM - 12:45 PM, UCLA Anderson Executive Dining Room

Lunch with Sergio Foguel ('71)

On Wednesday, May 16, 2018 the Center for Global Management hosted a luncheon for students with Brazilian alumnus, Sergio Foguel ('71), board member of Odebrecht S.A., the holding company of the Odebrecht Group.  Since early 2016, he has been leading the Group's governance transformation efforts following Odebrecht's decision to collaborate with an investigation led by the Brazilian authorities known as Lava-Jato (or Car Wash) operation, which revealed one of the greatest corruption cases of all time involving several companies from Brazil and other countries.

Over lunch, Foguel who has been with Odebrecht for over 40 years shared personal stories and experiences with first and second year full-time MBA students. The luncheon provided a unique opportunity for students and members of the UCLA Anderson Latin American Business Association (LABA) from Brazil, Chile and Venezuela to meet a distinguished alumnus from the Latin American region in an informal and interactive setting. Foguel talked about his decision to come to UCLA in the late 1960s and his career trajectory since graduating in 1971, when it was known as the Graduate School of Management (GSM). He shared his thoughts and experiences as well as provided valuable perspectives and insights on a variety of topics. It was an honor and treat for students to engage with and learn from such a distinguished alumnus who was very proud to return to his alma mater and excited to engage with the next generation of global leaders from the region. The prior evening, Foguel served as the keynote speaker for UCLA Anderson's Corporate Governance Program where he discussed the rise and fall of the Brazilian construction giant that was behind venues for the 2016 Olympics, infrastructure for the 2014 World Cup, the metro system in Caracas, and other massive construction projects including dams and airport terminals. In the Q&A that followed with Senior Associate Dean Alfred E. Osborne, Jr., Foguel focused on the challenges currently facing Odebrecht Group and the initiatives designed to rebuild the company. His board responsibilities include leading the Compliance Committee, which aims to support the company's commitment to an ethical and transparent governance. In addition to his work with Odebrecht, Foguel has also consulted for business founders and leaders on governance strategy and has played an active role in the governance of social institutions. He has developed research and doctoral studies on organizational learning and development at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and Harvard University.  He is also the author and co-author of numerous books, book chapters and published articles focused on governance and organizational development.

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Monday, May 7, 2018, 9:00 AM - 3:30 PM, UCLA Faculty Center

Water in the Middle East and Africa: A Nexus of Cooperation and Conflict

On Monday, May 7, the international conference Water in the Middle East & Africa: A Nexus of Cooperation and Conflict Conference brought together scholars and practitioners to address one of the most critical challenges of our time: water security. In this era of climate change, ensuring sustainable and safe water supplies for the peoples of the Middle East and Africa, as well as other water-scarce parts of the globe, demands increasing attention and resources. It will take international will, collaboration across disciplines and cooperation across national and ethnic boundaries to create sustainable solutions and mitigate conflict. The conference, that took place at the UCLA Faculty Center, was organized around three broad topics - food security, health and environment, and the geopolitics of water - with an understanding that these issues overlap and intersect. Speakers brought a wide range of expertise and perspectives, from engineering, earth system science and urban planning to public health, law, international relations and conflict resolution. The conference was open to students and scholars, professionals from industry and non-profit organizations, government officials, and members of the general public interested in enriching their knowledge of the issues surrounding water scarcity and the innovative technology and policy solutions that will help to ensure a water-secure future. The keynote address on "Climate Change, Oceans and Human Health" was delivered by Rita Colwell, distinguished university professor, University of Maryland College Park, and adjunct professor, John Hopkins University whose interests are focused on global infectious diseases, water, and health. Colwell developed an international network to address emerging infectious diseases and water issues, including safe drinking water for both the developed and developing world, in collaboration with Safe Water Network, headquartered in New York City. The conference was organized by a variety of cross-campus partners, led by the UCLA Y&S Nazarian Center for Israeli Studies. Partners included the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management, UCLA Africa Studies Center, UCLA Center for the Study of International Migration, UCLA Center for Middle East Development, UCLA Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs and the Luskin Center for Innovation as well as the UCLA Water Resources Group and the UCLA Water Technology Research Center.

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Friday, May 4, 2018, 1:00 - 2:00 PM, UCLA Carnesale Commons, Palisades Ballroom

Political Risk: How Businesses and Organizations Can Anticipate Global Insecurity with Condoleezza Rice and Amy B. Zegart

On Friday, May 4, Condoleezza Rice and Amy B. Zegart visited UCLA for a conversation on their new book, Political Risk: How Businesses and Organizations Can Anticipate Global Insecurity.  The conversation was moderated by Kal Raustiala, professor of law and director of the UCLA Burkle Center for International Relations.  The Palisades Ballroom was packed full of engaged and globally minded students from across campus as well as professors, alumni and members of the general public who came to learn about managing 21st century political risk.  Based on Secretary Rice and Professor Zegart's most popular class at Stanford University, Political Risk is an invaluable study of risk management designed and scaled for multinational corporations or the next great start-up. This definitive book shows businesses how to thrive in rapidly changing and unpredictable global markets. Companies that want a competitive edge need to manage the political risks generated by a widening array of political actors, from heads of state to local officials, from Twitter to terrorists, from activists to hackers, even shareholders. and while today's threats are more complicated, the remedies do not have to be. They explained how political risk used to be fairly easy to understand and more often than not, involved dictators who suddenly seized foreign assets. But increasingly, it now comes from other actors such as people making videos on their cell phones and terrorists detonating truck bombs, and many more. As a result of new technologies, social activism isn't just for social activists anymore - bystanders can post videos that go viral and can cause significant political damage to companies. During the conversation, they opined on issues from Russia to North Korea and from human rights to cybersecurity. Before the public conversation, Condoleezza Rice and Amy Zegart joined a small group of students from across campus for an off-the-record conversation. Undergraduate, graduate and Ph.D. students majoring in business, political science, law, international development studies and global studies had a unique opportunity to ask questions about their most recent book, as well as aspects of their professional work. Former Secretary of State, Condoleezza Rice is the Denning Professor in Global Business and the Economy at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, a senior fellow on public policy at the Hoover Institution and a professor of political science at Stanford University. Rice also served as national security advisor under President George W. Bush. Amy B. Zegart is a senior fellow at the Hoover Institution and the Freeman Spogli Institute at Stanford University, where she co-directs the Center for International Security and Cooperation. She is also on the faculty of the Political Science department. The discussion was organized by the UCLA Burkle Center for International Relations, in collaboration with the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management,  UCLA Luskin School of Public AffairsUCLA Luskin Center for Innovation.

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Thursday, May 3, 2018, 8:30AM - 5:00 PM, Petersen Automotive Museum

The Future of the Automobile Conference

On Thursday, May 3, the Los Angeles World Affairs Council and Petersen Automotive Museum hosted the inaugural "Future of the Automobile Conference," at the Petersen Automotive Museum in west Los Angeles which looked at the most cutting-edge technologies in the transportation field and aired informed and sometimes provocative speculation on the future. Speakers discussed how society as a whole will be affected by autonomous and electric vehicles, wide-spread ride-sharing and even the possibility of flying taxis, and how drone deliveries and underground freight tunnels could change the way we get our "stuff". The conference brought together leading voices from car manufacturers, technology companies and regulatory agencies for a day-long series of talks and panel discussions on one of the biggest technological, economic and social changes facing the U.S. and the world in the coming years. Long a center of car culture, Los Angeles is emerging as the epicenter of new transportation development. The world is watching closely to see how we redesign our urban landscape around new electric, autonomous and ridesharing technologies. California will play a key role in creating the hardware and the software and establishing the regulatory framework that will underlie a dramatic shift in the transportation industry extending across America and around the world.  As a member of the LAWAC, the Center for Global Management supported 13 students from the full-time and fully employed MBA programs to attend the day-long conference which opened with a panel discussion on "Perspectives on the Future of the Automobile."  This was followed by an hour-long discussion between Franz von Holzhausen, the chief designer of Tesla, and Jay Ward, the creative director at Pixar who made all the Cars films. Von Holzhausen leads the team behind the iconic designs of the Tesla Model S, X and 3, as well as the Tesla Semi Truck and the new Tesla Roadster. In a moderated conversation, Von Holzhausen shared his inspirations for the unique vehicles and what we can expect to see out of Tesla in the future.  There were breakout sessions on cutting-edge technologies and the future of racing. These were followed by sessions on LA City planners design for AV's and the future of trucking. After lunch, there was a plenary discussion on "Detroit versus Silicon Valley: Who Prevails and When?"  This panel delivered a general consensus that I will be at least 25 years before today's cars disappear and a completely new market emerges dominated by autonomous vehicle s and ridesharing models.  This was followed by breakout sessions on AV technology and design as well as on ethics and regulations. The final set of sessions looked at the future of cars around the world: From Beijing to Dubai and London to LA and AV's economic future. The conference concluded with a rooftop reception. The Future of the Automobile Conference, brought together immersive and inspirational talks, demos, test drives and exhibitions to give a glimpse into the future of our mobility. The conference explored the brave new world of the personal transportation revolution that is set to transform every city in the world. The overall takeaway? Things are changing fast, humans will want to maintain some degree of control throughout, and whatever happens China is already planning to be a major part of it.

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Wednesday, May 2 - Friday, May 4, 2018, Switzerland

Ilia Gorodnichev Wins Opportunity to Share his Voice and Opinion with some of the World's Most Influential luminaries at the St. Gallen Symposium

In May, the University of St. Gallen, Switzerland hosted the 48th St. Gallen Symposium  where 600 Leaders of Today joined 200 Leaders of  Tomorrow from May 2-4,  2018 to debate "Beyond the end of work."  Each year, St. Gallen's International Students' Committee (ISC) chooses an annual topic from the realms of management, politics and society. The aim is to capture and condense the most relevant and intergenerational debates currently shaping the world around us and making them center-stage at the St. Gallen Symposium in May.  Since its inception in 1969, the St. Gallen Symposium has grown to become the world's premier opportunity for debate between generations with a clear focus on management, politics and civil society. St. Gallen provides an intimate setting where speakers, topic leaders, "Leaders of Tomorrow and Today" get to talk to each other on equal footing, informally and in a focused, productive environment.

 The student-organized conference, provides an opportunity for students from top schools from around the world to create an impact, discuss their ideas with the global elite and enjoy an all-expenses paid trip to Switzerland. The Symposium includes "The St. Gallen Wings of Excellence Award" which is a student essay competition giving graduate and postgraduate students the extraordinary opportunity to share their voice and opinion with some of the world's most influential luminaries.  The theme of the 2018 essay was "Robots are coming for your job. How do you augment yourself to stay economically relevant?"  Selected students qualified as one of 200 "Leaders of Tomorrow" by competing for the 30th St. Gallen Wings of Excellence Award. Ilia Gorodnichev, a student in the FEMBA class of 2018 who will graduate in June with the Global Management specialization qualified as a "Leader of Tomorrow" to attend the 48th St. Gallen Symposium from almost 1,300 contestants, representing 350 universities and more than 100 nationalities making the 2018 St. Gallen Wings of Excellence Award the most competitive so far. As a Leader of Tomorrow, Ilia joined the debate on "Beyond the end of work" and engaged with 600 top-level decision makers from business, politics and society as well as with 200 of the world's brightest and most promising young minds.  Leaders of Tomorrow are a carefully selected, global community of the most promising young talents. Each year, 200 academics, politicians, entrepreneurs and professionals around 30 years or younger are invited to challenge, debate, and inspire at the conference. By questioning the status quo and representing the voices of the next generation, the Leaders of Tomorrow are at the very heart of the St. Gallen Symposium. They qualify either through the global essay competition aimed at graduate students, or attend based on their professional or academic merit through a strict hand-selection process. After the symposium, they join St. Gallen's Leaders of Tomorrow Alumni Community counting over 2000 members worldwide. The three days included sessions on topics ranging from the IoT and its impact on society to humanity's to-do list for a better future; and from the future of transport, to robotics to workplaces that work - a call for diversity.  Jeremy Rifkin, president, Foundation on Economic Trends discussed the smart third industrial revolution and the future of work, which was followed by a conversation with Lord Griffiths of Fforestfach, Goldman Sachs International. During the evening of May 3, the top five contributors to the St. Gallen Wings of Excellence Award pitched their ideas to an expert panel. The keynote address that evening was delivered by Steve Forbes, chairman and editor-in chief, Forbes Media. In past years, the Symposium has welcomed renowned leaders such as Jack Ma, founder and chief executive officer of Alibaba.com, Kofi Annan, seventh Secretary-General of the United Nations, Dr Tony Tan Keng Yam, President of the Republic of Singapore and Christine Lagarde, managing director of the International Monetary Fund.   During his time in Switzerland, Ilia made friends with filmmakers, doctors, journalists, future consultants, non-profit community leaders, venture capitalists, CEOs of start-ups, a current member of parliament, a future foreign policy State Department representative, and many others from various walks-of-life. Ilia has become part of this vibrant global community, where members stay connected, build long-lasting friendships and support each other on endeavors that make a difference.

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Thursday, April 26, 2018, UCLA Anderson School of Management

Students from UCLA Anderson Network with Executive Master in Finance Students from INCAE Business School, Costa Rica

During the late afternoon on Thursday, April 26, full-time and fully employed MBA students from UCLA Anderson's Latin American Business Association, as well as students from the Master of Financial Engineering and Ph.D. programs met and networked with students from the Executive Master in Finance program, INCAE Business School, Costa Rica. The Center for Global Management hosted the EMiF students at UCLA for a global management seminar on "Dimensions of Finance: Financial Engineering and Investment Banking." The students, from various countries in Central and Latin America, holding management positions in various organizations and sectors visited UCLA for a week to gain valuable global experience and insights from UCLA Anderson finance and economics professors. The five-day seminar focused on current academic research and business application around topics such as real options, private equity, venture capital securities, valuation under conditions of major macroeconomic upheaval, cryptography, blockchain applications and big data. Professor Bhagwan Chowdhry served as the faculty director for the seminar. He also taught during the week, together with Professors Mark Garmaise and Sebastian Edwards.

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Friday, April 20, 2018 11:30AM - 7:30PM, UCLA Anderson School of Management

2018 Wilbur K. Woo Greater China Business Conference: A New Era of Economic Ties and Bilateral Investment for the United States and China

On Friday, April 20, 2018, the Center for Global Management hosted the 12th annual Wilbur K. Woo Greater China Business Conference at the UCLA Anderson School of Management. The 2018 Conference, titled, "A New Era of Economic Ties and Bilateral Investment for the United States and China," brought together successful U.S. and Chinese leaders, investors and influencers from a variety of industries and sectors who discussed the importance of innovation, collaboration and new technology, as well as diversification and localization.

 Speakers, including UCLA and UCLA Anderson alumni and faculty members addressed an audience of around 400 attendees from the UCLA as well as business, investment and governmental communities. They shared their insights on emerging trends, identified bright spots for future investment and discussed new and creative investment strategies and partnerships to take advantage of this new era of economic ties and bilateral investment between the world's two superpowers. Following a lunchtime career panel discussion for UCLA students, the conference was officially opened by UCLA Anderson's Dean Judy Olian; Michael Woo, Los Angeles' first Asian-American city councilman, son of conference founder Wilbur K. Woo (B.A. '42) and dean of Cal Poly Pomona College of Environmental Design; and Pin Tai, CEO and president of Cathay Bancorp and Cathay Bank, a platinum sponsor of the 2018 conference. This was followed by a macro overview and business perspective delivered by William Yu, economist with the UCLA Anderson Forecast; Feng An, founder and executive director of the Innovation Center for Energy and Transportation (iCET), U.S.-China Cleantech Center (UCCTC); moderated by Seamus Jiang, managing director and co-leader for China-U.S. cross-border deals at PwC, also a platinum sponsor of this year's conference. Plenary and concurrent sessions throughout the afternoon focused on innovation, collaboration and advanced technology and transformation, diversification and localization - new and important investment strategies and partnerships. A range of topics were addressed including discussions on advanced technologies; real estate; media and entertainment; entrepreneurship, investment and growth strategies; as well as financial risk, monetary policy and SOE reforms. Before the conference, the Center for Global Management hosted a private dinner for the speakers, moderators and student conference directors in the executive dining room. Following the conference, a networking event was held in the same room which provided wonderful opportunities for the audience and speakers to continue conversations The conference featured speakers from Alibaba Cloud; BAM Ventures; BYD Motors Inc.; Cathay Bank; China International Capital Corporation; Cox Castle & Nicholson LLP; Good Hope USA; iFLYTEK North America; Landsea Homes; Live Nation; Loop Media; Manatt, Phelps & Phillips LLP; OWNZONES Media Network; PwC; SCG America Group; Solaris Paper, Inc.; Suning USA; TP-Link North America, Inc.; UpHonest Capital; U.S.-China Cleantech Center (UCCTC); and the UCLA Anderson School of Management. Born in China in 1916, the late Wilbur K. Woo (B.A. '42) received his bachelor's degree in business administration from UCLA. Wilbur K. Woo, vice chairman emeritus of Cathay Bank and Cathay Bancorp, was known for his decades of leadership in the Chinese-American community. Together with his wife, Beth, they endowed the Wilbur K. Woo Greater China Business Conference at UCLA Anderson with the goal of promoting understanding of the economic ties between the Greater China region and United States. They established the conference to show gratitude for the training Wilbur received at his alma mater many years ago. The 2018 Wilbur K. Woo Greater China Business Conference was organized by the Center for Global Management at the UCLA Anderson School of Management, in association with UCLA Anderson's Greater China Business Association (GCBA) and UCLA's Chinese Students and Scholars Association (CSSA). It was sponsored by PwC and Cathay Bank at the platinum level. Landsea Homes and Cox Castle Nicholson were silver and bronze sponsors, respectively. The China General Chamber of Commerce - Los Angeles, UCLA Asia Pacific Center and UCLA Center for Chinese Studies were supporting organizations. 

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Thursday, April 19, 2018, 4:30 PM, Anderson Afternoon, North Terrace

Celebrating Israeli Independence Day at UCLA Anderson

The Jewish Business Student Association (JBSA), with support from the Center for Global Management and Anderson Student Council, organized an Israeli-themed Anderson Afternoon on Thursday, April 20 to celebrate Israel's Independence Day. Independence Day commemorates the Israeli Declaration of Independence on May 14, 1948, making this year the 70thanniversary of the establishment of a Jewish state in the land of Israel. JBSA's mission is to build and sustain a community that enhances the professional, social and educational experience of Jewish students at UCLA Anderson. Given the significant interest among UCLA Anderson students in learning more about Israel, as demonstrated by the participation in the annual Israel trek, the JBSA wanted to share more about Israel's unique history and culture and make it accessible to the wider UCLA Anderson community. Students enjoyed Israeli food and music, while students who participated on the Israel trek shared their recent experiences in Israel with other students who were interested in learning more about the history of the country and the importance of Independence Day. 

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Sunday, March 25 - Saturday, March 31, 2018, Brazil

39 Students Visit Sao Paulo and Rio for the CGM's Global Immersion Course "Risks and Rewards in Emerging Markets: Lessons from Brazil," led by Economist Ed Leamer, Chauncey J. Medberry Professor of Management

During spring break, 39 students from UCLA Anderson's executive, fully employed and full-time MBA programs visited Brazil for one of the three global immersion courses, run by the CGM during this timeframe. The focus of the course was "Risks and Rewards in Emerging Markets: Lessons from Brazil." It was led by Economist Ed Leamer, Chauncey J. Medberry Professor of Management and was the fifth global immersion course centered on Brazil. The course focused on three areas that one should consider when investing in emerging markets: disappointing economic growth; national indebtedness and exchange rate volatility; and governance that does more harm than good. As part of the course, students identified an investment opportunity in Brazil to enable them to offer advice regarding the attractiveness of the investment and identify the best time to make the commitment. During the week in-country, students examined the major industries in Brazil to gain an in-depth understanding of the country's businesses and the economic and social cultures in which they operate.

Insper, UCLA Anderson's institutional partner in Brazil hosted the inaugural morning session on their campus. Insper's president, Marcos Lisboa who from 2003 to 2005 served as the economic policy secretary for the Finance Ministry addressed the group and discussed the current social-economic and political landscape in Brazil. This was followed by a presentation from Alexandre Schwartsman, a Brazilian economist and former director of international affairs at the Central Bank of Brazil. Students also learned more about Insper as an institution. In Sao Paulo, students visited Natura, a Brazilian manufacturer and marketer of beauty products, household, and personal care. The company which recently acquired Britain's Body Shop is known for its commitment to sustainability and being an eco-friendly company. They heard from Marcelo Behar, the company's corporate affairs director and had the unique opportunity for meet and hear from Guilherme Leal, a Brazilian businessman and social entrepreneur and one of the founders of Natura and co-chairman of the board of directors. Students also toured Natura's beautiful distribution center, considered the most advanced and inclusive of Latin America.   The next day, students visited Embraer, the third largest producer of civil aircraft, after Airbus and Boeing at its headquarters in São José dos Campos. They toured the company's state of the art manufacturing facility, including its systems installations and assembly and painting areas. They heard from John Slattery, president and CEO of Embraer's commercial aviation and Sandro Giovanni Valeri, head of corporate innovation. Students learned about Embraer's history, advantage and, challenges as well as its technology and innovation. They visited Creditas to learn from its founder and CEO, Sergio Furio about how the Brazilian start up is revolutionizing credit in the world's third largest lending market; Nubank, one of Brazil's first financial technology-driven start-ups to hear about disruption and the impact of technology in the banking system; and Korin to understand agribusiness and new trends of food consumption in the country. In Sao Paulo, students also had the opportunity to share their investment ideas and receive advice and guidance from distinguished UCLA Anderson alumni with expertise across various sectors, including financial markets, venture capital, consulting and entrepreneurship. They discussed their ideas with Alceu Lima ('92), investor and owner and former president of Barclays, Brazil; Alex Dias ('00), senior partner at Victoria Capital Partnersand also the Brazil alumni president; Alex Gouvea ('90), partner at McKinsey & Co. and Ricardo Noda ('84), founder and managing partner of Plastrom Technologia Ltd. On the Tuesday evening, the CGM also organized a presentation and discussion with Professor Leamer on "What Have We Learned About the U.S. Economy By Studying Brazil?" A networking reception followed the discussion. UCLA Anderson alumni and recently admitted students joined the evening of conversation and networking at the Intercontinental São Paulo. In Rio de Janeiro, students visited well-known and influential companies such as Globo Media, the largest TV network in Brazil where they toured Globo Productions, the largest TV production center in Latin America. They visited Petrobras, the Brazilian state-run energy company engaged in the exploration of oil and gas and BNDES, the Brazilian Development Bank and one of the largest development banks in the world that has played a key role in stimulating expansion of industry, commerce, agriculture and infrastructure in the country since its foundation in 1952.  Students also learned about the effect and impact of social businesses in Brazilian communities from Henrique Drumond, CEO and founder of Insolar, a social business that promotes democratization of access to solar energy in the country through installation of solar panels in low-income communities. The closing session was delivered by Evodio Kaltenecher, who provided a terrific wrap up to the week and tied together the visits, speakers and topics and highlighted their impact and influence in Brazil and the importance of innovation for the country and the Latin America region.During their time in Brazil, students also got to experience some of the sites, culture and cuisine. They enjoyed a city tour of Sao Paulo and enjoyed some of the highlights of the city, including Mercado Municipal to taste local cuisine and Batman Alley - a popular destination because of the dense concentration of graffiti that lines the streets. At the opening dinner in Sao Paulo, they enjoyed traditional Brazilian cuisine at Capim Santo. In Rio, they learned about the Tijuca Rainforest, a tropical rainforest in the city that is claimed to be the world's largest urban forest and its importance as a regulator of the city climate and enjoyed a jeep tour of the rainforest. The week concluded with a city tour of Rio and a visit to Christ the Redeemer Statueatop the peak of the Corcovado mountain, one of the largest Art Deco statues of Jesus Christ that overlooks the city where they enjoyed the view of the city and experienced one of Brazil's most well-known symbols of Christianity.

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Sunday, March 25 - Saturday, March 31, 2018, China

40 Students Visit Beijing and Shanghai for the CGM's Global Immersion Course "Business in an Ever-Evolving China: From Emerging Economy to Global Power," led by Eric Sussman, Adjunct Professor of Accounting and Real Estate

During spring break, 40 students from UCLA Anderson's executive, fully employed and full-time MBA programs as well as the UCLA-NUS global executive program visited China for one of the three global immersion courses, run by the CGM during this timeframe. The focus of the course was "Business in an Ever-Evolving China: From Emerging Economy to Global Power." It was led by Eric Sussman, adjunct professor of accounting and real estate, who has led many global immersion courses around the world. This was the sixth global immersion course to focus on and visit China. What will doing business in and with China look like going forward, as the country transitions from an investment- to a consumption driven economy?  What opportunities and risks exist for foreign businesses and entrepreneurs seeking to do business in and with China?  How about Chinese companies seeking to expand internationally and go global?  What role(s) will government - local, provincial, and national - play in the shifting landscape?  What will the next decade bring for this dynamic global power?  The course helped to answer these questions through on-campus lectures as well as a series of site visits in Shanghai, China's financial capital and Beijing, one of the great ancient capitals of China. The on-campus classes reviewed the economic, political, and social issues that China has faced historically and is facing today.  In-country, site visits and speakers focused on elements of economic activity and policy, capital markets, and real estate investment and sustainable development. Through these visits and related analyses, students explored policies and initiatives to balance accelerated economic growth with environmental and distributional concerns in the context of an emerging global power.

 The inaugural morning sessions in Beijing included presentations and conversations with distinguished and accomplished UCLA alumni from the technology sector. James Ding (MLS '90), an independent board member at Baidu and managing director of GSR Ventures, discussed investing and entrepreneurship in China and the VC environment; while Derek Chen (MS '00), former president of LinkedIn China and now the executive chairman at Danke Apartment, a leading internet enabled apartment management startup in China, addressed the opportunities and challenges of starting-up in China and shared details of his professional journey with the group. During the week, students had many opportunities to hear and learn from many UCLA and UCLA Anderson alumni in both cities. In Shanghai, Ken Wu (B.A. '99), managing director at Concord VC Group and former general manager at SAIC Motors, talked about state owned enterprises, their role - past and present. He also facilitated a visit and factory tour to SAIC - GM, a joint venture between General Motors Company and SAIC Motor that manufactures and sells Chevrolet, Buick, Cadillac, and Opel brand automobiles in mainland China. Min Zhou, an alumna from the FEMBA class of 2002 and CEO of China Materialia, moderated a discussion at XNode's co-working space with a panel of local entrepreneurs focused on China's start-up environment and navigating the way through intense competition. China Materialia started in 2010 as an Open Innovation (OI) advisory company. Over the years, the company has worked with many multinational companies to build open innovation networks in China, including research institutions, start-up companies, incubators and accelerators. Students also visited well-known companies such as Lenovo where they learned about the company's history, operations, products and services as well as its global strategy and enjoyed a tour of its brand experience center. In Shanghai, they visited Tencent, a Chinese multinational and leading provider of internet value added services and developer of the popular Chinese app WeChat, where they heard from alumna Jenna Gu ('16), associate director of corporate strategy. Students also visited Beckett Asia Pacific which produces electronic components and provides sourcing and engineering solutions for the international HVAC industry to understand more about the new era of manufacturing in China and governmental reforms. They visited VIPKID, a leading Chinese online education firm and heard from James Leo, the company's chief of staff. VIPKID offers an American elementary education experience to Chinese students aged 4-12. Elliot Papageorgiou, head of intellectual property at Clyde and Co,. discussed the legal framework of intellectual property laws and during a visit to Shui On Land, David Wong, head of research and strategic planning addressed real estate in Shanghai and in China more broadly. Students also engaged with panelists who focused on and addressed the topics of sustainability and contemporary social issues.  Bob Theleen, CEO of ChinaVest and former chairman of AmCham China provided a perfect wrap up to the week with a discussion on the business environment in China, two decades of development and shared his perspectives and experiences in China and the changes and transitions that he has witnessed over the years. In both Beijing and Shanghai, students met and networked with alumni in the evenings. In Beijing, around 10 Anderson alumni from various degree programs enjoyed a dinner with the students at Lei Garden restaurant. In Shanghai, the alumni chapter president, Alok Somani ('93) coordinated a panel of alumni which included Albert Eng ('96) from PayPal, Longliang Lin ('11) from Starbucks, Josie Shen ('93) from CSV Capital Partners and Diana Lu ('09). Professor Sussman moderated a discussion on what UCLA Anderson has meant to them, the impact of their experience and their career trajectory post UCLA Anderson. Professor Sussman also shared his thoughts and conclusions on the week's topic of Business in an Ever-Evolving China: From Emerging Economy to Global Power." A networking reception followed at the Naked Hub, a shared co-working space near People's Square. Over 20 alumni and admitted students enjoyed a memorable evening talking and networking with current students and faculty. It was wonderful to see the engagement and strength of the UCLA alumni network in China. Students also got to experience some of the culture, taste Peking Duck and traditional Yunnan cuisine and visit some well-known sights of China. They enjoyed a guided tour of Beijing where they visited the Forbidden City and Tiananmen Square and took the high-speed train from Beijing to Shanghai where they absorbed the sacred majesty of the Jade Buddha temple, strolled amid the botanical beauty of the Yuyuan Gardens and visited the People's park.  The week concluded with a farewell dinner at Lost Heaven, a restaurant on the Bund.

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Saturday, March 24 - Friday, March 30, 2018, Israel

40 Students Visit Israel for the CGM's Global Immersion Course "Start Up Nation: Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Sustainability," led by Stuart Gabriel, Arden Realty Chair and Professor of Finance

During spring break, 40 students from UCLA Anderson's executive, fully employed and full-time MBA programs visited Israel for one of CGM's three global immersion courses that traveled during spring. The focus of the course was "Start Up Nation: Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Sustainability," led by Stuart Gabriel, Arden Realty Chair and professor of finance. This was the fourth global immersion course to focus on and visit Israel.  During the week, students explored the agglomeration of entrepreneurial business innovation in Israel. Site visits focused on venture capital, entrepreneurial activity and technological innovation, related to social entrepreneurship, and the Israeli contextual eco-system - both in Tel Aviv and also Jerusalem.

The inaugural speaker was Erez Frankel Rubner from Start-Up Nation Central who provided an excellent overview of Israel's start-up ecosystem and how the country cultivates a very active tech ecosystem and attracts more VC firms per capita than any other country in the world. While Israel's turbulent geo-political situation might suggest that investors would shy away from Israel and investor confidence would be low, investors are not afraid when it comes to investing in Israel's tech sector. Students were provided with a very good understanding of Israel's dynamic investment ecosystem and its VC environment from Omry Ben David, a partner at Viola Ventures, a venture capital firm that invests in Israeli or Israeli-related early stage companies. He shared his perspective on the importance of the Israeli hi-tech industry and on how venture capital is looking at Israel and what the real opportunities are. Students visited well-known companies, including OrCam, a spinoff from MobilEye to learn about pioneering in wearable vision technology and Check Point Software Technologies to understand challenges for security companies today and how cybersecurity is changing with the move to the cloud. They also learned about the story of Waze and its phases of growth and product development. Other visits included Wix.com, a cloud-based web development platform where students learned about cost efficiency and customization in the digital era and Teva Pharmaceuticals, the largest generic drug manufacturer in the world to understand how Teva is bridging scientific breakthrough and commercial success in pharma. The group visited Wolfson Medical Center and heard about modern solutions for the best healthcare and were provided an overview of Save a Child's Heart, an Israeli-based international non-profit organization, whose goal is to improve the health and welfare of all children, regardless of the child's nationality, religion, color, gender or financial situation. SACH also trains medical professionals in life-changing skills to take back to their home country. After hearing about the amazing work of SACH, students visited the house where the child patients stay before and after surgery and played with the children who varied in age. Later, they visited Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center (Ichilov) to learn about advances in technology with in vitro fertilization; and Syqe Medical to understand how the company is transforming cannabis into a mainstream drug and implementing cutting edge technologies. Students also visited Kibbutz Magal, and learned about the foundations of communal life. Since the 1970s, the kibbutz has been the co-owner of Netafim, now an international corporation for irrigation and dripping products. Since the late 1990s, the kibbutz has also been undergoing privatization and today it is almost completely privatized and considered economically viable. The students received a tour of the kibbutz and visited its irrigation and agro technology research and training park to see the family drip irrigation that meets the biggest needs of the smallest smallholders. UCLA Anderson alumnus Elad Shmulevich (B.A. '05, '07), who serves as the global quality & operations excellence director for global operations at Netafim also joined and talked with the group about the company and the Kibbutz. During the week, there were also a number of panel discussions that provided opportunities for students to learn about the integration of minorities through hi-tech and innovation. Students heard from leading Arab tech entrepreneurs in the country about social enterprises and the spread of the Start-Up Nation and entrepreneurship ecosystem to the Arab sections. Bhagwan Chowdhry, professor of finance who also joined the program, moderated a panel discussion at SOSA Jaffa, a global corporate hub focused on bringing together startups and global corporations, on Israel's booming Fintech - a discussion on blockchain and cryptocurrency. Panelists shared their views and investment thoughts on cryptocurrency and bitcoin and discussed the different kinds of tokens, smart contracts and software being written in blockchain. Later in the week, the group visited the JVP Media Quarter in Jerusalem, to continue their learning on investment trends in the Israeli VC market. JVP is one of Israel's largest and most active venture capital funds that focuses its investment in the spaces of digital media, storage and Infrastructure, enterprise software and cyber security. They also heard from Rachel Shaul, the CEO of Presentense, a leading non-profit focused on creating social impact through entrepreneurship. In Tel Aviv, students also had the opportunity to meet and network with round 25 UCLA Anderson alumni and recently admitted students who gathered at the Carlton Hotel on the Sunday evening. Guests were welcomed by Arik Waldman ('10), alumni chapter vice president who introduced UCLA Anderson's Dean, Judy Olian who was in Tel Aviv at the same time following meetings in Europe. Waldman was joined by alumni chapter president Yoav Suesskind ('02). Giora Romm ('82), former deputy commander of the Israeli Air Force, Israel's former military attaché in the United States and the current director of the Civil Aviation Authority of Israel also joined the evening. Dean Olian delivered an informal and brief update on the school, shared recent accomplishments and new initiatives and described her personal connection with Israel. She also explained that the number of admitted students from the applicant pool in Israel this year was very high and impressive. Professor Gabriel said a few words about the UCLA Anderson-Israel connection, before introducing Professor Bhagwan Chowdhry who delivered an excellent presentation on block chain and crypto-currency. Many in the audience were fascinated with this topic. Following the presentations, the alumni and students continued to mingle well into the evening. Yuval, the local tour guide provided excellent commentary throughout the week and was an encyclopedia of knowledge who shared many facts and figures to help everyone better understand Israel, its history as well as the country's economic and political complexities and realities. Students also got to experience some of the culture and historical sites of Israel, including a walking tour of the ancient city of Neve Tzedek and the Old Port City of Jaffa. Here, they enjoyed an Israeli dinner at Old Jaffa Port's Old Man and the Sea and were joined by Ophir Perelson ('88) and his wife, Glenda. Later in the week, Yuval led the students on a tour of the Old City to the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. They walked along the Via Dolorosa, a street within the Old City of Jerusalem, believed to be the path that Jesus walked on the way to his crucifixion, and a celebrated place of Christian pilgrimage and continued walking through the Old City and proceeded to The Western Wall. Students also visited Castel winery visit, a beautiful family owned winery in the Jerusalem corridor in the Judean hills and learned about the family wine-making tradition. On the last day, they visited Yad Vashem, the Holocaust Memorial Museum, Israel's official memorial to the six million Jewish victims of the Holocaust, which was an extremely important visit to better understand the context and history of Israel. Chen Chadash and Elad Azoulay, both students from the FT MBA class of 2018 from Israel served as the teaching assistants for the course and also joined in country where they shared their cultural knowledge and experience- their presence added significantly to the learning experience. The program concluded with a farewell dinner at the Hasadna Culinary Workshop, one of the best restaurants in Jerusalem.  The next day was Good Friday and the beginning of Passover. A number of students participated in the optional day trip to Masada, the ancient fortification in the southern area of Israel, located on the eastern edge of the Judaean Desert, overlooking the Dead Sea and took a dip in the Dead Sea. Some students stayed on to enjoy additional time in Tel Aviv and Jerusalem and others headed to Jordan and Egypt. It was an extremely memorable, meaningful and impactful week. During the same timeframe, the UCLA Anderson Jewish Business Student Association organized the annual student-led trek to Israel, a tradition that began in 2014.  Over 80 students from the FTMBA and FEMBA programs, together with significant others spent eight days learning about Israel's history, culture and modern-day society - they toured around the country visiting sites of historic and cultural significance including Jerusalem, the Golan Heights, and the Dead Sea.

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Thursday, March 15, 2018, 7:00 PM-9:00 PM, Wolfgang Puck, UCLA Ackerman Union

UCLA Anderson Latin American Business Association (LABA) Organizes Mixer for LABA Students to Network with LABA Alumni, Living and Working in Los Angeles

On Thursday, March 15, LABA leaders organized an evening of networking and camaraderie at the Wolfgang Puck restaurant located in the heart of the UCLA campus. The 2018 LABA Alumni Mixer, organized by LABA and sponsored by the Center for Global Management and Anderson Student Association, gathered together around 50 first and second year full-time MBA students and members of the UCLA Anderson Latin-American alumni community who live and work in the greater Los Angeles area. The goal of the event was to help create a bond that goes beyond the two or three years that students spend at UCLA Anderson and promote lifelong connections and friendships to assist with networking, recruiting and increasing school engagement. Around 20 alumni attended who work at companies such as SpaceX, Epson, Hulu, Fox, Sony Pictures Network, Netflix, Mattel, among many other well-known companies. The evening provided a terrific forum for students to learn from alumni about these companies as employers and possible recruiting opportunities. The event also provided an opportunity for alumni to familiarize themselves with both the CGM and LABA-led programming such as the Latin American Business Conference and various speaker series and panel discussions. It also reinforced the commitment of “Sharing Success” between alumni and the younger generations, promoting collaboration and potentially generating future partnerships and business opportunities too. We hope this will become an annual tradition for bringing together current and former LABA members.

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Monday, March 12, 2018, 7:30 PM

Students from CGM’s Spanish Language & Culture for Business I Class Practice Linguistic Skills at a Communal Dinner at La Paella Restaurant

Language courses have been offered for more than 20 years. A beginning level elective course, “Spanish Language and Culture for Business,” is offered through the CGM and designed specifically for business students. The course is available to FEMBA, EMBA and full-time MBA students in the winter quarter, and it also has a continuation class in the spring quarter. Typically, more than 40 students enroll between both quarters. The objective of the course is to familiarize students with Spanish language and culture at a practical level, focusing mainly on communicative proficiency, basic grammar and common vocabulary appropriate to daily scenarios, including informal and professional business settings. For example, students learn how to ask for directions in an unknown city, buy a plane ticket and get around in an airport, order food and drinks in a restaurant, and make hotel reservations. The students also learn how to talk about basic work-related experiences, skills and duties, how to negotiate, introduce friends, and chat about family, housing, and food.

Given the strong correlation between language and culture, the course also introduces students to basic cultural understanding and business etiquette and provides role-playing opportunities and conversational examples for a variety of situations. The course is taught by Adrián Collado, a native speaker from Spain and a Ph.D. candidate in UCLA’s Department of Spanish and Portuguese, where he teaches classes in Spanish language, literature and culture. As an addition to teaching, he also organizes the UCLA Latin American and Iberian Film Festival, to which students are invited and encouraged to attend. The Festival is a phenomenal opportunity for students not only to improve their language skills but also to enrich their cultural knowledge and understanding. On the last week of the quarter, the class usually goes out to explore the Hispanic local cuisine. At the end of the winter quarter, seventy-five percent of the class went out for dinner at La Paella, one of the oldest, and finest, Spanish restaurants in Los Angeles. Students were able to try different tapas and paellas. Students enjoyed a feast of jamón serrano, champiñones con chorizo, pulpo, tortilla española, arròs negre y paella marinera, providing them the opportunity to practice and demonstrate their linguistic skill. It was the perfect way to end a wonderful quarter of Spanish learning!

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Monday, March 5, 2018, 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Dean's Conference Room

Lunch Series with CGM Advisory Board Member Brent Nelson Smith (’86), Co-Founder and Managing Partner LevelOne Capital Limited; Former Global Group Head of Corporate & Investment Banking DBS Bank Ltd. on “Global Investment Banking and Entrepreneurship.”

On Monday, March 5, 2018 the Center for Global Management hosted a brown bag luncheon with advisory board member, Brent Smith (’86). Based in southeast Asian, since 2008, he has served as co-founder and managing partner of LevelOne Capital, a Pan-Asian investment and advisory firm, where he has specialized in startup and mezzanine opportunities in emerging markets with a focus on southeast Asia, particularly Vietnam and Singapore. Smith formerly served as global head of corporate and investment banking for DBS Bank, a Singaporean multinational bank and financial services company after spending almost 15 years with JPMorgan & Co., where he was a managing director in the investment banking and mergers and acquisitions groups, completing assignments in New York, Melbourne, Sydney, Singapore and San Francisco. First and second year students from the full-time and fully employed MBA programs, including CGM mentees, members of the Investment Finance Association, Entrepreneur Association and Southeast Asian Business Association and students interested in global management gathered to hear his career trajectory since graduating from UCLA Anderson in 1986. The luncheon provided an opportunity for interested MBA students to meet Smith in an informal and interactive setting and hear his thoughts, insights and experiences as a global investment banker, investor, entrepreneur and strategic advisor. He discussed his career trajectory since graduating from UCLA Anderson as well and his experience living, working and doing business internationally, and the importance of global and diverse perspectives, cultural sensitivity and international experiences in today’s environment. He shared many personal stories and experiences with the students as well as lessons learned throughout his successful global career of over 30 years across Asia, the United States and Australia, providing invaluable guidance to students and describing his transition from investment banker to CFO to venture capitalist to entrepreneur. Smith discussed the importance of peer to peer networking and explained how past experiences and skills acquired in the early days of his career have helped him understand different industries in different countries as well as comprehend various management structures which have all been valuable both in his entrepreneurial ventures today as well as in his role as a board director. He also touched on the importance of looking, listening, learning and self analyzing and described some tough lessons that he has experienced. The lunch was supported by the Investment Finance Association, the Entrepreneur Association and Southeast Asian Business Association.

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Friday, March 2, 2018, 1:00 PM – 5:30 PM, Korn Convocation Hall

2018 Latin American Business Conference, LATIN AMERICA: FROM OPPORTUNITY TO ACTION

On Friday, March 2, prominent and influential leaders from both the private and public sector, including distinguished UCLA and UCLA Anderson alumni gathered together with an audience of over 300 students, academics and members of the local business community in Korn Convocation Hall to address the opportunities and concerns of the region and suggest calls to action from its business and political decision-makers. In addition to sharing their experiences, insights and economic and political forecasts, they discussed ideas about what is needed to move to action as Latin America considers its future and rethinks traditional industries and systems.

The conference which opened with a macro-overview of the region by Professor Sebastian Edwards, Henry Ford II Chair in International Management and faculty director of Center for Global Management, an organizer and sponsor of the conference, explored business and investment opportunities for the region as well as the industries and sectors that are ripe for innovation and positive disruption. Speakers examined how Latin America is well positioned to foster stronger and more sustainable economic growth, stimulate innovation and technology advancement, leverage trade opportunities with the United States and plan for a brighter future. There were discussions on the region’s economic, trade, political and social prospects, with panels focused on innovation and technology for financial transformation, clean energy as a path toward sustainable and inclusive growth, and Mexico’s views on the current NAFTA Renegotiations.

Panelists included: Cate Ambrose, president and executive director, Latin American Private Equity and Venture Capital Association (LAVCA); Lee Bailey, chairman of the board, SolarReserve and managing director, Ascent Holdings LLC; Carlos Barrera, chief executive officer, Atlas Renewable Energy and former managing director for Latin America, SunEdison; Walter Bayly, chief executive officer, Banco de Credito del Peru (BCP) and chief operating officer, Credicorp; Richard Brent, chief executive officer, Louroe Electronics; Carlos Cesarman Kolteniuk, chief financial officer and director of investor relations, Promotora y Operadora de Infraestructura S.A.B. de C.V. (PINFRA); Bryan Early, special advisor to Commissioner McAllister and lead advisor to Chair Weisenmiller on Mexico, California Energy Commission; Veronica Elizondo, global head of strategic planning, Sigma Alimentos (Grupo Alfa); Marcelo Sada, chief executive officer and co-founder, Source Logistics; and Eduardo Urdapilleta (M.A. ’93, ’94), executive vice President, chief deposit officer and chief marketing officer, BofI Federal Bank.

Discussions were moderated by: Bhagwan Chowdhry, professor of finance, UCLA Anderson; Nurit Katz (MBA/MPP ’08), chief sustainability officer, UCLA; and Carlos J. Valderrama, president of the Center for Global Trade and Foreign Investment, Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce. Before the conference, Sebastian Edwards hosted a private luncheon for the speakers, moderators and student conference directors in the Dean’s Conference Room. Following the conference, a networking event was held which provided wonderful opportunities for the audience and speakers to continue conversations.

The event was organized by UCLA Anderson’s Center for Global Management, UCLA Anderson’s Latin American Business Association and UCLA’s Latino Business Student Association, in collaboration with the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce. Conference bronze sponsors included City National Bank, Credicorp and the Port of Los Angeles, and the UCLA Latin American Institute as a supporting organization.

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Monday, February 26, 2018, 12:30 PM, Beverly Wilshire Hotel

U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin on the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act and the American Economy

On Monday, February 26, 2018, U.S. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin addressed the Los Angeles World Affairs Council at a luncheon at the Beverly Wilshire Hotel. As a member of the LAWAC, the Center for Global Management supported 18 students from the executive, fully employed and full-time MBA programs to attend the lunchtime discussion and hear Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin’s upbeat assessment of the state of the U.S. economy and the anticipated effects of the recent tax bill. He discussed the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, recently passed by the House and the Senate and signed into law by President Trump, and its impact on tax payers and economic growth rates. He said that he was in favor of a strong dollar in the long term, higher wages for workers and added that “a little bit of inflations” is a good thing. He also addressed the current state of the U.S. economy, the strength of the financial system and his outlook for the coming year. Secretary Mnuchin discussed the global economy, the administration's attempts to reduce the U.S. trade imbalance with China and other nations in Asia, and the sanctions campaign against North Korea. Terry McCarthy, president and CEO of the Los Angeles World Affairs Council moderated the conversation with Treasury Secretary Mnuchin on America's economy and where it is headed.

Steven Mnuchin was sworn in as the 77th Secretary of the Treasury on February 13, 2017. Prior to his confirmation, Secretary Mnuchin was finance chairman for Donald J. Trump for President. He also served as a senior economic advisor to the president in crafting his economic positions and economic speeches. Earlier in his career, Secretary Mnuchin worked at The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. where he was a partner and served as chief information officer. He has extensive experience in global financial markets and oversaw trading in U.S. government securities, mortgages, money markets, and municipal bonds. View video >>

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Friday, February 23 & Saturday, February 24, 2018, A202, Collins Center, UCLA Anderson School of Management

Academic Conference: Populism’s New Wave: Comparative and Historical Perspectives

An academic conference, “Populism’s New Wave: Comparative and Historical Perspective” was held at UCLA Anderson on Friday, February 23 and Saturday, February 24, 2018. The conference showcased cutting-edge research on populism and included a historical angle too. Around 40 researchers from many different UC schools as well as Stanford and some international institutions gathered together at UCLA to present and discuss their research. The conference was co-sponsored by UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management and the All-University of California Group in Economic History. It was organized by Christian Dippel, Assistant Professor of Economics at UCLA Anderson who also presented his research on “Does Civic Leadership Matter? Evidence from the Forty-Eighters in the U.S.” with Professor Stephan Heblich from Bristol University, U.K. UCLA Anderson Professor of Economics Romain Wacziarg and Singapore Management University Professor Klaus Desmet also presented their research on “The Cultural Divide.” UCLA Anderson students interested in global management were invited to join the two sessions. The CGM provides research support to UCLA Anderson professors on topics related to global management issues, international relations, or issues of global/regional cooperation. Research with an applied focus are preferred, though theoretical research with a strong global focus is also considered.

The conference is a demonstration of UCLA Anderson’s strong commitment to studying and teaching issues of global economic relevance and demonstrated the academic excellence of UCLA’s vibrant group of academic economists. The conference program, including links to the papers that were presented, can be viewed here >>

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Thursday, February 22, 2018

Center for Global Management Mentor Program Gathering with Past and Present Mentees, Plateia at UCLA’s Luskin Conference Center

On Thursday, February 22, 2018, 2016-17 mentees shared experiences and networked with 2017-18 mentees at a lunch gathering at Plateia in UCLA’s Luskin Conference Center. The CGM mentor program connects current full-time MBA, FEMBA and EMBA students with members of the center’s advisory board, a dedicated and actively engaged group of visionary global leaders spanning a variety of geographies and industries. The program provides students with a unique opportunity to connect and form meaningful relationships with board members, who provide valuable counsel and guidance on professional endeavors, living and working abroad, global business and life lessons. By playing a direct role in guiding and shaping the next generation of global leaders, board members contribute in the most meaningful ways. Mentees gain valuable guidance in academic and career direction; obtain advice and perspective; gain insights into industries and professions of interest; and learn about professional and personal development skills required to succeed. The program was established to augment knowledge and understanding among students interested in pursuing a career in international business and management across a variety of industries and disciplines, as well as living and working abroad upon graduation. During the 2017-18 academic year, six full-time MBA, one FEMBA and two EMBA students are participating as mentees in the fifth year of the program.

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Wednesday, February 21, 2018 6:30 PM - 9:00 PM, UCLA Anderson Executive Dining Room

Global Business & Policy Forum “Climate Change and the Environment: The Intersection of Politics, Policy and Business”

Politics affects many issues of an international nature, such as climate change. Bringing the nations of the world together to reach agreement through international mechanisms, such as the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), requires broad buy-in and follow-through for the long-term. Beyond the politics and policies of nation states, especially the U.S. and China (the two largest carbon emitters), governments around the world have put forward many climate change-related plans to meet their Paris commitments. On Wednesday, February 21, the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management and UCLA School of Law's Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy hosted Christine Loh, former Under Secretary for the Environment of the Hong Kong SAR government and a leading voice in public policy in Hong Kong for a presentation and discussion of how governments meet these commitments, the critical importance of working with business and the need to galvanize the public to change behavior. During her presentation, Loh discussed the world’s pledge to limit temperature increases to below 2 degrees Celsius than pre-industrial times in 2015 with the Paris Agreement. Despite the agreement’s ambiguities and President Trump’s decision to withdraw the U.S., the world’s nations continue to follow the UNFCCC-led process. She talked about how cities and regional governments are also playing an increasingly important part in delivering on the Paris commitments, including those in China and Asia. While carbon emissions are far from under control, the Paris Agreement is beginning to have an impact on national and municipal authorities, which in turn impacts business. Furthermore, emissions from aviation and shipping (not part of the Paris Agreement) are also being addressed via other international bodies. The hope of the drafters of the Paris Agreement was that the signatory countries would speed-up in the coming years, as they embarked on the pathway and timeline they adopted under the Paris Agreement. Loh also addressed the China Securities Regulatory Commission (CSRC), which in collaboration with China’s Ministry of Environmental Protection, has introduced new requirements that, by 2020, it will mandate all listed companies and bond issuers to disclose environmental, social and governance (ESG) risks associated with their operations. Loh was then joined Sebastian Edwards, Henry Ford II Chair in International management and faculty director of the CGM for a moderated discussion which was followed by dinner with interactive table conversations where specific questions were discussed among the students, including: The Paris Agreement provides a model of international governance, however what will it take for signatories to hold together for the long-term? What impact will China’s mandate for ESG reporting have on companies listed in China? Will it have an impact outside China? What impact will it have on the financial services/consulting sector? Students were also asked to comment on whether they agree with how major businesses see weather-related and climate change risks and whether it is having an impact on their respective industry sector. The discussion over dinner engaged close to 70 students and faculty from the UCLA Anderson School of Management and the UCLA School of Law. The Global Business and Policy Forum is a collaborative partnership between UCLA Anderson’s Center for Global Management and the UCLA School of Law's Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy.

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Monday, February 12 through Thursday, February 15, 2018

Anderson International Film Festival

The Anderson International Film Festival is a celebration of the school's diversity through the screening of movies from many of the countries that UCLA Anderson students call home. The inaugural festival that took place at UCLA Anderson from Monday, February 12 through Thursday, February 15, 2018 engaged ten UCLA Anderson professional and identity clubs. During the four days, eleven movies and documentaries were screened from the home countries of many UCLA Anderson students. The film festival included films from China, France, India, Israel, Korea, Japan, Mexico, Taiwan and Thailand. Each screening was followed by a Q&A session facilitated by first and second year full-time MBA students from that particular country and leaders of the associated student club. These students led conversations around topics that the film addressed and issues that the film raised. Local cuisine from the country/region was also served. The festival raised awareness of the diverse backgrounds of the UCLA Anderson community.

One example of a film that was screen included “Waltz with Bashir,” sponsored by the Jewish Business Student Association. Israeli filmmaker Ari Folman wrote, directed and stars in this autobiographical animated film. As a 19-year-old infantry soldier in the 1982 war with Lebanon, Folman witnessed the Sabra and Shatila massacre, but realizes that he has no memory of the event. In 2006, he seeks out others who were in Beirut at the time to discuss their memories, including a psychologist specializing in post-traumatic stress disorders and the first journalist to cover the massacre. JBSA felt this film was important to screen as every Israeli citizen, male or female, serves in the military between ages 18-21 or longer. The shared experience is not only a unifying societal force but also a defining moment in many Israelis lives. Sadly, some of these defining moments have a negative, long lasting impact. “Waltz with Bashir” explores the impact that war can have on an individual, a group and society by critiquing one of the most controversial moments of Israeli military history. Rony Vexelman (’18) co-president of JBSA and Hagai Nir, vice president Israel Connection for JBSA led the discussion to educate the audience on the central role the military plays in Israel society as well as how the country’s introspection and critique help shape Israel’s future.

Over 50 students from across UCLA Anderson’s full-time and fully employed MBA programs attended the screenings with many students attending more than one screening. Many who attended felt they had gained a better understanding and appreciation of the country and culture as a result of attending the screening and participating in the conversation. The festival was presented by the UCLA Anderson Entertainment Management Association and was sponsored by the Center for Global Management, Center for MEMES, International Business Association and the Anderson Student Association.

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Thursday, February 15, 2018, Anderson Afternoon, North Terrace

Celebrating Lunar New Year at UCLA Anderson

To celebrate the international culture and diversity of UCLA Anderson, promote familiarity with and understanding of the Asian culture among students, and to strengthen cross club collaboration, the Center for Global Management supported the Greater China Business Association (GCBA), Asian Management Student Association (AMSA), Korean Business Student Association (KBSA), and Southeast Asia Business Association (SEABA) in their Lunar New Year-themed Anderson Afternoon. The event was held on February 15 on the North Terrace. The Lunar New Year is one of the most important festivals of the Greater China region, Korea, Southeast Asia and among immigrants around the world with roots from these regions. The four clubs took this great opportunity to invite the UCLA Anderson community to join the celebration and promote the cultural diversity at Anderson. The UCLA Anderson North Terrace was decorated with Lunar New Year décor and authentic food from China, Korea and Southeast Asia was served. To help the UCLA Anderson community better understand the traditions, the four clubs prepared a variety of celebration games and activities, including learning Chinese calligraphy, reading Chinese puzzle, winning red envelop, playing Korean Yut and Jegi games, as well as taking photos with props and accessories from the various cultures. UCLA undergraduate students also performed traditional Chinese lion dancing too. The event attracted over 400 UCLA Anderson students, faculty and staff who participated and shared in the celebrations together. The event, hosted by GCBA, AMSA, KBSA, and SEABA, was supported by the CGM, Anderson Student Association and the Office of Diversity Initiatives and Community Relations.

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Saturday, February 3, 2018, 8:15 AM - 5:30 PM, Covel Commons at UCLA

The Los Angeles Global Health Conference, "Looking In, Looking Out: Balancing Global and Local Priorities in the Current Political Climate"

The third annual Los Angeles Global Health Conference, "Looking In, Looking Out: Balancing Global and Local Priorities in the Current Political Climate," took place at UCLA on Saturday, February 3.  This annual global health conference hosted in Southern California brought together around 400 individuals from various disciplines across academia, NGOs, business, and the public sector to discuss the current status of world health, providing an interactive educational forum to address innovative ways to tackle health disparities-locally and globally. Home to individuals from more than 140 countries speaking 224 different languages, Los Angeles's rich cultural diversity makes it an ideal place to examine the current status of world health. Organized by UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine, Fielding School of Public Health, Undergraduate Departments, and USC Keck School of Medicine and affiliated schools, the conference educates and connects members of the UCLA, USC, CDU and Los Angeles communities around the varying disparities both in our backyards and around the world. Given the current global events, priority shifting is key to successfully address health disparities both in our backyard and abroad. The 2018 conference brought together students, faculty, researchers and professionals across the greater Los Angeles area from various backgrounds to create a dialogue to inform and equip future global health leaders. The opening keynote address, "Megatrends: Challenges and Opportunities in Global Health" was delivered by The Hon. Mark Dybul, MD, professor of medicine at Georgetown University, former executive director of the Global Fund to FIGHT AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria, and one of the founding architects in the formation of the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). During his address, Dybul discussed universal health coverage and how people engage and interact in global health. He also talked about the trends in sustainability, transition and co-financing. With the decline in external resources as countries are becoming middle income countries, he described how the private sector will play more of a role. This also means that the global health structures need to change too. Dybul addressed the trend of population growth as well as vulnerability and gender inequality and the importance of engaging young people with HIV. With the trend of mass mobility of ideas and people, ideas are moving faster than ever through connectivity bringing issues of justice, inequality and rights to the forefront. The closing keynote, "Anti-Racism in These Times: Your Role in the Global Health Equity Movement," was delivered by Michelle Morse, MD, MPH, co-founder of the Social Medicine Consortium and former deputy CMO, Partners in Health, Haiti. The day also included numerous breakout sessions addressing topics such as of how technology can help achieve universal health coverage, healthcare in the wake of international and domestic disasters, integrating mental health into primary care and into the global agenda and addressing violence through a public health lens. The UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management was a silver sponsor of the event.

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Thursday, February 1, 2018, 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM, Executive Dining Room

Global Networking Reception for Students & Faculty - Strengthening Intellectual and Social Connections between Faculty and Students

A key objective of the Center for Global Management is to help strengthen the intellectual and social connections between faculty and students interested in global management and international affairs. On February 1, 2018, prior to the opening of spring quarter course bidding, around 150 students, faculty and CGM partners gathered in the executive dining room for the center's annual networking reception. The reception provided an opportunity for UCLA Anderson students to learn about the global opportunities available both on campus and abroad, including the opportunity to travel abroad with the CGM's global immersion courses, make a global impact with the center's support for international field study projects, learn a language, specialize in global management, enroll in on-campus global management courses and participate in the CGM's programming. The event provided an opportunity for students to interact with faculty who teach global courses as well as faculty and Ph.D. students who have global research and teaching interests. First year students networked with students across degree programs who have traveled abroad, enrolled in global courses and engaged with the center's programming. The center's faculty and executive directors, Professor Sebastian Edwards and Lucy Allard provided welcome remarks and an overview of the CGM's programming and introduced faculty members to the students. The reception provided an opportunity for students currently enrolled in global courses and engaged with the center's programming, including those who have traveled abroad for global immersion courses and international field study primary research to network and share their experiences with others.

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Tuesday, January 23, 2018, 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Executive Dining Room

Global Management Speaker Series “U.S. Foreign Policy and International Relations Under President Trump Vs. President Obama, with special attention on the new, positive, bi-lateral relationship with Argentina” with Noah B. Mamet (B.A. ’92), former U.S. Ambassador to Argentina

The U.S. and Argentina have enjoyed bilateral relations for almost two centuries. Today, the two countries must partner to address pressing global challenges such as climate change, refugees, defense of human rights and democracy, as well as expand trade and investment and promote cooperation in science and technology to deepen Argentina’s integration with the global economy and promote strong, sustainable and balanced economic growth. On Tuesday, January 23, during the lunch hour UCLA alumnus Noah Mamet (B.A. ’92), former United States Ambassador to Argentina joined the Center for Global Management in the executive dining room for a presentation and conversation, moderated by Andres Terech, adjunct associate professor of marketing who is from Argentina and also leads the center’s global immersion courses to the country. Ambassador Mamet discussed international relations and U.S. foreign policy issues under the two presidents and the State Department’s role. He also addressed business and economic ties between the United States and Argentina and the opportunities for business and investment in light of new leadership in each country. Students from across the various degree programs at UCLA Anderson as well as UCLA, Ph.D. students and MPP students attended the event. Noah B. Mamet served as U.S. Ambassador to Argentina under President Obama's administration, during which bi-lateral relations between the U.S. and Argentina dramatically improved by initially focusing on innovation, entrepreneurship, energy, and educational exchanges and later adding security cooperation, counter-narcotics and climate change. He now lives in California as well as Buenos Aires, focusing on international investments in Argentina as well as Argentine companies expanding internationally, specifically in the areas of energy, technology, real estate and agriculture. The event was organized by the UCLA Center for Global Management and sponsored by the Latin American Business Association and the UCLA Latin American Institute and Center for Southern Cone Studies. Video will be available shortly.

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Tuesday, January 16, 2018, 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM, Executive Dining Room

World Today Discussion Series on “Creating, Running and Managing Businesses in Emerging Markets: From the Perspective of an Entrepreneur, Investor, CEO and Chairman” with CGM Board Chair Craig Ehrlich (B.A. ’78), Chairman and Co-founder, Novare Technologies, Inc.; Independent Director, Bharti Airtel and Former Chairman, GSMA, moderated by Professor Sebastian Edwards

Over the past decade, business and investment opportunities in emerging markets have increased dramatically. Yet these countries represent a wide spectrum of economic, legal and political environments. In order to be successful in emerging markets, it is necessary to have a detailed understanding of the problems and challenges these markets face and how these economies operate. How are opportunities to enter emerging markets identified? What are good indicators to evaluate the timing of entry? How are uncertainties handled? How is funding secured? From formulating an effective market entry strategy, selecting the right local partner and managing political and economic pressures to financing ventures, hiring the right talent and corporate governance issues. On Tuesday, January 16, students from UCLA Anderson’s executive, fully employed, full-time as well as Ph.D. programs filled the UCLA Anderson executive dining to hear answers to these questions from the Center for Global Management board chair, Craig Ehrlich. In a Davos-style conversation, moderated by Professor Sebastian Edwards, Ehrlich also shared his personal career trajectory since serving as UCLA student body president in the 1970s, later spending 30 years in Hong Kong and now coming full circle with his recent return to Los Angeles and his active involvement in the UCLA community. During the 75-minute conversation, Ehrlich discussed the most salient features of emerging market economies and the opportunities, risks and challenges that these markets present for entrepreneurs and investors as well as for executive and board leadership. He also addressed the importance of building a personal brand as well as the importance of philanthropy and giving back. He fondly discussed his engagement and support of UCLA. Ehrlich is a member of the UCLA/Peking University Joint Research Institute Advisory Committee and the board chair, as well as a founding member of the CGM. In 2015, Ehrlich became a member of the UCLA Foundation board and, subsequently, of its executive and philanthropy committees. He is the former chairman of the GSMA — the world’s largest trade association for the mobile industry — a position that he held for seven years. He is also former chairman of Carmel Ventures Asia, a leading venture capital company. Ehrlich also currently serves as the lead independent director of Bharti Airtel, the world’s fourth largest telecom company, and has sat on public boards in Hong Kong, Israel, India, the Philippines and the United States. The World Today Discussion Series engages students in dialogue in an interactive, engaging and enriching discussion format around current global issues that transcend borders. Through the series, the CGM engages globally minded students with issues that matter and ideas that stimulate. Through balanced discourse, the series serves as a neutral forum to educate students on global issues while at the same time encourage debate and examination. The event was supported by Anderson Tech Business Association, Entrepreneur Association and the International Business Association.

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Wednesday, December 13 - Wednesday, December 20, 2017, India

31 Students Visit Delhi and Mumbai, India for the CGMs Global Immersion Course “The Business Environment of India,” led by Romain Wacziarg, Hans Hufschmid Chair in Management and Professor of Economics

During winter break, over 30 students from UCLA Anderson’s full-time, fully employed, executive and UCLA-NUS executive MBA programs visited Delhi and Mumbai as part of the CGM’s Global Immersion course “The Business Environment of India,” led by Romain Wacziarg, Hans Hufschmid Chair in Management and Professor of Economics. This was the fourth global immersion course to focus on and visit India.

During the one-week in country, students heard from and engaged with many distinguished and influential business leaders and members of the civil society and political leadership in India. During the first half of the week, students visited companies such as Helion Ventures, an Indian-focused venture capital firm where they heard from Sanjeev Aggarwal, its co-founder and senior managing director about funding strategies and investments in technology; Airtel (Bharti Enterprises), the largest mobile operator in South Asia and third largest in the world to learn about India’s telecom sector, consumer habits, expansion plans and how Bharti Enterprises is driving strategic initiatives across Bharti’s businesses; Hero Motors, the largest two-wheeler motorcycle and scooter manufacturer in the world to understand the importance of new product development and how the company is increasing its market share. They also enjoyed a tour of its factory. Students visited the creative global marketing and advertising agency BBDO where they heard from the company’s CEO, Ajai Jhala and its chairman and chief creative officer, Josy Paul about the buying behavior of rural and urban consumers in India as well as the company’s challenges of enticing both. Students also visited Paras Hospital to learn about the healthcare system in India, the role of private hospitals and gain an understanding of medical tourism as a business advantage of the healthcare sector in India. Visits were complemented by presentations and discussions with Secretary Dr. K.P. Krishnan, at the Ministry of Skill Development and Entrepreneurship who talked about the lack of skilled workers in India and importance of education reform. Presentations on entrepreneurship and India’s startup ecosystem and on working in India and women in leadership positions by Leo Capital and the Avantha Group respectively. Students also enjoyed a panel discussion at the Imperial Hotel, "Made in India - Made for India," moderated by Arvind Singhal (’82), chairman, Technopak Advisors Pvt. Ltd. and president of the UCLA Anderson Alumni chapter, India who was joined by Krish Iyer, CEO of Walmart (India) and Sunil Jain, managing editor of the Financial Express. A networking event followed and the group was joined by additional UCLA Anderson alumni.

In Mumbai, students heard from N.P. Singh, CEO of Sony Pictures Networks India which handles Sony Pictures' diversified interests in India, about the media and entertainment sector in the country and in particular its television business. The group also enjoyed a tour of the Sony sports studio. During the visit to the National Stock Exchange of India, the largest of the country’s two major stock exchanges, students learned about Mumbai’s role as the financial capital of India, opportunities and challenges of investing in local markets and how the exchange’s technology works. This was later complemented by a presentation and discussion with Satya Bansal, CEO of Barclays Wealth and Investment Management division who shared his insights on the financial and banking sector and the wealth management business of Barclays, a leading private bank in India. The group also visited the Reserve Bank of India, the central institution of the country that handles monetary policies and is responsible for maintaining economic growth and stability. The Bank’s deputy governor, Viral Acharya discussed India’s central banking and impact of the country’s recent demonetization. Students also learned how Uber in India is revolutionizing the way people commute and how the company adapted its model for the Indian marketplace, accepting cash payments rather than debit/credit cards. They learned about the economic power of Indian Conglomerates from Tata Consulting Services, a global leader in IT services, consulting, technology and digital solutions and a subsidiary of the Tata Group, an Indian multinational conglomerate, as well as the history of Tata and how it became the enormous multinational conglomerate it is today. On the final evening, students enjoyed a panel discussion at the Royal Bombay Yacht Club, "Innovate for India, Innovate for the World,” moderated by Ashwin Mittal (’01), CEO at Cross-Tab Marketing Services Pvt. Ltd. and president of the UCLA Anderson Alumni Mumbai subchapter. He was joined by UCLA Anderson alumni Abhishek Agarwal (’10), co-founder and CEO at CreditVidya and Jehil Thakkar (’98), partner at Deloitte India together with Sasha Mirchandani, founder and managing director at Kae Capital, co-founder at Mumbai Angels. A networking event followed. The week highlighted the strength and influence of UCLA Anderson's growing alumni network in India.

Students also got to experience some of the culture, cuisine and sights of India, including guided tours of Delhi and Mumbai. In Delhi, students explored an interesting blend of diverse cultures, traditions, sights, and rich history and visited many spectacular sites including the India Gate, Qutab Minar historical site with the tallest minaret in all of India and the Gurudwara Bangla Sahib Sikh temple. Some students enjoyed an Old Delhi local food and rickshaw tour. In Mumbai, students visited the upwardly mobile and gentrified residential area Malabar hill and saw some of the top attractions of Mumbai including the hanging gardens, the Gateway of India, the Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj Terminus, formerly known as Victoria Terminus and the Mani Bhavan Gandhi Sangrahalaya, and also enjoyed some shopping at Colaba. Some students went on an evening tour of Dharavi to explore one of the world’s largest slums and learn about its operations, including traditional pottery and textile industries, leather tanning and recycling facility which processes waste from other parts of Mumbai.

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Monday, November 20, 2017, 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM, Dean’s Conference Room

Lunch Series with Tom Georgis (’98), Senior Vice President, Development at SolarReserve on “The Renewable Energy Space from a Global Perspective”

On Monday, November 20, 2017 the Center for Global Management hosted a brown bag luncheon with Tom Georgis (’98), senior vice president of development at SolarReserve, a leading global developer of utility-scale solar power projects, which includes electricity generation by solar thermal energy and photovoltaic panels. Based in Santa Monica, Georgis is responsible for driving the company’s continued growth through initiating and developing projects and business opportunities across the U.S., Latin America, Asia and Australia. Georgis was instrumental in the opening of SolarReserve’s offices in Chile and Australia to serve these rapidly expanding regional markets, and is in the process of advancing strategic partnerships that will facilitate the deployment of the company’s advanced technology in China. Students from the full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs, including members of UCLA Anderson’s Energy Management Group and students interested in global management gathered in the dean’s conference room during the lunch hour to hear his thoughts and experiences on the renewable energy industry and insights on the business from a global perspective; his career trajectory since graduating from UCLA Anderson; as well as his experience working and doing business internationally through project examples and the complexities of different markets, including currency risk management. He also shared his thoughts and predictions on future employment opportunities for students looking to enter the energy sector, in particular in the renewables space. Georgis serves on the board of the Price Center for Entrepreneurship and Innovation at UCLA Anderson and also as a guest speaker in UCLA Anderson’s Business Strategy in Emerging Markets course. The lunch was supported by the Energy Management Group.

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November 13-17, 2017, International Education Week 2017
Thursday, November 16, 2017, 11:30 AM – 2:00 PM, Ackerman Union

The Enduring Value of International Education: UCLA International Education Resource Fair

International Education Week (IEW) is a joint initiative of the U.S. Departments of State and Education to celebrate the benefits of international education and exchange worldwide which ran from November 13-17, 2017. In celebration of IEW, UCLA offered a series of events to celebrate international education and exchange, campus diversity, global perspectives and global citizenship on campus. The UCLA International Institute, together with a team of campus partners and over 20 cosponsors, including the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management, planned a weeklong celebration of international education. The week showcased UCLA’s extensive international education resources that were informative, fun and intellectually stimulating. On Thursday, November 16, graduate and undergraduate students attended the international education fair and information sessions in Ackerman Union to learn about UCLA’s international study programs, research centers, graduate and undergraduate fellowships, study abroad and travel programs, career and internship opportunities, and more. International education resource fair exhibitors included the Center for Global Management, Center for World Languages and Graduate Fellowship Services as well as many of the centers within the UCLA International Institute, such as the Latin American Institute, Center for Chinese Studies, African Studies Center and the Burkle Center for International Relations. A series of information sessions highlighting specific opportunities ran concurrently in Ackerman Union such as Internships without Borders and UCEAP Peace Corps preparation. Numerous special events took place throughout the week, including the “UCLA Global Conversation” on Wednesday, November 15 in Powell Library, the signature event of UCLA’s celebration of IEW 2017. The keynote address, “Local and Global Health Equity” was delivered by Dr. Kelsey Martin, a neuroscientist and Dean of the David Geffen School of Medicine. Welcome and introductory remarks were provided by Scott Waugh, executive vice chancellor and provost and Cindy Fan, vice provost. Inspired to pursue a medical career by her experience as a Peace Corps volunteer, Dr. Martin entered the M.D./Ph.D. program at Yale University where she studied influenza virus-host interactions. She joined the UCLA faculty in 1999 and has been a leader in UCLA’s drive to promote cross-disciplinary cooperation among scientists in neuroscience and other brain-related research.

Although the CGM courses are mainly open to UCLA Anderson students at this time, the center’s larger events, such as the annual Wilbur K. Woo Greater China Business Conference and the annual Latin American Business Conference where the CGM partners with CSSA (Chinese Students & Scholars Association) and LBSA (Latino Student Business Association), as well as many of the its larger speaker events are open to UCLA students, faculty and staff. The fair was an outreach event to showcase the range of global education programs and opportunities on campus, so even though the CGM’s academic courses are restricted to UCLA Anderson students, undergraduate students from across campus are interested in future graduate opportunities and in learning more about the CGM’s programming and events, including its conferences, global immersion courses and international exchange program. The International Education Fair was a terrific opportunity to showcase UCLA Anderson’s important contribution to international education at UCLA.

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Monday, November 13, 2017, 6:30 PM – 9:00 PM, Executive Dining Room

Global Business & Policy Forum “Cybersecurity: Business, Regulation and Privacy”

Hardly a month goes by without the announcement of another massive breach of data held by a government agency, an international business or an essential service provider. Cyberwarfare, cyberespionage, and cyberterrorism are big challenges facing governments throughout the world and businesses large and small. Of course, it is often the citizens and the customers that experience the damages inflicted by these attacks as they, in turn, become the victims of identity theft and related wrongdoing. Is the breach of any organization’s cybersecurity just a matter of time? Can a modern commercial society organize itself to deal efficiently and effectively with breaches of cybersecurity? Are there regulatory schemes that can offer real protection to citizens and customers with respect to their private personal data? Is it inevitable that we will abandon traditional notions of privacy as our data, both deeply personal and trivial, are bought and sold by companies as well as international rings of malefactors? On Monday, November 13, the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management and UCLA School of Law's Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy hosted Kristen Eichensehr, assistant professor at the UCLA School of Law and a frequent commentator on national and business cybersecurity for a presentation and discussion on these important issues for the first forum of the new academic year. With timely and relevant examples, Eichensehr discussed “cybersecurity law’ where boundaries are still being defined, data breach, FTC enforcement actions, cybercrime laws and hacking back as well as securing the Internet of Things. Eichensehr then joined Joel Feuer, executive director of the Lowell Milken Institute for a moderated discussion which was followed by dinner with interactive table conversations where specific questions were discussed among the students, including: How effective are existing laws at protecting individuals and businesses from privacy and cybersecurity-related harms? How can they be made more effective? Should businesses be permitted to “hack back” to mitigate the damage that they suffer from cyber intrusions? If so, what should businesses consider in deciding whether to hack back? What are the best ways to improve the security of Internet of Things devices? Is government intervention necessary or desirable? The discussion over dinner engaged close to 70 students and faculty from the UCLA Anderson School of Management and the UCLA School of Law. Eichensehr writes and teaches about foreign relations, separation of powers, cybersecurity, and national security law. Before joining the UCLA faculty, she clerked for Justices Sandra Day O’Connor and Sonia Sotomayor of the Supreme Court of the United States and for Chief Judge Merrick B. Garland of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit. She also served as special assistant to the legal adviser of the U.S. Department of State and practiced at Covington & Burling LLP in Washington, D.C., where she specialized in appellate litigation, international and national security law, and cybersecurity issues. The Global Business and Policy Forum is a collaborative partnership between UCLA Anderson’s Center for Global Management and the UCLA School of Law's Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy.

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Monday, November 13, 2017, 6:00 PM, UCLA Pauley Pavilion

2017 John Wooden Global Leadership Award Dinner Benefiting the 2017 John Wooden fellows and Honoring Kevin Plank, Under Armour Founder, Chief Executive Officer and Chairman of the Board

On Monday, November 13, 2017, UCLA Anderson recognized Kevin Plank, founder, CEO and chairman of Fortune 500 athletic apparel company, Under Armour with the John Wooden Global Leadership Award. The distinction, named for legendary UCLA basketball coach, author and leadership expert John Wooden (1910–2010), is awarded each year to an exceptional leader who embodies the principles exemplified by the legendary John Wooden and whose leadership style and service to the community reflects the same high benchmarks of performance, integrity and ethical values set by Wooden.

Fittingly, on its 10th anniversary, the award ceremony took place in the historic UCLA Pauley Pavilion where Coach John Wooden, led the UCLA men’s basketball team to many of his ten championship wins between 1964 and 1975. The audience of nearly 700 included UCLA Chancellor Gene Block - who is celebrating his own decade of leadership at the No. 1 public university in the country, UCLA Anderson Board of Advisors members and other generous supporters, along with members of Coach Wooden’s family. UCLA’s women’s gymnastics coach Valorie Kondos Field together with Basketball Hall of Famers Jamaal Wilkes (B.A. ’74) and Ann Meyers Drysdale (B.A. ’78) joined past Wooden Fellows, current UCLA Anderson students, alumni and faculty for a ceremony that included a special appearance by Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (B.A. ’69), the NBA’s all-time leading scorer who spoke about his lifelong relationship with Coach. His 2017 book Coach Wooden & Me: Our 50-Year Friendship On and Off the Court was this year’s gift to attendees. Dan Guerrero, head of UCLA Athletics, also shared his thoughts about how UCLA teams and the athletic department carry on the traditions Coach Wooden is remembered for — through his record on the court, his many maxims and his well-known Pyramid of Success.

UCLA Anderson Dean Judy Olian introduced Plank by saying, “Kevin Plank was daring enough to challenge an industry, with a vision to build a sportswear company that enables athletes to perform better. He’s not just an enormously successful entrepreneur. Taking a page out of Coach Wooden’s playbook, he’s a leader who seeks to empower men and women around the world to follow their dreams and excel as confident, passionate competitors.” Plank received the award in recognition of his ethical business leadership, philanthropic activities and commitment to community.

Peter Guber, chairman and CEO of Mandalay Entertainment, co-owner of the Golden State Warriors and the Los Angeles Dodgers, and a lecturer at UCLA Anderson, interviewed Plank on stage. He focused their conversation on Plank’s leadership values and entrepreneurial approach to starting Baltimore-based Under Armour, which employs more than 10,000 people, outfits 7,000 student athletes in the Baltimore area and ranks No. 42 on Fortune’s list of the 100 fastest growing companies. Under Armour recently signed a $280 million sponsorship deal with UCLA. On the subject of partnering with UCLA, Plank said the East Coast brand needed a presence in California. He said that through the UCLA affiliation, his company “built heat” in a state with seven Major League Baseball teams and an active economy for athletics. He accepted the Wooden Award on behalf of Under Armour, drawing parallels between a large company and a major university, saying, “You need a team, but you also need a culture.”

Net proceeds from the dinner fund four $25,000 John Wooden Global Leadership Fellowships, given to deserving UCLA Anderson students who embody Coach Wooden’s leadership ideals and commitment to improving the lives of others. During the ceremony, the four 2017 fellowship recipients Evan Barnes (EMBA ’18), Anna Goldberg (MBA ’18), Sana Rahim (FEMBA ’19) and Brandon Scott (MBA/M.D. ’18) were recognized and awarded the John Wooden Global Leadership Fellowship, which is among the most prestigious honors Anderson students can receive. They took the stage to express their thoughts on what Coach Wooden’s values-based leadership means to them. Wooden Fellows are honored because they possess his focus on ethics, team spirit, skill, hard work and loyalty, along with a commitment to constant learning, continual improvement and innovation.

UCLA Anderson, in partnership with Coach John Wooden’s family, honors one exceptional leader each year with this prestigious award for his or her exemplary leadership and service to the community. Past recipients of the John Wooden Global Leadership Award include: W. James McNerney Jr., retired president, CEO and chairman of Boeing (2016); Ursula Burns, chairman and CEO of Xerox (2015); Paul E. Jacobs, executive chairman of Qualcomm Inc. (2014); Bob Iger, chairman and CEO of The Walt Disney Company (2013); Indra Nooyi, chairman and CEO of PepsiCo (2012); Peter Ueberroth, managing director of Contrarian Group (2011); Frederick W. Smith, chairman, president and CEO of FedEx (2010); Kenneth Chenault, chairman and CEO of American Express (2009); and Howard Schultz, chairman, president and CEO of Starbucks (2008)

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Thursday, November 9, 2017, 12:00 PM - 2:00 PM, Collins Center

"Innovation and Creative Economy - Opportunities and Challenges for Indonesia" with Dr. Mari Pangestu, Former Minister of Tourism & Creative Economy, Republic of Indonesia

On Thursday, November 9, 2017, UCLA welcomed to campus Dr. Mari Pangestu, the former Minister of Tourism and Creative Industries for the Republic of Indonesia and the first female Chinese Indonesian to hold a cabinet position in Indonesia. Following a private breakfast with students, Dr. Pangestu delivered a public lecture to a packed room focused on the digital economy in Indonesia: creative destruction and realizing emerging opportunities. She addressed digital developments in Indonesia, the rapid internet and mobile penetration and the country’s significant social media usage. She also discussed the impact of the digital economy, growth of the creative industries and importance of evidence based policy. Dr. Pangestu is a member of the International Council on Women’s Business Leadership, the UNCTAD Secretary General’s Panel of Eminent Persons, the Advisory Board of the Global Competitiveness Forum (WEF), and the Network of Global Agenda Councils. She served as Indonesia’s Minister of Trade from 2004 to 2011. Prior to this she was active in various trade forums such as PECC and is one of the foremost economics experts in Indonesia. As an economist, she is widely published in the Indonesian and international media. The event was part of the Indonesian Studies Colloquium, organized by the UCLA Center for Southeast Asian Studies and cosponsored by Cosponsored by UCLA International Institute, CGM, Asia Foundation and Pacific Council on International Policy.

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Monday, November 6, 2017, 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Korn Convocation Hall

Robertson Lecture Series on Global Business Leadership with John Thompson, Chairman, Microsoft Corp. and Former CEO, Symantec “Global Leadership in the Midst of Disruptive Change”

On Monday, November 6, 2017, Microsoft Chairman, John W. Thompson joined Dean Judy Olian for a fireside chat before a capacity crowd in Korn Convocation Hall for a conversation around global leadership in the midst of profound disruptive change. Thompson discussed his career trajectory of over 40 years and drew on lessons learned during his decade as CEO of internet security company Symantec, where he transformed the company into a leader in security, storage and systems management and his 28-year career with IBM Corporation where he held various senior leadership positions to his current role as a start-up investor and chairman of one of the world’s most valuable companies. Thompson, who succeeded Bill Gates as chairman of Microsoft in 2014 and led the search for Microsoft’s next CEO; as a result, Satya Nadella was selected, addressed issues ranging from AI-driven digital transformation and cybersecurity to managing cultural change and the role of the board. He also discussed Microsoft’s strength in the cloud, the current global macroeconomic environment and implications for the U.S. technology sector as well as the lack of diversity in the sector. Since 2009, Thompson has been an active investor in early-stage technology companies in Silicon Valley. He currently serves as either an advisor or board member with Illumina, ReviverMX and Illumio. Previously, he served on the boards of NIPSCO (Northern Indiana Public Service Company), Fortune Brands, Liquid Robotics, Seagate Technologies, and United Parcel Services (UPS). Around 400 UCLA Anderson students, alumni, faculty, staff as well as members of the Los Angeles World Affairs Council and the Los Angeles community gathered in Korn Convocation Hall for the event. Opening remarks were provided by Aubrey Rho (’18), president of the UCLA Anderson Tech Business Association. The event which was part of the CGM’s Robertson Lecture Series on Global Business Leadership was organized by the CGM and supported by the UCLA Anderson Tech Business Association and Los Angeles World Affairs Council.

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Tuesday, October 24, 2017, 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Executive Dining Room

Global Management Speaker Series “Israel: A Start Up Nation – Entrepreneurship, Innovation and Sustainability” with Ron Dermer, Israeli Ambassador to the United States

Israel is often referred to as the "Startup Nation," the country with the highest number of startups per capita in the world. Over the past few decades, thousands of Israeli startups have launched innovations in various fields including cyber-technology, cybersecurity, and medical advancements. Israel is consistently found among global rankings of the top innovation ecosystems in the world. Entrepreneurs and venture capitalist are looking more and more to Israel to establish research and development centers. On Tuesday, October 24, during the lunch hour, Ron Dermer, Israeli Ambassador to the United States joined the Center for Global Management in the executive dining room for a presentation and conversation, moderated by Stuart Gabriel, Arden Realty Chair and Professor of Finance. Ambassador Dermer addressed how Israel, a small nation scarce in natural resources and located in a hostile neighborhood, became a world leader in innovation and groundbreaking technology and discussed Israel’s transformation into the Startup Nation. Students from across the various degree programs at UCLA Anderson as well as UCLA undergraduate student members of the Israel-related business group, Tamid attended the event. From 2005-2008, Ambassador Dermer served as Israel's Minister of Economic Affairs in the United States and from 2009-2013, he served as Senior Advisor to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. Israel attracts not only multiple entrepreneurs and venture capitalists but it also attracts over 100 UCLA Anderson MBA students annually who are keen to learn about Israel’s history, culture and modern-day society. Students have the opportunity to join the Anderson Israel Trek, organized by the UCLA Anderson Jewish Business Student Association (JBSA) as well as the Center for Global Management’s Global Immersion course, led by Professor Gabriel – both will be returning to Israel during spring break 2018. The UCLA Younes & Soraya Nazarian Center for Israel Studies and JBSA were supporters of the event.

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Monday, October 23, 2017, 12:00 PM, Executive Dining Room

Students from UCLA Anderson’s Greater China Business Association Network Over Lunch with EMBA Students from Fudan University

Students from UCLA Anderson’s Greater China Business Association joined a luncheon to meet and network with students from the School of Management, Fudan University, Shanghai, China who visited UCLA for a global management seminar on “Challenges and Opportunities for the Global Executive: Focus on Innovation and Entrepreneurial Development.” The seminar provided participants with an opportunity to complete part of their studies at an international location and gain valuable global experience and insights. It focused on the innovation and creativity that are such an integral part of the business community in Los Angeles and California, including current academic research and business applications in cultural and creative industries. During their time, the students also visited local companies and toured the UCLA Anderson Venture Accelerator, a 10,000-square-foot incubator for nascent UCLA startups, and heard from UCLA Anderson Business Creation Option (BCO) teams, who talked about their companies and ideas. Joining the students for lunch were Shi Zhang, associate professor of marketing and faculty director for the seminar who also taught a session on “Creativity and Social Innovations.”

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Thursday, October 19, 2017, 4:30 PM, Anderson Afternoon North Terrace

Celebrating Diwali at UCLA Anderson

To celebrate the international diversity of UCLA Anderson, the Center for Global Management actively supports cultural events hosted international student clubs such as the South Asian Business Association (SABA). SABA promotes familiarity and understanding of South Asian culture among students during their annual flagship event, the Diwali Festival. Diwali or Deepavali is the festival of lights that marks the victory of good over evil. It is celebrated every year in the fall in the northern hemisphere (spring in the southern hemisphere). On October 19, 2017, during the weekly Anderson Afternoon gathering, domestic and international students together to celebrate the Diwali Festival. UCLA Anderson’s North Terrace was decorated with diyas (lights), traditional Indian food was served and members of SABA were dressed in traditional Indian attire. Students from SABA provided musical entertainment by singing songs in Hindi language and performing Bollywood dances. Other activities to engage the over 400 attendees included a mehndi/henna hand tattoo stall and a photo booth.

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Wednesday, October 18, 2017, 5:00 PM - 6:30 PM, Executive Dining Room

World Today Discussion Series on “Strategic Finance – Driving Global Competitive Advantage and Shareholder Value A CFO’s Perspective” with Kevin Berryman (’87), Chief Financial Officer and Executive Vice President of Jacobs Engineering, moderated by Professor Sebastian Edwards

What is it like to run a global business with distributed operations in the midst of complex and changing economic, political and cultural environments in the United States and globally? How are business and investment decisions made? On Wednesday, October 18, a room packed full of students from UCLA Anderson’s full-time, fully employed, executives MBA as well as MFE and Ph.D. programs gathered in the executive dining room for a World Today Discussion Series on “Strategic Finance – Driving Global Competitive Advantage and Shareholder Value A CFO’s Perspective.” CGM advisory board member and UCLA Anderson alumnus of the fully employed MBA program, Kevin Berryman (’87), CFO and executive vice president of Jacobs Engineering joined CGM faculty director and Henry Ford II Chair in International Management, Professor Sebastian Edwards for a “Davos-style” conversation on how companies can drive competitive advantage and shareholder value. During the 75-minute long conversation and audience question time, Berryman and Edwards discussed the confluence of strategy and finance, working in and across different markets, human capital management, as well as tax considerations, the strong dollar, technological innovation, currency hedging and more. Berryman also talked about the importance of philanthropy and authentic leadership as well as the importance of working in teams, which he learned during his time at UCLA Anderson. The World Today Discussion Series engages students in dialogue in an interactive, engaging and enriching discussion format around current global issues that transcend borders. Through the series, the CGM engages globally minded students with issues that matter and ideas that stimulate. Through balanced discourse, the series serves as a neutral forum to educate students on global issues while at the same time encourage debate and examination.

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Wednesday, October 4, 2017, 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM, A-201, Collins Center

Global Management Lecture Series “What If You Could Help End Global Poverty In Your Lifetime?” with Leila Janah, founder and CEO, Samasource and LXMI

On Wednesday, October 4, social entrepreneur and founder Leila Janah, recently named one of Fortune’s “40 Under 40” joined the Center for Global Management and the UCLA Burkle Center for International Relations for a conversation on her new book, Give Work. During the lunch hour, Janah addressed a packed classroom of UCLA Anderson students, alumni and faculty as well as UCLA students and alumni and members of the local community. She shared what she has learned building Samasource and LXMI, two ventures that share a common social mission and focus on using new sourcing techniques to reduce poverty. Janah was later joined by Kal Raustiala, professor of law and director of the UCLA Burkle Center who moderated a fascinating conversation with the inspiring social entrepreneur and founder. In her book, Give Work, Janah offers a much-needed solution to solving extreme poverty: redirect aid money to social enterprises that give dignified, steady, fair-wage work to low-income people, and incentivize big companies to choose suppliers that use this model. Her social business, Samasource, connects people living below the poverty line–on roughly $2 a day–to digital work for major tech companies. To date, the organization has provided over $10 million in direct income to tens of thousands of people the world had written off, dramatically altering the trajectory of their entire communities, for the better. Janah shared with the audience how she and her team go into the world’s poorest regions–from refugee camps in Kenya to the Mississippi Delta in Arkansas–and train people to do simple digital work for companies like Google, Walmart, and Microsoft. Janah has tested various Give Work business models in all corners of the world. She shared poignant stories of many who have benefited from Samasource’s work, and importantly, where the intervention hasn’t worked, and offers a blueprint to fight poverty with an evidence-based, economically sustainable model. Janah has been profiled by the New York Times, Fast Company, Wired, Forbes, Glamour, Real Simple, and Inc. She was recently named one of Fortune's 40 Under 40, Condé Nast’s Daring 25, and Elle’s 2016 Top Women in Tech, and Samasource was named one of Fast Company’s Most Innovative Companies of 2016.The discussion was organized by the UCLA Burkle Center for International Relations and UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management.

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Sunday, September 10 - Saturday, September 16, 2017, Sweden and Finland

40 students visit Stockholm, Sweden and Helsinki, Finland for the CGM’s Global Immersion course “Entrepreneurship and Corporate Renewal in Scandinavia,” led by George Abe, lecturer in entrepreneurship and faculty director, Strategic Management Research Program

In September, 40 current students from UCLA Anderson’s full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs visited Sweden and Finland for the first time as part of the CGM’s Global Immersion course “Entrepreneurship and Corporate Renewal in Scandinavia,” led by George Abe, lecturer in entrepreneurship and director of the EMBA’s Strategic Management Research (SMR) program.

During the week, students heard from and engaged with many successful entrepreneurs and business leaders as well as many start-up companies. The inaugural speaker for the week was Christopher Kandimaa, head of equity finance for Dankse Bank who spoke about “the Swedish model” and discussed the Swedish financial system, the Riksbanken, shadow banking and how the tax system is structured, particularly as it affects entrepreneurs. In Finland, the group also heard from Nordic Investment Bank (NIB) on “Finnish Banking” and learned about green financing. Martin Gren, an engaging and very successful Swedish entrepreneur and co-founder of Axis Communications addressed the group and discussed the company’s international expansion. Petra Wadström, CEO and founder of Solvatten who counts among Sweden's top 100 women and Sweden's 100 most influential environmentalists talked about social entrepreneurship and Solvatten, a portable solar-powered water purifying device made for heating and treating water. In Sweden, guest lectures were complemented by a number of site visits. Students visited Telia Company, a dominant telecom and mobile network operator in Sweden and Finland and heard about Purple+, Telia’s digital innovation hub that addresses the challenges to protect Telia’s core business and unleash new growth opportunities. Students also visited Startup Hub 46, founded in 2013 to gather the Swedish startup community and help startups grow and expand internationally and heard from and networked with five young entrepreneurs. The group also visited KTH Royal Institute of Technology, one of Europe’s leading technical and engineering universities and a key center of intellectual talent and innovation and Skanska, headquartered in Stockholm and famous for constructing the famous Swiss Re building, a sustainable landmark in London. UCLA alumnus Tobias Hummel (’06) facilitated a panel of successful entrepreneurs who joined Professor Abe for a fireside chat and shared their success stories and the challenges they faced on the entrepreneurial path. This was followed by a networking reception for the students.

In Finland, students visited xEdu, the Nordic region's number 1 business accelerator for education startups and also UCLA Anderson’s GAP partner, Tekes. Tekes is the Finnish Funding Agency for Innovation and the most important publicly funded expert organization for financing research, development and innovation in the country. Tekes provides innovation funding and services to companies that are looking to internationalize and supports efforts to attract foreign investment in Finland. The group also visited Aalto University Start-up Center, a successful and fast developing business accelerator operating within Aalto University which provides a platform for start-ups to accelerate their growth through offering modern workspace facilities, a wide range of development services and business advice, as well as an extensive network of experts. Here, the group was joined by nine start-up companies who each gave a short 5-minute pitch to the students on their ideas, products and companies and presented their biggest challenge. The students then broke out into small groups for 20-minute roundtable discussions for some brainstorming with the start-ups. Later in the week, the students visited Lightneer, Inc., a learning game studio dedicated to creating the next generation learning games. Founded in 2015, the company aims to make learning games fun and designs games that teach children about topics such as physics, history or different languages. The company's team and founders are gaming veterans with backgrounds at industry leaders such as Rovio and Gameloft while their scientific advisors are leaders in their academic fields at institutions such as Harvard University and the University of Helsinki. A highlight of the week was the visit and discussions at Nokia’s headquarters in Espoo where the students heard from two senior and inspiring female leaders: Anne Pakari, head of Nokia’s Innovation Collaboration Ecosystem for Finland and Tuuli Ahava, head of Events Orchestration at Nokia. They touched on many fascinating topics, including the change of culture at the company from when it was a mobile phone driven business to what it is today - a telecom and network business. They also explained how the company is positioning itself today and how the innovation ecosystem is organized and explained the significance of fresh thinking, growing new talent and reskilling as well as providing a work environment that nurtures talent.

During the week, students also got to experience some of the culture and sights of Stockholm and Helsinki with two organized tours. In Stockholm, the students visited the City Hall and wandered through the oldest area of Stockholm, Gamla Stan and saw many famous landmarks including the Parliament, Royal Palace on the waterfront, the Vasa Swedish warship and the house of Alfred Nobel, inventor of dynamite and founder of the Nobel Prize. In Helsinki, students visited Senate Square and learned about the beautiful buildings and neoclassical architecture and its surroundings which make up the oldest part of central Helsinki. The week concluded with a farewell dinner at Savotta restaurant off Senate Square in Helsinki. The name Savotta means a logging site and in the decor of Savotta one can see the genuine old artefacts dating back to Finnish homes and logging sites from the old days. Some students also visited Tallinn, the capital and largest city of Estonia.

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Sunday, September 10 - Saturday, September 16, 2017, South Korea

33 students and an alumnus visit Seoul for the CGM’s Global Immersion course “Business Opportunities and Risks Competing with Government-Supported Monopolies: The Case of South Korea,” led by Jerry Nickelsburg, adjunct full professor of economics and director, UCLA Anderson Forecast

The CGM’s Global Immersion course, “Business Opportunities and Risks Competing with Government-Supported Monopolies: The Case of South Korea,” led by Jerry Nickelsburg, adjunct full professor of economics and director of the UCLA Anderson Forecast traveled during the same week in September to South Korea. The course attracted 33 students from UCLA Anderson’s fully employed and executive MBA programs as well as one alumnus from South Africa. This was the first time that a global immersion course had focused on and visited South Korea.

During the week in Seoul, students heard from business leaders across various sectors, as well as government officials and university professors. The inaugural speaker was Mark Canning, the cultural affairs officer for the U.S. State Department. At the Ambassador’s Residence, Canning addressed the geopolitical outlook for the region and how companies investing in or trading with South Korea mitigate risks. Students asked many questions touching on topics such as the tensions between the North and South and the country’s relations with China. Students also had the opportunity to hear from UCLA alumnus Dr. Lief Eric Easley (B.A. ’01), an assistant professor of international studies at Enhwa University who discussed the evolving role of relations with Japan and China in terms of political and economic policy. The group also heard from two UCLA Anderson alumni: Dr. Il SaKong (Ph.D. ’69, MBA ’66), chairman of the Institute for Global Economics and former finance minister of Korea who provided a macroeconomic overview of the Korean economy in a historical perspective, and addressed Korea’s major economic strategies and policies and the role of Chaebols; and Jae Won Lee (’99), CEO of Hyundai Life Insurance who discussed financing foreign business in Korea, Korean monetary policy and exchange rates. Other guest speakers throughout the week addressed topics such as geopolitical stability in the region, gender diversity, leadership styles and management issues related to cross-cultural interaction and competing with and selling to the large chaebols. Paul Kim, manager of strategic planning at CAOLION Cosmetics provided insights on the strategy and drivers behind the company’s success in Korea and abroad as well as a perspective on the Korean consumer and marketing techniques employed in South Korea. Students also heard presentations from and visited companies such as Continental Automotive in Icheon where its CFO Ludwig Feuchtmeyer discussed the opportunities, challenges and strategies for foreign direct investment as a tier one supplier to the Korean OEM industry; Hyosung Corporation where they learned about the importance of energy storage to the success of alternative energy and the drivers behind Korea’s leadership in this industry; Boeing Corporation where they heard how Boeing and Korea are connected across the value chain; and Shinhan Bank where they learned about the Bank’s efforts to drive growth and foreign investment in Korea. Students also visited BMW where the need and strategies to partner with Korean companies such as Samsung were addressed and later heard from David Kim, executive vice president of Marsh Korea who discussed the risks confronting Korea’s economy. At the end of the week, students interacted with a panel of expats from companies such as Johnson Controls, Stratasys and Kolon Industries who shared more about the ex-pat experience, living in Seoul, speaking Korean, and doing business in South Korea.

During their time in Seoul, students also experienced some of the sights and culture of the country with a visit to Gyeongbok Palace, the Folk Museum and Insa-dong Street. They also enjoyed Korean BBQ in Gangnam and a farewell dinner at the HanCook N Seoul Tower to experience a panoramic view of the city. Students also visited the Korean War Memorial and were given a tour of the Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) where they entered the 3rd Infiltration Tunnel and visited the Dorasan Station, which used to connect North Korea with South Korea.

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Sunday, September 3 - Sunday, September 10, 2017, Peru

26 students visit Lima and Cusco for the CGM’s Global Immersion course “The Economic Environment and Business Opportunities in Peru,” led by Andres Terech, adjunct associate professor of marketing

During the first week of September, the CGM’s Global Immersion course, “The Economic Environment and Business Opportunities in Peru,” led by Andres Terech, adjunct associate professor of marketing traveled to Peru. This was the third time that a global immersion course had focused on and visited the country. The course attracted 26 students from UCLA Anderson’s full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs. During the week, students heard from a variety of speakers spanning many different industries, important to the country’s economy. The week began with a visit to the Central Bank where students were given an overview of Peru’s business, investment and political climate as well as the country’s history. Students later heard from Ismael Benavides, former minister of economy and finance; director of Grupo Huamani; and a guest speaker at the CGM’s 2017 Latin American Business Conference who talked about the history of the Peruvian economy, measures that it needs to take to shift back into high gear and whether it can avoid its dependence on international prices of minerals and commodities. In Lima, the students also heard presentations from: EY on the cost of corruption in Peru and its impact on businesses, public services and foreign investment; TASA, a leader in the fishing sector in Peru on the company’s strategy and challenges it faces with sustainability in the sector; Mibanco and the climate for microfinance in the country; as well as Transporta de gas del Peru and the opportunities and challenges in the energy sector and future of sustainable and renewable energy in Peru. The students also had the opportunity to converse with a diverse group of entrepreneurs who discussed what it takes to start and grow a business in Peru today and the funding they receive from Start-Up Peru. UCLA Anderson alumnus Silvana Rondon (FEMBA’13), agency lead for Google Peru addressed the group for a discussion titled, “Mapping the Inca trail and selling digital ads: Opportunities and challenges in the digital economy in Peru,” which was followed by a networking reception. Alumni were also invited to join. At the Universidad de Piura, students learned from UCLA Anderson alumnus, Gabriel Natividad (Ph.D. ’08; M.A. ’05), professor of economics about a Peru beyond commodities and the country’s economic and strategic considerations for growth and prosperity after 2,000 years of natural resource extraction.

Guest lectures were complemented by a number of site visits. These included visits to AJE Group, a large multinational beverage company were students learned how Peruvian companies can compete with large international players and its strategy for maintaining and increasing market share. They were also given an informative tour of its facilities and main products including the sports drink "Sporade" and water line "Cielo" and witnessed the labelling, bottling and packaging processes. They also visited Buenaventura Mining, the largest owner of mining rights in Peru among precious metals companies, listed on the NYSE and heard how a Peruvian mining company can compete in a capital intensive and risky business, led by large multinational companies. At Johnson & Johnson, the group heard from Martin Faes, country manager who provided an overview of Johnson and Johnson, its global reach and product portfolio and shared what a consumer packaged goods company needs to do to reach all consumers in Peru. He also spent some time discussing the Magdalena market where the students had visited earlier in the day and described the day-to-day spending habits of the Peruvians who shop at the market’s traditional stores.

In Cusco, students heard from CARTUC, the tourism chamber and were given an overview of tourism in Cusco and its impact on the local economy; and also from Medlife who discussed how the indigenous communities in the country are impacted by the advancement of modern businesses in their territories, the importance of education and access to treated water, which is an issue for millions of Peruvians.

During their time in Peru, students experienced local culture, visited key historical sites and enjoyed some local cuisine. In Cusco, the students enjoyed a city tour and visited the Korikancha Temple of the Sun, San Pedro market, Sacsayhuaman and the Cristo Blanco viewpoint. The week concluded with a day trip to the ancient Inca ruins of Macchu Picchu where they enjoyed a guided tour around its terraces, corridors, temples, solar clock of “Intihuatana” and other sacred places.

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Monday, August 21, 2017, Executive Dining Room and Terrace

The CGM Hosts an Evening of Networking with International Exchange Students and Students from ESSEC Business School’s EMBA and Digital Leadership Programs and UCLA Anderson’s EMBA and UCLA-NUS EMBA Programs

The Center for Global Management welcomed 58 students from the EMBA and Advanced Certificate in Digital Leadership programs at ESSEC Business School, France to UCLA Anderson from August 20-25 for a one-week global management seminar focused on “The Business of California.” The week provided participants with an opportunity to complete part of their studies at UCLA and gain valuable global experience and insights. The week focused on the innovation and creativity that is such an integral part of the business community in Los Angeles and California, including current academic research and business application around topics such technology and business model driven innovation and its impact on the global mobile industry, the proliferation of big data and its efficient intermediation, as well as idea generation and the fundraising process. During the week, students visited Clutter, Tesla, Warner Brothers and Amgen. On Monday, August 21, the students enjoyed a networking reception in the executive dining room, organized by the CGM where they had an opportunity to meet and connect with international exchange students from eight partner schools that the CGM was hosting for the week, as well as interact with students from UCLA Anderson’s Los Angeles-based EMBA program and students from the classes of 2017 and 2018 of the UCLA-NUS EMBA program who were on campus for their two week UCLA residency.

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Sunday, July 16, 2017, Dickson Plaza, UCLA

CGM Engages with the New Incoming FEMBA and EMBA Classes of 2020 and 2019 at FEMBAPalooza

On Sunday July 16, UCLA Anderson celebrated another successful FEMBApalooza, with around 1,000 adults and 1,200 people total, including children in attendance. The sixth annual fun-filled family event, held on UCLA’s Dickson Plaza, served as the official welcome event of the FEMBA Class of 2020 and showcased the people and available resources of the Fully Employed MBA program. The event brought together FEMBA students and alumni from all of UCLA Anderson’s programs, including the Full-time MBA, FEMBA, EMBA, UCLA-NS GEMBA, Ph.D., MFE and MSBA, including members of the Class of 1983, 1984 and 1985 and over 250 incoming FEMBA and EMBA students from the recently admitted Classes of 2020 and 2019 respectively. Faculty, family and friends joined. This year, the EMBA program also had strong representation welcoming its new incoming class of 2019. The Center for Global Management conducted a “Learning on the Learn” mini TEDx-type session on the global opportunities available at UCLA Anderson and talked about the international programming available both on and off campus, including the global immersion and FEMBA international exchange courses. Brittany Blackamore from the FEMBA Class of 2016, joined Lucy Allard and talked about her engagement with the CGM and her participation in five global immersion courses and two international exchanges, as well as her decision to pursue the specialization in global management: it expanded her world to new countries, opened her mind to macroeconomics, deepened her global acumen and gave her the confidence she needed to land a good job with a great future. The CGM also managed a booth to showcase and highlight the global courses, programming and opportunities available at UCLA Anderson to students across degree programs. The grand prize for the afternoon was a FEMBAPalooza Global Immersion Fellowship which covers the program fee for the in-country component of a global immersion course. It was won by Brett Jellen, who will join the new incoming FEMBA Class of 2020 and who is very excited to participate in his first global immersion course as a FEMBA student. Over the years, through the global immersion and FEMBA international exchange courses, as well as GAP, FEMBA students have traveled to over 35 countries.

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2016 - 2017

 
Monday, June 5, 2017, 8:00 AM, California Club

“Destined for War? China, the U.S. and Thucydides Trap" with Graham Allison, Founding Dean of Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and Director, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs

China and the U.S. appear destined for war in the next decade - according to Dr. Graham Allison, the Director of Harvard's Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. On Monday, June 5, FEMBA students attended another LAWAC breakfast discussion where Dr. Allison discussed this terrifying idea and how it might come to pass - and how it might be avoided. The U.S. has been the lone superpower since the end of the Cold War, but China is catching up fast – faster than most Americans yet realize, according to Graham Allison, the founding dean of Harvard’s Kennedy School. And that is a problem, because throughout history Professor Allison can show multiple examples of established powers being challenged by rising powers, and war ensuing. “There is no person in Washington who wants war with China, and there is no person in Beijing who wants war with the US. Both sides are very clear that this would be a catastrophe,” Allison told the LAWAC Global Café breakfast meeting. He talked about the lessons learned in how to prevent armed confrontation between the U.S. and China. According to Dr. Allison, the two world powers are stuck in a historical pattern which he named "The Thucydides Trap", taken from the Greek historian Thucydides (460-395 BC), who said that the rise of Athens in the fifth century BC threatened the ruling power of Sparta to the point that war became "inevitable". Dr. Allison and his team at Harvard point to 16 cases of a rising power threatening an established power in the past 500 years, and found that in 12 cases war ensued. With both Xi Jingping and President Trump promising to do whatever it takes to make their countries "great again", the case for war is not just a possibility, it seems likely. However, Allison also points out that enlightened statecraft avoided war in four of the 16 cases his team examined.

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Friday, June 2, 2017, 8:00 AM, Akasha Café and Restaurant

“Confronting Authoritarianism Around the World” with Thomas Ricks, Adviser on national security at the New America Foundation

As a member of the LAWAC, the Center for Global Management supported students from the fully employed MBA program to attend an LAWAC breakfast on Friday, June 2 at the Akasha Café and Restaurant in Culver City where they heard from Thomas Ricks, one of America's top journalists covering the military. Ricks is a Pulitzer-prize winning journalist and former correspondent for the Washington Post and the Wall Street Journal. He discussed the unique set of challenges facing the U.S. armed forces today, and how the Trump administration is likely to handle these challenges. Ricks also talked about his new book, Churchill and Orwell: The Fight for Freedom, a dual biography of Winston Churchill and George Orwell and how they fought for democracy against the threats of authoritarian rule in the 1930's and 40's - a theme that is again becoming urgent with the rise of authoritarian rulers in Russia and across Asia. Thomas E. Ricks is an adviser on national security at the New America Foundation, where he participates in its "Future of War" project. He was previously a fellow at the Center for a New American Security and is a contributing editor of Foreign Policy magazine, for which he writes the prizewinning blog The Best Defense. A member of two Pulitzer Prize-winning teams, he covered U.S. military activities in Somalia, Haiti, Korea, Bosnia, Kosovo, Macedonia, Kuwait, Turkey, Afghanistan, and Iraq. He is the author of several books, including The Generals, The Gamble, and the number one New York Times bestseller Fiasco, which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. The Center for Global Management is a member of the Los Angeles World Affairs Council, which provides significant benefits to students, especially those pursuing the specialization and certificate in Global Management, supporting their attendance at high-profile speaker events and private receptions.

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Thursday, May 25, 2017, 4:30 PM, North Lawn 

Celebrating Israeli Independence Day at UCLA Anderson

In celebration of Israel's Independence Day, which took place on Tuesday, May 2, the Jewish Business Student Association (JBSA) organized an Israeli-themed Anderson Afternoon on Thursday, May 25, 2017. Independence Day is the national day of Israel, commemorating the Israeli Declaration of Independence in 1948. 2017 marks the 69th anniversary of the historic declaration and establishment of a Jewish state in the land of Israel. 2017 also marks the 50th anniversary of the Six-Day War, also known as the 1967 Arab-Israeli War during which the Israeli Army was able to liberate the eastern part of Jerusalem, including the old city and the Wailing Wall, and unify the entire city under Israeli sovereignty. During March Spring break, over 90 UCLA Anderson students and significant others joined five first year full time MBA Israeli students and visited Israel on the 2017 Israel Trek organized by the Jewish Business Student Association (JBSA). The mission of JBSA is to build and sustain a community that enhances the professional, social and educational experience of Jewish students at UCLA Anderson. Given the significant interest in the trek and demonstrated interest among UCLA Anderson students in learning more about Israel, the JBSA wanted to share more about Israel's unique history and culture and make it accessible to the wider UCLA Anderson community. The Anderson Afternoon enjoyed Israeli food and music, trivia items and flyers that documented the history of the country and the importance of the Independence Day. Students were also given the opportunity to participate in a traditional game of "Matkot" and experience a virtual tour of Jerusalem and Tel Aviv using a Virtual Reality headset. The event, hosted by JBSA was supported by the CGM.

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Thursday, May 25, 2017, 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM, A-301, Collins Center

Global Management Lecture Series: “Overview of the Technology Sector in Africa” Panel Discussion

Home to some of the world’s fastest growing economies, the face of the African continent is changing rapidly. Africa as a whole is projected by the International Monetary Fund to be the world’s second-fastest growing economy to 2020. This environment is creating unique business opportunities, particularly with the digital transformation gaining momentum across the continent. Technology media and telecommunications are the leading sectors by investment. From the surge in mobile banking, to the creation of delivery systems bypassing the need for a formal address, the tech sector is transforming challenges into ingenious business opportunities in Africa. On Thursday, May 25, 2017 Guy Kamgaing (’97), founder and CEO of Mobile-XL, a mobile SaaS company; Don Oparah (’06), co-founder and CEO of Venture Aviator, a strategy consulting firm focused on tech startups, and Ami Gosalia, head of growth at Tala, a data science and credit scoring company joined for a moderated lunchtime discussion and addressed an engaged classroom, filled to capacity with students from UCLA Anderson’s various degree programs as well as the broader UCLA community for a conversation focused on business opportunities in the technology sector in Africa. Professor Terry Kramer moderated the discussion that reviewed the infrastructure and technology resources in various African countries, the startup and venture capital scene, as well as the that role technology plays in making a lasting impact in people’s lives. The panel also addressed the latest trends in the tech space, and the role of technology in helping the continent to become a business powerhouse. The turnout, engagement and curiosity from the audience clearly demonstrates the interest among the UCLA Anderson community and broader UCLA campus in learning more about Africa and the in particular the technology sector in the region. The discussion was part of the Global Management Lecture Series and was a collaboration with UCLA Anderson’s Black Business Students Association (BBSA) and Anderson Tech Business Association.

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Wednesday, May 24, 2017, 7:30 PM, La Paella Restaurant

Students from CGM’s Spanish Language & Culture for Business I & II Classes Practice Linguistic Skills at a Communal Dinner

Language courses have been offered for more than 20 years. A beginning level elective course, “Spanish Language and Culture for Business,” is offered through the CGM and designed specifically for business students. The course was available to FEMBA, EMBA and full-time MBA students in the winter quarter, and a continuation class was offered during spring quarter. 38 students enrolled. The objective of the course is to familiarize students with Spanish language and culture at a practical level, focusing mainly on communicative proficiency, basic grammar and common vocabulary appropriate to daily scenarios, including informal and professional business settings. Given the strong correlation between language and culture, the course also introduces students to basic cultural understanding and business etiquette and provides role-playing opportunities for a variety of settings. The course is taught by Adrian Collado, a teaching associate in UCLA’s Department of Spanish and Portuguese who teaches classes in Spanish language, literature and culture. In Spanish Language and Culture for Business I and II, students also learned how to negotiate, introduce friends, and chat about family, housing, and food. The uniqueness of Latin American and European cultures was also demonstrated through a Latin American and Iberian Film Festival that students were able to attend. Following class on Wednesday, May 24, Marianne M. So, from the FEMBA class of 2017 who enrolled in both Spanish I and II, organized a communal dinner with Adrian and the students from both Spanish I and II classes at La Paella, a local Spanish restaurant where 18 students enjoyed a feast of ten different tapas and paellas, providing them the opportunity to practice and demonstrate their linguistic skills, learned during the two quarters.

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Monday, May 15, 2017, 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Korn Convocation Hall

Robertson Lecture Series on Global Business Leadership with Sherry Lansing, Founder and CEO, The Sherry Lansing Foundation; Former Chairman and CEO, Paramount Pictures "From Hollywood Groundbreaker to Philanthropist"

Sherry Lansing is the founder and CEO of The Sherry Lansing Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to cancer research, health, public education, and encore career opportunities. On Monday, May 15, 2017 Sherry Lansing joined Dean Judy Olian for a moderated discussion in Korn Convocation Hall, both dear friends of Marion Anderson who passed peacefully the previous day. Marion and her late husband, John are UCLA Anderson's pillars and namesakes. Dean Olian and Sherry shared some fond memories and paid tribute to Marion and the defining set of values that both Marion and John lived and inspired. During the conversation, Sherry discussed her career trajectory as the first woman to head a major motion picture studio (20th Century Fox, 1980-84); her success as an independent producer (Fatal Attraction, The Accused, Black Rain, First Wives Club); and her 13 year tenure as Chair and CEO of Paramount Pictures (1992 - 2005) - followed by her full-time focus on philanthropy, achieving the life she wanted.  The missions of The Sherry Lansing Foundation are cancer research funding (predominately through Stand Up to Cancer), which Sherry co-founded in 2008; public education (predominately via the EnCorps STEM Teachers Program), which Sherry founded in 2007; and encore career opportunities for individuals who are transitioning from their first and second professional chapters to continued professional engagement in their latter sixties, seventies, eighties and beyond. Sherry offered lessons from both her personal and professional life - as the first woman to head a major motion picture studio, leaving Hollywood to focus full-time on philanthropy and advance social causes, which was inspiring to many. She talked about her recently published biography, Leading Lady, written by award-winning writer, Stephen Galloway and left lessons on how to approach addressing differences and embracing diversity as a learning opportunity. Over 200 UCLA students, alumni, faculty, staff, as well as members of the Los Angeles World Affairs Council and the Los Angeles community gathered in Korn Convocation Hall for the event which was part of the CGM's Robertson Lecture Series on Global Business Leadership. The event was organized by the CGM and supported by the Los Angeles World Affairs Council and UCLA Anderson's Entertainment Management Association and Women's Business Connection.

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Thursday, May 11, 2017, 4:30 PM, Briskin Family Plaza

2017 International Food Festival Embraces and Showcases International Culture at UCLA Anderson

Each year, students from the International Business Association (IBA) organize UCLA Anderson’s International Food Festival (IFF). On May 11, 2017, the event drew around 250 students, faculty and staff who gathered at Briskin Family Plaza to enjoy an evening of fun and authentic cuisine from 12 different countries and regions around the world. This annual event showcases, celebrates and embraces the international culture and diversity of UCLA Anderson through a universal form of expression – food.

The CGM supported this year’s IFF, which featured cuisines from Armenia, China (Greater China and Sichuan Region), India, Indonesia, Israel, Japan, Korea, Latin America, Taiwan, Thailand and Tunisia. The Black Business Students Association (BBSA) also served wonderful Creole Cuisine. With their sumptuous seafood gumbo, one of the most popular dishes at the IFF, the BBSA won the Critics’ Choice Award as judged by select UCLA Anderson faculty and staff. A great collection of international beer and wine to pair with the food was also provided by the International Business Association. In addition to the authentic food sourced from the best restaurants across Los Angeles by student representatives from each country/region, cultural diversity was on display through the international music played in the background, unique decoration of each host table and the traditional costumes worn by the hosts and several members of the participating clubs, such as Japan America Business Association, European Business Association, South Asian Business Association, Greater China Business Association and Korean Business Student Association. In total, nine different UCLA Anderson student clubs participated together with the IBA, in addition to independent representation for Taiwan, Thailand, Indonesia and Tunisia.

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Wednesday, May 10, 2017, 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Dean’s Conference Room

Lunch Series with CGM Board Member, Brent Nelson Smith (’86), Co-Founder and Managing Partner LevelOne Capital Limited; Former Global Group Head of Corporate & Investment Banking DBS Bank Ltd. On “Global Investment Banking and Entrepreneurship”

On Wednesday, May 10, 2017 the Center for Global Management hosted a brown bag luncheon with advisory board member, Brent Smith (’86) who is based in Singapore and Vietnam. Since 2008, he has served as co-founder and managing partner of LevelOne Capital, a Pan-Asian investment and advisory firm, where he has specialized in startup and mezzanine opportunities in emerging markets with a focus on southeast Asia, particularly Vietnam and Singapore. Smith formerly served as global head of corporate and investment banking for DBS Bank, a Singaporean multinational bank and financial services company after spending almost 15 years with JPMorgan & Co., where he was a managing director in the investment banking and mergers and acquisitions groups, completing assignments in New York, Melbourne, Sydney, Singapore and San Francisco. First, second and third year students from the full-time and fully employed MBA programs, including CGM mentees and members of the Investment Finance Association, Entrepreneur Association and students interested in global management gathered to hear his career trajectory since graduating from UCLA Anderson in 1986. Smith shared his thoughts, insights and experiences as a global investment banker, investor, entrepreneur and strategic advisor and his experience living, working and doing business internationally. He shared many personal stories and experiences with the students as well as lessons learned throughout his successful global career of over 30 years across Asia, the United States and Australia, providing invaluable guidance to students and describing his transition from a big executive role to being in the entrepreneurial trenches. He also described how he needed to change his leadership style when transitioning from the U.S. to Asia and the importance of looking, listening and learning and appreciating the different thinking and ways of doing things in other cultures as well as the importance of having a global perspective and cultural sensitivity and awareness. The lunch was supported by the Investment Finance Association and the Entrepreneur Association.

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Thursday, May 4, 2017, 7:15 AM - 11:00 AM, The Westin Bonaventure Hotel & Suites

91st Annual World Trade Week Kickoff Celebration: “Southern California: The Hub of Global Trade”

On May 4, 2017, former British Prime Minister Tony Blair joined Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and Jack Dangermond, President of ESRI, the world’s leading company in geographic information systems (GIS) and more than 900 business leaders for the 91st Annual World Trade Week Kickoff Celebration at the Westin Bonaventure Hotel. More than 900 business leaders and members of the diplomatic corps kicked off a month-long celebration of world trade in Southern California, the largest celebration of its kind in the country. Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti delivered the welcoming remarks, advocating for increasing regional employment through exports and celebrating L.A. as a global city. The morning’s program also featured a conversation, moderated by Dean Judy Olian with the Rt. Hon. Tony Blair, former British Prime Minister (1997-2007) and founder of the Tony Blair Institute for Global Change. This non-profit organization is dedicated to making globalization work for the many, not the few. Blair discussed his focus bringing together the best ideas in both public and private policy sphere to provide answers to some of the today’s major global challenges. “One of the advantages of leaving office is you get to see much more of the world … to study it. And in my view, the single biggest characteristic of the world today is the scope and speed of change. Technology and migration are changing our lives," said the former Prime Minister. The UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management was a supporting organization. The CGM supported twenty UCLA Anderson students from the executive, fully employed and full-time MBA programs to attend the event and hear Prime Minister Blair's presentation which also included topics such as Brexit, and U.K. relations with the European Union and the United States. He also discussed his interest in bringing together the best ideas in both public and private policy spheres to provide answers to some of today's major global challenges. Ambassador Vilma Martinez, President of the Los Angeles Harbor Commissioners, was awarded the Stanley T. Olafson Bronze Plaque Award for her outstanding contributions to the world trade community in Southern California. The L.A. Area Chamber’s annual Kickoff Breakfast jump starts more than 30 events hosted by partnering organizations celebrating world trade in Southern California. World Trade Week dedicates itself to educating the public on the importance and benefits of global trade on the local and national economy through a series of educational programs and events.

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Tuesday, May 2, 2017, 7:30 PM, Writers Guild Theater

President Trump’s First 100 Days with a former adviser to Hillary Clinton, Josh Lockman, a senior Breitbart editor, Joel Pollak, and a political pollster, Dan Schnur

How has President Trump performed in his first 100 days? On Tuesday, May 2, 2017, the Los Angeles World Affairs Council hosted a panel discussion with a former adviser to Hillary Clinton, Josh Lockman, a senior Breitbart editor, Joel Pollak, and a political pollster, Dan Schnur. On October 22, 2016, Trump released a "contract with the American voter" in which he outlined his priorities for his first 100 days (view here). He has followed through on some of these pledges, notably on withdrawing from the Trans-Pacific Partnership and filling the vacancy on the Supreme Court. On other pledges he has faced challenges, including the attempt to repeal the Affordable Care Act and the proposed ban on travelers from 7 Muslim countries. The early days of his presidency have seen a rise in the Dow, questions about Russian interference with the election campaign, a decision to bomb Syria, cordial summits with the Japanese and Chinese leaders, an early replacement of the national security advisor and a torrent of early-morning tweets that have kept politicians, reporters and foreign leaders guessing about what will come next. As a member of the LAWAC, the Center for Global Management supported 7 students from the executive, fully employed and full-time MBA programs to attend the discussion and hear the very diverging views from the panelists of President Trump and his policies - reflecting the diversity of opinion nation-wide on the 45th President. One of the few areas of agreement from all the panelists was about how badly the media performed in reporting the campaign: “I am surprised at how uncurious journalists have become,” said Pollack. “Journalists are too interested in what they say about each other and not what the American people have to say.”

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Thursday, May 4, 2017, 4:30 PM, Anderson Afternoon Lawn

Celebrating Cinco de Mayo at UCLA Anderson

The Center of Global Management supported the Anderson Latino Management Association (ALMA) Cinco de Mayo Themed Anderson Afternoon. The event was held to promote an understanding of the meaning of the Cinco de Mayo celebration and to build familiarity with the Mexican American Heritage among the UCLA Anderson community. Cinco de Mayo is an annual celebration that is held on May 5 and is observed to commemorate the Mexican Army’s unlikely victory over French forces at the Battle of Puebla in 1862, under the leadership of General Ignacio Zaragoza. In the U.S., Mexican Culture and Heritage is celebrated on this day with parades in cities with significant Mexican American populations such as Los Angeles.

Over 370 UCLA Anderson students enjoyed traditional performances by the UCLA Folkloric group and music played by Mariachi musicians. Mexican food was served and each cocktail table had a small pinata filled with Mexican candy, and information about the meaning of Cinco de Mayo. In addition, students experienced hitting a piñata, a tradition that takes place in Mexican, Mexican American, and other Latin American celebrations. The event, hosted by ALMA, was supported by the CGM, MEMES and the Anderson Student Association.

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Friday, April 21, 2017, 11:30 AM – 8:00 PM, UCLA Anderson School of Management

2017 Wilbur K. Woo Greater China Business Conference: A NEW CHAPTER FOR U.S.-CHINA RELATIONS – INVESTMENT, GROWTH STRATEGIES AND COLLABORATION OPPORTUNITIES

On Friday, April 21, 2017, the Center for Global management hosted the eleventh annual Wilbur K. Woo Greater China Business Conference at the UCLA Anderson School of Management. The 2017 Conference, titled “A New Chapter for U.S.-China Relations: Investment, Growth Strategies and a Collaboration Opportunities,” brought together successful U.S. and Chinese business leaders, investors and influencers who shared their perspectives on the changing dynamics, implications and future of the U.S.-Sino relationship.

Speakers, including UCLA and UCLA Anderson alumni from across a variety of industries and sectors addressed an audience of around 400 attendees from the UCLA and business and investment communities, with discussions focused on investment opportunities and growth strategies that embrace cooperation, stimulate innovation, drive sustainable economic growth and facilitate cross-border growth in this new chapter for one of the world’s most important and strategic relationships.

Following a career panel lunchtime discussion for UCLA students with past and present leaders of UCLA Anderson’s Greater China Business Association (GCBA) and UCLA’s Chinese Students and Scholars Association (CSSA), the conference was officially opened by UCLA Anderson’s Dean Judy Olian; Michael Woo, Los Angeles’ first Asian-American city councilman, son of conference founder Wilbur K. Woo and dean of Cal Poly Pomona College of Environmental Design; and Pin Tai, president and CEO of Cathay Bancorp and CEO of Cathay Bank, a platinum sponsor of the 2017 conference. This was followed by an opening address that provided an overview and business perspective about China delivered by William Yu, economist with the UCLA Anderson Forecast; Elizabeth Harrington, U.S. Publisher at Large, Hurun Report; and Chan Fong, tax partner at PwC, also a platinum sponsor of this year’s conference.

Plenary and concurrent sessions throughout the afternoon addressed connecting the U.S. and China in the media and entertainment industry through capital, culture and innovation; driving innovation and change through the development of new strategies, technologies, products and business models; as well as a review of cross-border investment trends, patterns and opportunities and the various investment financing strategies. Speakers also discussed the surging Chinese investment in U.S. real estate markets and thoughts on how U.S.-China relations will evolve under the new administration as the relationship faces increasing uncertainty and complexity. The conference was followed by a networking reception in UCLA Anderson’s executive dining room.

The conference featured executives from Alibaba USA, Cathay Bank, CEC Capital China Telecom Americas, China UnionPay USA, Coolpad Americas, Cox Castle & Nicholson LLP, DMG Entertainment, Elite International Investment Fund, Hurun Report, IMAX Entertainment, Landsea Holdings, NantHealth, PwC, RedBridge Capital LLC, Shiang Law, Sony Pictures, World Trade Center Los Angeles and the UCLA Anderson School of Management.

Born in China in 1916, the late Wilbur K. Woo received his bachelor’s degree in business administration from UCLA. He was vice chairman emeritus of Cathay Bank and Cathay Bancorp Inc. and was known for his decades of leadership in the Chinese-American community. Wilbur and his wife, Beth, who sadly passed away in March, endowed the Wilbur K. Woo Greater China Business Conference at UCLA Anderson to show their gratitude for the training that Wilbur received at his alma mater many years ago, with the goal of promoting understanding of the economic ties between the Greater China region and United States.

The 2017 Wilbur K. Woo Greater China Business Conference was organized by the Center for Global Management at UCLA Anderson School of Management in association with UCLA Anderson’s Greater China Business Association (GCBA) and UCLA’s Chinese Students and Scholars Association (CSSA). PwC and Cathay Bank were platinum sponsors and Cox Castle & Nicholson LLP and Landsea were bronze sponsors of the conference. The China Enterprise Council, UCLA Asia Pacific Center and UCLA Center for Chinese Studies were supporting organizations.

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Sunday, March 26 - Saturday, April 1, 2017

Students Visit Hong Kong for the CGMs Global Immersion Course "Hong Kong: A Business Center and a Gateway to China," led by Richard Rumelt, Professor of Strategy

During spring break, 49 current students from UCLA Anderson's full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs visited Hong Kong as part of the CGM's Global Immersion course "Hong Kong: A Business Center and a Gateway to China," led by Richard Rumelt, Professor of Strategy and Harry and Elsa Kunin Chair in Business and Society. This was the fourth Global Immersion course to focus on and visit Hong Kong, hosted by the Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK).  The Sunday prior to the first day of the course was an important day for Hong Kong with the election of Hong Kong's new Chief Executive. Carrie Lam was voted in by a large margin.

During the one- week in country, students heard from and engaged with many distinguished and influential business and government leaders. Students also heard from CUHK faculty members on topics ranging from doing business in China and Sino-U.S. relations to fashion in China looking at sustainability, risk and the future and later on in the week, a comparison of China's stock issuers and equity markets. Sessions took place at CUHK's campus in the New Territories as well as in CUHK's MBA Town Centre facility in Admiralty. Guest lectures were complemented by a number of site visits, including to the Hong Kong Stock Exchange and Clearing (HKEx) and the Hong Kong Science and Technology Park which is driving the development of Hong Kong into a regional hub for innovation and growth in several focused clusters. Students also visited Hysan Development Co., a leading property investment, management and development company in Hong Kong and one of the largest commercial landlords in the city's prime office/retail district of Causeway Bay.  Vincent Ho, a quadruple Bruin, who graduated from the FEMBA program in 1994 and now serves as Head of Corporate Safety for the MTR Corp. Ltd., hosted the group for a site visit at one of the MTR depots. Vincent provided a fascinating and informative overview of the MTR Corp. Ltd. which is responsible for metro railway operations serving 5.5 million passengers daily in Hong Kong.  

During the week, students had the opportunity to hear from many other successful alumni, including Leland Sun ('86), Managing Director of the Pan Asian Mortgage Company, an innovative non-banking financial services company specializing in residential mortgage financing in Hong Kong. Leland, the recipient of the 2017 UCLA Anderson Outstanding Alumni Service Award shared his perspective on the financial services sector in the region and the pivotal role of Hong Kong and touched on FinTech.  David McCloskley, Director of Product Marketing and Business Operations, Asia Pacific and Japan for Intel Corp. also addressed the group and shared his story about how he ended up in HK, came to Asia in 2009 and his perspectives on Asia and Hong Kong. Other high profile speakers included: Christine Loh, Under Secretary for the Environment, HKSAR Government whose direct policy responsibilities include air quality, energy, climate change and biodiversity;  Richard Elman, Chairman of the Noble Group who shared his fascinating journey since leaving the UK in the mid-1960s to founding the Noble Group, where he has overseen its development from an Asian based bulk commodity trading company into one of the key players in the global seaborne trade in metals and ores, energy and agricultural products; and Anna Wu, non-Official member of the Executive Council, HKSAR Government and also the current and founding chair of the Competition Commission who served as a member of the Legislative Council of Hong Kong and in that capacity initiated the Equal Opportunities Bill, the first private member's bill covering an area of policy. Anna is also a member of UCLA's Global Advisory Board and gave an extremely informative history of Hong Kong which provided great context to where Hong Kong is today.  Janet Yuen, Asia Pacific Head of Business Innovation, Digital for HSBC Corp. Ltd. talked about HSBC's digital strategy in Asia, a fast growing area in the banking industry.  

On the Thursday evening, alumni gathered at CUHK's facility in Admiralty for a presentation and discussion on "Strategy and Corporate Innovation" with Professor Rumelt. This was followed by a networking reception, hosted by the CGM in Sheung Wan. 11 alumni and 1 recently admitted student joined the evening. Students also got to experience some of the culture and sights of Hong Kong, including a tour of Wong Tai Sin Temple, Nan Lian Garden, Local Wet Market and Shanghai Street. The tour ended near the Avenue of Stars in Tsim Sha Tsui before the welcome dinner at a Cantonese restaurant in the Hong Kong Cultural Center with a spectacular backdrop of Victoria Harbor where the students had full view of the "Symphony of Lights."  Students also enjoyed horse racing at the Hong Kong Jockey Club at Happy Valley, first built in 1845 to provide horse racing for the British people in Hong Kong. The week highlighted the strength and influence of UCLA Anderson's alumni network and was a testimony to the presence and brand of UCLA in Hong Kong.

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Sunday, March 26 - Saturday, April 1, 2017

47 Students Visit Argentina and Uruguay for the CGM’s Global Immersion Course “The Challenges and Opportunities of Doing Business in Latin America – Focus on Argentina and Uruguay,” led by Argentinian Professor, Andres Terech, Adjunct Associate Professor of Marketing

The CGM’s Global Immersion course, “The Challenges and Opportunities of Doing Business in Latin America – Focus on Argentina and Uruguay,” led by Andres Terech, Adjunct Associate Professor of Marketing from Argentina also traveled during spring break. The course attracted 47 students from UCLA Anderson’s full-time, fully employed and executive MBA programs. This was the third time that a Global Immersion course had visited Argentina however was the first time that it had also focused on and visited Uruguay.

During the week, students heard from a variety of speakers spanning many different industries, important to the country’s economy. Speakers addressed topics such as the economic environment, investment climate and risk management in Argentina, Argentina’s workforce and talent pool, the agriculture and farming industries, very important sectors in Argentina as well as real estate investment. UCLA Anderson alumnus, Juan Procaccini (’01), President of the Argentina Investment Trade and Promotion Agency talked with the class about the investment environment as well as the political and business climate in the country. Students also heard from a panel of entrepreneurs in El Centro Metropolitano de Diseno which provides space for the growing startup scene. They had the opportunity to visit Tenaris and enjoyed a plant tour, as well as visits to technology firm Globant and to Daravi, where students learned about social entrepreneurship in the country. In the middle of the week, the group took the Buquebus to Montevideo and visited Zoneamerica, toured its campus and heard from Tata Consulting. They also enjoyed a fascinating talk by Ernesto Talvi, Director, Brookings Captial, CERES Economic and Social Policy in Latin America Initiative who provided an overview of the Latin America landscape and heard from Carlos Faroppa, Director of Madimex S.A. and President of the Uruguay Society of Timber Growers, who discussed the forestry sector and made comparisons between Argentina and Uruguay.

On the Thursday evening, Professor Terech moderated a panel discussion with UCLA Anderson alumni at the Peugeot Lounge in the Palermo district of Buenos Aires. Alejandro Burato (’05), Managing Director of Burato.net; Juan Marrone (’99), CEO, Celnova Pharma; and Martin Ruete (’00), Financial Planning Director, Despagar shared their experiences at UCLA Anderson, what UCLA has meant to them, why they returned to Argentina and their views on the country’s future. A reception followed the discussion, where current students were joined by alumni and prospective students for an evening of networking. During their time in Buenos Aires, students also experienced some of the sights and culture of the country with a visit to Plaza de Mayo, La Casa Rosada Presidential Palace, the Recoleta cemetery as well as the neighborhoods and districts of San Telmo, Palermo and La Boca. The group also enjoyed wine tasting. Tango lessons at the farewell dinner where students learned the basic steps of the tango dance provided the perfect close to the week.

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Sunday, March 26 - Saturday, April 1, 2017

Students Visit Japan for the CGMs Global Immersion Course "An Indebted, Aging, Post-Industrial, Bubbling Economy: Lessons for the United States from Japan," led by Ed Leamer, Distinguished Professor and Economist

During spring break, 50 current students from UCLA Anderson's full-time, fully employed, executive and UCLA-NUS global executive MBA programs visited Japan for the CGM's Global Immersion course "An Indebted, Aging, Post-Industrial, Bubbling Economy: Lessons for the United States from Japan," led by Ed Leamer, Distinguished Professor, Chauncey J, Medberry Chair in Management and Director of the UCLA Anderson Forecast. This was the third Global Immersion course to focus on and visit Japan.

During the week, students heard from and engaged with many distinguished and influential business leaders including Mr. Jack Mickle, CEO of Ogilvy & Mather Japan and Ms. Naoko Ito, head of strategy who presented the different approaches Ogilvy takes when creating global versus local (Japanese) campaigns. Students visited IBM and heard from Mr. Jon Robinson, IBM's Chief Marketing officer as well as visited CISCO and its innovation center and heard from Ms. Miyuki Suzuki, president and GM of Cisco Japan. The group also visited Mr. Masaru Otsuka, Head of Digital Acceleration at Takeda Pharmaceutical, and heard a presentation from Mr. Tasuku Kuwabara, a partner at McKinsey on the current scope of the Japanese health system, and how "Abenomics" affects the health system. Students met with American Foreign Officers from the U.S. Embassy at the American Center to hear about the economic situation of Japan and the geo-political landscape, including Prime Minister Abe's actions since he took office. At Toyota, the group learned about the company's initiative of Ha:mo (Harmonious Mobility Network) and at BMW they heard from Mr. Peter Kronschnabl, President of BMW Japan. Students also visited and toured Kikkoman's production facilities and heard from Mr. Osamu Mogi, managing director and member of the founding Mogi family. They traveled to Kashiwa-no-ha Smart City, an urban development with sustainability at the forefront of its mission and visited the Kashiwa-no-ha Open Innovation Lab (KOIL), where UCLA's Japan Center is located. Dr. Kenji Yokouchi (PhD. Physics '02), the Center's director addressed the group at KOIL Studio.  Students also learned about recent urban development in Japan and toured the Smart City by Mitsui and visited Nihon Bashi, a modernized old town of the Edo period to enjoy a short tour and presentation of the urban plan by Mitsui to reinvigorate that area of Tokyo with new construction and development.  

At the beginning of the week on Monday, March 27, alumni gathered at Hotel Okura Tokyo for an evening presentation on "Aging Population, Asset Bubbles and a Post-Industrial Transition: Experiences Shared by Japan and the U.S.," delivered by Professor Leamer. This was followed by an alumni panel discussion with UCLA and UCLA Anderson alumni, including Mr. Steven J. Bass (Urban Planning Ph.D. '98), Partner-Real Estate Group, Orion Partners; Mr. Yoshinao Hayashi ('99), Managing Director, PAG Real Estate; Mr. Osamu Masaki ('84), Economist and Trustee of New-S Asset Management; and Mr. Max Ninomiya ('98), President & CEO, Max Reading Inc.  A networking reception in Akasaka followed the discussion. Around 20 UCLA and UCLA Anderson alumni and prospected candidates attended the evening.   

During the week, students also had the opportunity to hear from many successful alumni, including Mr. David Nichols ('92), President and Representative Director of State Street Global markets who discussed the economic state of Japan, consequences of an aging population and his thoughts on the growth and value areas for the future of Japan. Mr. Masuri "Vic" Murai ('62), Special Advisor of Ichiryu Associates and President of the Japan Alumni Chapter also addressed the class prior to the business visits to Kikkoman and Mitsui which he kindly facilitated.  He spoke of the cultural importance of Kikkoman soy sauce in the Japanese culture and its expansion into the U.S.. He also commented on the many research centers in Japan, each with various missions, i.e. healthcare or industrial work. Students also heard from Mr. Barrett Madrigal ('90), Operating Officer and Senior Director of Eli Lilly who gave a very engaging talk, drawing on not only his experience in the health industry, but also as an American who has lived in Japan for many years. He spoke about drivers of cost of healthcare in Japan, consequences and benefits of a universal healthcare system, and weaknesses in the current approach to providing health for its aging population.  

During their time in Japan, students got to experience some of the culture and sights of the country with a visit to the Ginza district, Asakusa Temple, Tokyo Tower and also experience a tea ceremony. The group reflected on their week's experiences and learnings during an authentic farewell dinner on a Yakatabune, a classic low barge style traditional Japanese boat. The week also highlighted the strength and influence of UCLA and UCLA Anderson's alumni network in Japan and witnessed the dedication, commitment, pride and warmth of the UCLA and UCLA Anderson alumni community.  

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Wednesday, March 8, 2017, 6:30 PM – 9:00 PM, UCLA Faculty Center

Global Business & Policy Forum “The Beginning of a New Europe: What Will Happen After Brexit?”

The Future of the European Integration project and the future of the Euro is, once again, one of the major global risks factors for 2017. British Prime Minister Teresa May has promised to formally initiate Brexit sometime in March. The first round of the French Presidential election will be held on April 23 and the German general elections must be held before October 22. Italy is in its usual turmoil, aggravated by the failed referendum and the stepping down of Prime Minister Renzi, and Spain has a fragmented parliament, a minority government, and the threat of Catalonian independence. Portugal might need another bailout and the Greek pile of debt remains as unsustainable as it ever was. Will the European project and the Euro make it through this year? What will it take to keep Europe together? What might happen if it comes apart? On Wednesday, March 8, the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management and UCLA School of Law's Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy hosted Javier Díaz Giménez, a professor of economics at IESE Business School, Spain who is on sabbatical as a visiting professor at UCLA Anderson School of Management through 2017 for the second global business and policy forum of the 2016-17 academic year. Diaz Giménez made a presentation where he addressed these questions and was then joined by Sebastian Edwards, Henry Ford II Chair in International Management for a discussion to provide more insights and perspectives on the future of Europe and what 2017 holds for the continent post Brexit. This was then followed by dinner with interactive table conversations where specific questions were discussed among students, including: “Would you join Club Europe for a yearly fee of $175? And what is wrong with quoting the price tag for membership in the Eurozone at this number?” “Will Chancellor Merkel win the next German Federal election? And will the next German Chancellor have to dance with Marine LePen?” “Will the EURO still exist in March 2022? And what is your most likely political and economic scenario for the current members of the European Union?” The discussion over dinner engaged over 70 engaged students, faculty and staff from the UCLA Anderson School of Management and the UCLA School of Law. Diaz Giménez obtained his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Minnesota in 1990 and has dedicated most of his professional life to research, teaching and advising in macroeconomics. His latest research explores the consequences of fiscal policy and pension system reforms. The Global Business and Policy Forum is a collaborative partnership between UCLA Anderson’s Center for Global Management and the UCLA School of Law's Lowell Milken Institute for Business Law and Policy.

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Friday, March 3, 2017, 9:30 AM – 5:30 PM, Korn Convocation Hall

2017 Latin American Business Conference: LATIN AMERICA: FROM UNCERTAINTY TO OPPORTUNITY

On Friday, March 3, over 500 prominent and influential leaders from both the private and public sector including distinguished UCLA and UCLA Anderson alumni gathered together with students, academics and members of the local business community in Korn Convocation Hall to address the opportunities and concerns of Latin America. The region continues its social transformation, improving infrastructure, developing human capital, and fostering economic conditions to bridge the gap between uncertainty and opportunity, shaping a brighter future for its people, business and trading partners. Speakers shared their experiences, insights and forecasts on the economic and social trends and main issues, as well as the business and investment opportunities for Latin America and its important and influential role in the global economy.

The conference which opened with a macro-overview of the region by Professor Sebastian Edwards, Henry Ford II Chair in International Management and faculty director of Center for Global Management, an organizer and sponsor of the conference, explored efforts underway to encourage new developments and advancements as Latin America prepares for a brighter future. The day included discussions on the region’s economic, trade, political and social prospects, with panels focused on Latin America’s rising role on the global media and entertainment stage, innovative strategies for reigniting the region’s growth and the region’s economic landscape and importance of sustainable and inclusive growth.

The keynote address was delivered by Alvaro Uribe Velez, former president of Colombia. Panelists included: Mike Medavoy (B.A. ’63), chairman and CEO of Phoenix Pictures, co-founder of Orion Pictures and former chairman of TriStar Pictures; former Connecticut senator Chris Dodd, president and CEO of Motion Picture Association of America Inc.; Paulo Cesar de Souza e Silva, president and CEO of Embraer S.A., Brazil; Fernando Fischmann, founder and chairman of Crystal Lagoons; Fabio Colletti Barbosa, former CEO of Abril Group and Santander Brazil; and Ismael Benavides, managing director of Grupo Huamaní Inc. and Peru’s former Minister of Economy and Finance.

Discussions were moderated by: Sebastian Edwards; Sanjay Sood, UCLA Anderson professor of marketing and faculty director of the Center for Management of Enterprises in Media, Entertainment & Sports (MEMES); Dean Judy Olian; and Alceu Lima (’92), investor, owner and former president of Barclays Brazil. Following the morning session, a networking luncheon was held on Briskin Plaza and the conference concluded with a networking reception. Dean Olian hosted a private luncheon for the speakers, moderators and student conference directors in the Dean’s Conference Room and UCLA Chancellor Gene Block and Mrs. Carol Block kindly hosted a private dinner for the distinguished speakers of the 2017 conference at the Chancellor’s Residence that same evening.

The event was organized by UCLA Anderson’s Center for Global Management, UCLA Anderson’s Latin American Business Association and UCLA’s Latino Business Student Association, in collaboration with the Los Angeles Chamber of Commerce. Conference sponsors included City National Bank, vtr.com, Port of Los Angeles, exceda, UCLA’s Latin American Institute and the Center for Management of Enterprise in Media, Entertainment & Sports.

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Wednesday, February 15, 2017, 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM, Executive Dining Room

Global Networking Reception for Students & Faculty – Strengthening Intellectual and Social Connections between Faculty and Students

A key objective of the Center for Global Management is to help strengthen the intellectual and social connections between faculty and students interested in global management. On February 15, 2017, prior to the opening of spring quarter course bidding, around 150 students, faculty and CGM partners gathered in the executive dining room for the center's annual global networking reception. The reception provided an opportunity for students to learn about the Specialization/Certificate in Global Management, on campus global management courses, the CGM's global immersion courses and exchange offerings and the many different global engagement opportunities available at UCLA Anderson. Students also met and interacted with the faculty who teach global courses as well as faculty and Ph.D. students who have global research and teaching interests. Professor Sebastian Edwards, the CGM's faculty director provided welcome remarks and an overview of the CGM's programming and introduced all faculty members to the students who provided brief overviews of their courses. The reception provided an opportunity for students currently enrolled in global courses and engaged with the center's programming to network and share their experiences with others.

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Wednesday, February 8, 2017, 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM, Executive Dining Room

World Today Discussion Series on “Trumponomics: What Do We Know and What Do We Need To Know About President Trump’s Economic Policy?” with Professors and Economists Ed Leamer and Jerry Nickelsburg, moderated by Professor Sebastian Edwards

Will economic policy really change under President Trump? And if so, how will it affect business and investment opportunities? On Wednesday, February 8, another packed room of over 130 students from UCLA Anderson’s full-time, fully employed, executive MBA as well as MFE and PhD programs and UCLA’s MA in Economics program gathered in the Executive Dining Room for a World Today Discussion Series on “Trumponomics.” Professors and Economists Ed Leamer and Jerry Nickelsburg joined CGM faculty director, Professor Sebastian Edwards for a “Davos-style” conversation on the future of the United States and the global economy. During the 75-minute long conversation and audience question time, the speakers addressed issues surrounding tax reform and border tax adjustment, protectionism, immigration, policy towards China, future of NAFTA, and relations with Mexico. Leamer suggested that President Trump should be concerned about U.S. savings and also workforce development and that the workforce these days needs to be innovators and analytical thinkers to compete against robots and gone are the days where rote learning, memorization is sufficient. The speakers also shared their thoughts on President Trump’s abandoning of the Trans-Pacific Partnership and predictions on what would happen to the U.S. dollar and whether a strong dollar was good for the United States. The World Today Discussion Series engages students in dialogue in an interactive, engaging and enriching discussion format around current global issues that transcend borders. Through the series, the CGM engages globally minded students with issues that matter and ideas that stimulate. Through balanced discourse, the series serves as a neutral forum to educate students on global issues while at the same time encourage debate and examination.

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Friday, February 3, 2017, 8:00 AM – 4:30 PM, Korn Convocation Hall

2017 Velocity Conference: Empower Together

The 2017 UCLA Anderson Women’s Leadership Summit, “VELOCITY: Empower Together” brought together over 400 business leaders, alumni faculty and students. The Center for Global Management was a supporting sponsor of this fifth annual energizing, thought-provoking and inspiring event which included keynote addresses delivered by Amy Powell (’05), President of Paramount Television and Digital Entertainment who used the specifics of her own life and career to illustrate universal lessons for those gathered, and Cynthia Marshall, Senior Vice President of Human Resources and Chief Diversity Officer at AT&T. Dean Olian opened the conference with remarks that acknowledged the reality that women face in the workplace and society and emphasized that “It’s a time when positive, strong leadership of women….and men…is needed.” The day-long conference also included a “Female Founders Roundtable” where business leaders, including many UCLA and UCLA Anderson alumnae discussed best practices and the unique qualities that have helped guide them in the journey to CEO. In other sessions, panelists explored how companies and individuals can leverage advances in technology and a widening network to build their social capital and during the panel on “Having A Global impact: Women in Sustainability,” the audience heard from women who are making waves in the global quest for sustainability who discussed recent wins, tough decisions and how women can become leaders for change. The presenting sponsor of the conference was AT&T, platinum sponsors included the Los Angeles Lakers and Oaktree and gold sponsors were Mercer and Google.

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Thursday, February 2, 2017, Anderson Afternoon, North Lawn

Celebrating Chinese New Year at UCLA Anderson

To celebrate the international culture and diversity of UCLA Anderson and promote familiarity with and understanding of the Chinese culture among students, the Center for Global Management supported the Greater China Business Association’s (GCBA) Chinese New Year-themed Anderson Afternoon. The event was held on February 2 on the North Lawn. The Chinese New Year is one of the most important festivals of the Greater China region. GCBA took this great opportunity to invite the UCLA Anderson community to join the celebration and promote the cultural diversity at Anderson. The UCLA Anderson courtyard was decorated with Chinese New Year décor and authentic Chinese food was served. To help the UCLA Anderson community better understand Chinese tradition, GCBA members prepared a variety of celebration games and activities, including learning Chinese calligraphy, reading Chinese puzzle, winning red pocket, and playing Chinese Majiang. The event attracted over 400 UCLA Anderson students, faculty and staff who participated and shared in the celebrations together. The event, hosted by the GCBA, was supported by the CGM, Anderson Student Association and the Office of Diversity Initiatives and Community Relations.

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Saturday, January 28, 2017 8:30 AM - 6:30 PM, Covel Commons at UCLA

The Los Angeles Global Health Conference, “Re-Designing Global Health: Innovations and Sustainability”

The second annual Los Angeles Global Health Conference, took place at UCLA on Saturday, January 28. This annual global health conference hosted in Southern California brought together around 400 individuals from various disciplines across academia, NGOs, business, and the public sector to discuss pressing health issues, both locally and globally. Organized by UCLA, USC, Claremont Graduate University and Pardee Rand Graduate School students, the conference aims to educate and connect with members of the UCLA, USC, Charles Drew University and Los Angeles communities about the varying health disparities both in our backyards and around the world. The UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management is a sponsor of the event. Home to people from more than 140 countries speaking 224 different languages, Los Angeles's rich cultural diversity makes it an ideal place to examine the current status of world health. The Los Angeles Global Health Conference provides an interactive educational forum where students, along with faculty and community members, join together to learn more about global health research and emerging solutions to improve the world’s health and provides a forum to discuss innovative ways to tackle health disparities—locally and globally. This year's conference "Re-Designing Global Health: Innovation and Sustainability” highlighted the myriad of current global health challenges that we face today. Keynote addresses focused on “Partnership, Diplomacy, and Sustainability: Redefining Global Health” and “Designing a Cultural Blindspot: Sanitation, Health and Water.” The closing keynote was delivered by Peter Laugharn, President and CEO of the Conrad Hilton Foundation. The day included numerous breakout sessions that focused around the key themes of cross-disciplinary approaches to innovations and sustainability; sustainability; and innovations. A breakout session on “Business Perspectives on Healthcare Innovation” was delivered by UCLA Anderson Professor Emeritis Victor Tabbush and Sarah Broadbent and Joshua Bivins, students from the full-time MBA class of 2017 who presented how business school students approach issues of global health with “A Business Approach to Healthcare in Underserved Communities: An MBA Case Study." Sarah and Joshua discussed elements of their AMR field study project with the Human Sciences Research Council. HSRC acts as a South African non-partisan, public-purpose organization that generates scientific knowledge through its research and analytical work in the social and human sciences. The students were tasked with identifying what sustainable, scalable business model can the HSRC create to provide screening, treatment and education on non-communicable diseases (NCDs) to the underserved, rural community of Sweetwaters, South Africa. The audience was extremely engaging and provided the students with some valuable guidance on their project and much food for thought in terms of the convergence of business and healthcare. The session highlighted how students can use their business school skills, knowledge and frameworks to develop sustainable business models that help with NCD screening and deliver an implementation plan that makes a positive impact in the area of global health. The conference was hosted by the UCLA Center for World Health and sponsored by the USC Institute for Global Health, the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health, the UCLA Anderson Center for Global Management and the UCLA International Institute with support from the UC San Diego Global Heath Institute and the UCLA Center for Global and Immigrant Health.

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Saturday, January 28, 2017 10:30 AM - 12:30 PM, Meyer & Renee Luskin Conference Center, UCLA

Launch of the Australian Global Alumni Strategy in North America

On Saturday, January 28, 2017, the Australian Global Alumni Strategy in North America was officially launched at UCLA with the Hon. Julie Bishop MP, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Australia. "Australia's international alumni are influencers and leaders. The Global Alumni strategy celebrates their achievements and grows an international community that continues a deep connection with Australia and strengthens Australia's connection with the region," says Bishop. The event was presented as part of G 'Day USA with the support of the American Australian Association, ADVANCE, Group of Eight Australia, CSIRO (the federal government agency for scientific research in Australia) and UCLA Anderson's Center for Global Management. Australia is home to some of the world's best universities, is a popular destination for students studying abroad and is a global leader in research. The event that was held at the new Meyer & Renee Luskin Center at UCLA attracted a full room of alumni and highlighted the benefits of an Australian education and celebrated the achievements of American and Australian alumni. UCLA Anderson students and alumni in the SoCal region who are either Australian citizens whom UCLA Anderson admitted in the last 16 years or who studied at either the Australian Graduate School of Management or Melbourne Business School since 1995 were invited to join the launch.  Earlier in January, the Center for Global Management hosted students at UCLA from the University of Sydney's Executive MBA program for a global management seminar that focused on "Creating Opportunity through Disruptive Technology."

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Thursday, January 26, 2017 5:00 PM – 6:30 PM, Executive Dining Room

World Today Discussion Series on "India's Currency Reform" with Professors Romain Wacziarg and Bhagwan Chowdhry, moderated by Professor Sebastian Edwards

When India's Prime Minister, Narendra Modi came to power in 2014, he was seen as a disruptive force pledging to overturn the status quo in India. On November 8, Modi was presiding over one of the fastest-growing major economies in the world, when he announced that 85% of Indian currency in circulation would have to be exchanged at banks for new bills not yet printed: 500 and 1,000 rupee bills (worth $8 and $15) would be banned the next morning. Now, two months after the cash ban was initiated, currency shortages remain, demand for services and businesses have dropped and businesses are folding. On Thursday, January 26, a packed room of over one hundred students from UCLA Anderson's full-time, fully employed and executive MBA as well as MFE and PhD programs gathered in the Executive Dining Room for the World Today Discussion Series on "India's Currency Forum" with Bhagwan Chowdhry, Professor of Finance and Romain Wacziarg, Hans Hufschmid Chair in Management. The "Davos-style" conversation, which elicited many thought-provoking questions from students was moderated by Sebastian Edwards, Henry Ford II Chair in International Management and addressed the positive and negative impacts of "India's Currency Reform" and the long term consequences of the measure on one of the fastest growing major economies in the world. In a country, where the informal sector is substantial, cash shortages have produced enormous hardships for families, prompted worries about the economy, and placed Modi's own political future at risk. Despite this, the move seems to remain popular, according to polls, and the prospect of moving more transactions toward a digital medium holds the promise of more transparent and efficient economy. The discussion touched on questions around whether Modi will live up to his promise to be a reformer of India's economy? Does the cash ban have the potential to transform India? Will such a move pave the way for other measures intended to restructure the economy? Will the pain stemming from the ban, be for the long-term good of the poor and powerless? Will Modi continue to command the political narrative and support of the country? Will India's demonetization pay off long-term by promoting digital payment systems that increase efficiency and transparency? Now Venezuela is following India, will other nations follow? The World Today Discussion Series engages students in dialogue in an interactive, engaging and enriching discussion format around current global issues that transcend borders. Through the series, the CGM engages globally minded students with issues that matter and ideas that stimulate. Through balanced discourse, the series serves as a neutral forum to educate students on global issues while at the same time encourage debate and examination.

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Tuesday, January 24, 2017 11:30 AM – 12:30 PM, Executive Dining Room

Brown Bag Lunch Series with Jon Niermann (’95), President & CEO, Loop Media, Inc.; Founder & CEO, FarWest Entertainment; Former President, Electronic Arts (EA) Asia; Former President, The Walt Disney Company Asia Pacific.

On Tuesday, January 24, the Center for Global Management ho