June 13, 2011

Lewis E. (Lew) Leeburg (BS '54, MBA '64, Ph.D. '71), Executive Director of IS Associates Retires after Six Decade Relationship with UCLA Anderson

Led organization dedicated to understanding information systems

LOS ANGELES -- Lewis E. Leeburg (BS '54, MBA '64 Ph.D. '71) who came to UCLA Anderson in 1987 after a 31-year career with IBM and who served as Executive Director of IS Associates has retired. He also served as a lecturer at Anderson.

IS Associates was founded in 1978 by Leeburg and then-UCLA Anderson Professor Ephraim Mclean. The organization is dedicated to enhancing the understanding and practice of information systems leadership and management by senior IT executives, faculty, and students of UCLA Anderson, and leading providers of IT products and professional services.

Prior to returning to Anderson, Leeburg held a variety of positions at IBM, including manager of the Los Angeles Scientific Center. He played a key role in developing IBM's grant programs for business schools, especially the Management of Information Systems grant to 13 business schools in 1984-1985. Leeburg also held a variety of industry volunteer positions, related to both academia and business, including time as the first secretary and also treasurer for ICIS; he is a former board member of the Society of Information Management (SIM) and is a former member of the executive committee for the Southern California chapter of SIM.

Marking the occasion of his retirement, Leeburg participated in an interview with Frank Mottek of KNX 1070/CBS News. He told Mottek that IS Associates, "were started to advance education for those in the IT community ... for networking and for support, including financial support of Anderson and that original focus stayed with us all these years. We found new ways of doing those things, but that's still the focus."

Mottek then asked Leeburg what the big issues facing the IT community today.

"It continues to be what it's been for a long time and that is the complete and effective use of information technology for strategic purposes in the organization," Leeburg said. "(It's) not just having very efficient back office operations, good payroll and good supply chain procedures. The thing that separates the winners from the losers is the strategic focus of the use of information technology and this means -- among other things -- involving the top most leader, the CEO of the organization."

Leeburg told Mottek that he believes, "the future is bright."

"I know that there is a lot of gloom and doom about the U.S. economy now, but I'm an optimist," Leeburg said. "After all, I came in with Franklin Roosevelt in 1932, so I remember well, what's it's like when things were pretty dark. We pulled out of that beautifully and we'll do it again."

Contact Information

Media Relations, (310) 206-7537, media.relations@anderson.ucla.edu

Media Relations