Research

Our faculty create impact through discoveries they make. Their research changes the way people think, and the way organizations act. Learn more about a few of our current faculty research projects below.

Impact Anderson

UCLA professor Bhagwan Chowdhry thinks he's got an idea that deserves some attention. He thinks he's figured out a way for issuers of securities to impact investors to provide a guarantee of the social impact that would yield higher financial returns if social impacts aren't met.

Watch Video
Impact Anderson
Now you can find out the air quality as easily as the weather

Magali Delmas talks about her new app and what really motivates green behavior.Read More Additional Content

Impact Anderson
Ever wonder how imagination works?

Hal Hershfield's latest research grant enables him to study the measure of imagination.

Read More

Impact Anderson
Plow vs. hoe: Farming practices and the evolution of gender inequality in the workplace.
Read More
Impact Anderson
Should you read this or not? Danny Oppenheimer can help you decide.
Read More
Impact Anderson
How retirement online tools are designed has a strong influence on how people choose to save.
Read More
Impact Anderson
This research proves you’re more productive when you know the sexual orientation of your co-worker.
Read More
Impact Anderson
Switching tracks: An essay on California high-speed rail.
Read More
Impact Anderson
Does success in life depend more on luck than on effort?

Read More
Impact Anderson

Social and environmental aspects of firms’ global supply chains are increasingly being recognized as key considerations to take into account when making business decisions. Some measures are relatively well-defined by now, such as carbon footprinting. Social considerations are more recently gaining increasing attention, in particular in the technology supply chain. Firms in the technology sector are constantly making decisions that have economic, environmental and social dimensions, and hence they are, explicitly or implicitly, trading off fundamentally different economic, environmental and social measures. The purpose of this project is to interview key stakeholders within technology firms, to better understand how they do this.

Professors Charles Corbett and Felipe Caro
Impact Anderson

We propose to study incentives for technology adoption in the commercial buildings sector. This study will evaluate the performance outcomes related to the adoption of energy efficient technologies, such as reduced energy consumption and investor performance, in terms of rent price premiums, occupancy rates and energy savings. Using a unique dataset constituting of 178,777 buildings in the City of Los Angeles, this research will also evaluate how different financing models can alleviate split incentives problems, a well-known barrier to the adoption of energy efficient technologies.

Professor Magali Delmas

What's Next

 
Impact Anderson

UCLA Receives $570,000 Grant

The Regents of the University of California received a $570,000 grant to conduct a study that will evaluate the effects of the higher minimum wage ordinance in the Los Angeles metropolitan region. The research initiative will be led by Edward Leamer, UCLA Anderson School of Management Distinguished Professor, Chauncey J. Medberry Chair in Management and UCLA Anderson Forecast director. Leamer will collaborate with Drs. Till von Wachter and Frederick Zimmerman, faculty members from the Department of Economics and School of Public Health at UCLA, and Jerry Nickelsburg of UCLA Anderson.

While increases in minimum wages are occurring in many locations, the Los Angeles experiment could be one of the most informative, since the city has an unusually large share of geographically concentrated low-wage workers. The the legislated increases in the minimum wage are projected to cover a greater fraction of workers here than in any other jurisdiction, and there are abundant locations near the city where jobs might go. The research will study the impact of the local minimum wage increase on a broad set of effects, including wage and employment levels, but also product prices and health outcomes.