January 2007


Los Angeles Times
Getting the Second Degree
Many MBA programs are focusing on global study to address the increasing global marketplace of business.  A great example of this is the UCLA-National University of Singapore (NUS) Executive MBA program.  “This is the way forward,” says Lucy Allard, a 2006 graduate of the UCLA-NUS program.    “This is for people at a stage in their careers where they’re already successful and they want to learn more…from a global perspective,” says Chris Erickson, professor, associate dean, and faculty co-director of the UCLA-NUS program.  This article appeared on Jan. 29 in a special supplemental section titled “Education.”

Los Angeles Times
Writing Your Own Ticket
Students preparing for careers in a variety of fields find that communication skills are important to master.  “Our mission as a business school is to provide managers for leadership roles…and that includes developing sophisticated and effective communication skills,” says Janis Forman, a professor with the Anderson School of Management.  Forman tells students that every word counts.   This article appeared on Jan. 29 in a special supplemental section titled “Education.”

Los Angeles Times
Executive MBA’s
Internationally focused MBA’s aren’t just for those climbing the career ladder; they can benefit those already at the top, as well.  At UCLA Anderson School of Management all Fully-Employed students take part in the Global Access Program (GAP).  “Students get an amazing first-hand experience in field research, learning how to manage a team and deal with an international client,” says Robert Spich, senior lecturer at Anderson and GAP program director.  This article appeared on Jan. 29 in a special supplemental section titled “Education.”

National Public Radio
Marketplace
Commenting on the new home sales figures released today by The Commerce Department, Edward Leamer, director of the UCLA Anderson Forecast, says that “sales will go up.”  This program aired nationally on Jan. 26.

Salon.com
The Same Old Song and Dance
Why are kids today so attracted to the syrupy songs and dance numbers in shows like Disney’s “High School Musical”?  “Tweens, especially girls ages 10 to 15, feel good listening and watching thinks like ‘High School Musical’.  At this age they are still optimistic,” says Scott Davis, a marketing professor at UCLA Anderson School of Management.  This article appeared on Jan. 22.

Los Angeles Times
Remember ‘Normal’?
After last year’s freefall in the local housing market, many believe the housing market will soon return to normal.  “Things will pick up before the end of 2007,” says Ryan Ratcliff, an economist with the UCLA Anderson Forecast.  This article appeared on Jan. 21.

The Associated Press
Miss America Pageant Tries (Again) to Rework Her Image
After years of struggling for relevance and viewers, the Miss America Pageant says it’s time to re-polish the brand by adding an interactive element to the show.  “If you look at ‘American Idol’ and a lot of other reality shows, it almost seems like they are looking for outrageousness as a characteristic, as opposed to poise, maturity, attractiveness and smarts,” says Ely Dahan, a marketing professor at UCLA Anderson School of Management.  This article appeared on Jan. 20.  A reprint appeared on Jan. 20 in the Las Vegas Sun.

The New York Sun
Bloomberg Enjoys Freer Rein Than L.A.’s Mayor
Even though the Mayor’s of New York and Los Angeles both enjoy high approval ratings and are seen as future political stars, the city governments they manage are very different beasts.  Government seems to play a smaller role in Los Angeles because it offers fewer services.  According to Daniel Mitchell, professor of management at UCLA Anderson, L.A.’s decentralized government can be traced to progressive reform movement in the early 20th century.  This article appeared on Jan. 19.

The Economist
Teach Us, Mr. Mayor
Mayors across the country are taking over their cities school systems, and having some very positive results.  William Ouchi, management professor at the UCLA Anderson School of Management, continues to argue that decentralization has saved American businesses; it can save schools too.  This article appeared on Jan. 18.

Los Angeles Business Journal
UCLA Anderson Forecast
Will the nation slip into a recession this year?  How will California fare through the continuing downturn in the housing market, and will the city of Los Angeles begin to feel more effect from this trend?  Economists from the UCLA Anderson Forecast, Edward Leamer, Ryan Ratcliff and Jerry Nickelsburg, offer their predictions in this special supplemental section.  This section appeared on Jan. 15.

The San Diego Union Tribune
Governor Goes Broke for Political Capital
Within days of taking the oath of office for the second time, Governor Schwarzenegger unveiled an ambitious agenda, pushing several expensive programs.   “He campaigned and complained about ‘tax, tax, tax’.  But what he’s given us is something new, which is ‘borrow, borrow, borrow,” says Edward Leamer, director of the UCLA Anderson Forecast.  This article appeared on Jan. 12.

Los Angeles Times
Gov.’s Budget Plan: No Deficit, More Debt
Gov. Schwarzenegger released a $143.4 billion spending plan that many feel uneasy about.  “The state is already on the razor’s edge in terms of fiscal balance,” says Ryan Ratcliff, economist with the UCLA Anderson School of Management.  “This would make things even more tenuous.”  This article appeared on Jan. 11.

The Associated Press
Schwarzenegger Wants to Build New Prisons, Schools, Dams
Gov. Schwarzenegger wants to borrow billions more to build new prisons, schools and dams to keep up with California’s population growth over the next 20 years.  “The tendency for the state to borrow is extremely unwise,” says Edward Leamer, director of the UCLA Anderson Forecast.  “It’s pushing spending on to the next generation, and that’s not fair and it’s not wise.”  This article appeared on Jan. 9, and was reprinted on Jan. 10 in the following publications: The Mercury News, San Bernardino County Sun, Tahoe Daily Tribune, The Desert Sun, The San Diego Union Tribune, North County Times, and The Press-Enterprise.  Broadcast coverage aired on Jan. 9 and included the following outlets: KFSN-TV (ABC) Fresno, KGO-TV (ABC) San Francisco, KCBS-TV (CBS) Los Angeles, KRXI-TV (FOX) Reno, and KTVU-TV (FOX) San Francisco.

Contra Costa Times
Real Estate in Transition, Experts Say
Most residential real estate professionals are calling 2007 a transitional year.  Edward Leamer, director of the UCLA Anderson Forecast, says he doesn’t foresee the residential real estate market changing dramatically.  “We expect that existing home prices will continue to slide just a little because buyers and sellers are looking in opposite directions,” says Leamer.  This article appeared on Jan. 10.

The Hindu Business Line
Global B-Schools Seek Indian Tie-Ups
India has become the destination for American and British business schools, as management education has gone global, and business schools seek to capitalize on the trend.  “Thanks to globalization, Indian students now have access to our programs,” says Judy Olian, dean of the UCLA Anderson School of Management.  Dean Olian, and Anderson professors Uday Karmarkar and Bhagwan Chowdhry visited India this winter to explore educational partnerships.  This article appeared on Jan. 8.

Los Angeles Times
Plenty of Prescriptions, But No Cures
Gov. Schwarzenegger’s latest plan to reform healthcare is just the latest in a long line of attempts.  According to UCLA Anderson School of Management professor Daniel Mitchell, a 1918 plan to establish healthcare for California residents was rejected by voters because it reputedly resembled German socialized healthcare.  This editorial appeared on Jan. 7.

San Francisco Chronicle
Balancing Budget Trickier This Year
Unlike previous years, California’s housing market is not likely to provide a fiscal windfall for the state this year.  “A strong housing market brought the state holiday gifts for four years now, but that time is up,” says Edward Leamer, director of the UCLA Anderson Forecast.  “That was the time to get the budget balanced.”  This article appeared on Jan. 7. 

U.S. News & World Report
Housing is Still Off Balance
Is the recent uptick in home sales a sign that the housing market is recovering?  Not according to Edward Leamer, director of the UCLA Anderson Forecast who predicts that real estate will be a “moderate to poor” investment in 2007.  “Over the last five years, a home was seen as an investment,” says Leamer.  “Now it’s just a place to live.”  This article appeared on Jan. 7.

Wall Street Journal
Economists See a Glow in Crystal Balls
According to the Journal’s latest semiannual economic forecasting survey, most forecasters expect 2007 to be a good – not great – year for the economy.  While one economist places the probability of a recession at 1 in 2, most believe the economy will prove more resilient.  “There’s no fat to trim,” says Edward Leamer, director of the UCLA Anderson Forecast.  This article appeared on Jan. 2, and was reprinted on Jan. 3 in The Plain Dealer.

The Orange County Register
Housing Dip Expected
Most experts watching the Orange County housing market predict that local home prices will decline in 2007, but this isn’t necessarily a solid prediction.  “This all hinges on whether we’ll see a major job loss in O.C. in the next couple of years,” says Ryan Ratcliff, an economist with the UCLA Anderson Forecast.  “…it’s too early to say for sure.”  This article appeared on Jan. 3.

Los Angeles Times
Four Speeches to Set Priorities for Governor’s Second Term
Gov. Schwarzenegger will lay out his policy ambitions in a series of speeches focusing on healthcare, infrastructure, and the environment, but none of his plans will be easy to pull off, as the state’s fiscal picture is grim.  “If things go well for him in the next term,” says Daniel Mitchell, professor at UCLA Anderson School of Management, “that would give him a strong place to run for senator.”  This article appeared on Jan. 3.

Los Angeles Times
Revelers Line Up for a Drier Rose Parade
Hundreds of thousands of revelers gathered in Pasadena for this years’ Tournament of Roses which over the years has become a major contributor to the local economy.  According to a study by the UCLA Anderson School of Management, the parade annually generates more than $578 million for the region as a whole.  This article appeared on Jan. 1.

Sacramento Bee
Optimism Abounds, But Why?
Even though the UCLA Anderson Forecast predicts “slowing housing markets will create a significant slowdown in California’s economy”, most California residents feel relatively positive about the state’s economy.  This appeared in Dan Walters’ column on Jan. 1.

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