CIBER Funded Research


A number of UCLA Anderson faculty and PhD students have received CIBER Faculty Research Seed Grants, Assistant Professor Development Grants or Doctoral Research Grants.

2008-2009 Faculty
Shi Zhang
, Associate Professor of Marketing
Grant Type: CIBER Faculty Research Seed Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
The objective of this research is to analyze the impact of Product Class Risk (PCR) - a consumer's perception of the risk inherent in purchasing any product in a specific product category - on brand extensions and to investigate the boundary conditions of such impact. This research is in collaboration with faculty from Beijing University and a doctoral scholar from NYU.

Sandy Jacoby, Howard Noble Professor of Management
Grant Type: CIBER Faculty Research Seed Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
A Finance and Labor Project - a comparative study, examining developments in the rich countries of Europe, Japan and the United States to study the effects of financial development on employment outcomes and to consider how politics mediates the relationship between them.

Nico Voigtlander, Assistant Professor of Global Economics & Management
Grant Type: CIBER Faculty Research Seed Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
"The Skill Bias of International Trade" - this research will explore Chile-U.S. trade data and combine these with detailed data on worker characteristics in Chilean firms from 1979-2004. Empirical evidence will be collected that may help to explain a puzzling observation: That globalization leads to increased demand for skilled workers not only in the developed world, but also in developing countries. This research is in collaboration with Diego Saravia, Assistant Professor at Universidad Catolica de Chile.

Romain Wacziarg, Associate Professor of Global Economics & Management
Grant Type: CIBER Faculty Research Seed Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
"Culture and Global Economic Exchange" - the main objective of this research is to develop measures of differences in cultural characteristics across societies and to quantify the effects of these cultural differences on the propensity to exchange ideas, goods and capital across national borders.

Paulo Giuliano, Assistant Professor of Global Economics & Management
Grant Type: CIBER Assistant Professor Development Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
"The Right Amount of Trust" - this research project will explore the relationship between trust, a critical element for trade, and income to maximize individual economic performance. The project with explore the European Social Survey (administered in a large sample of mostly European nations, containing measures of attitudes and behaviors across countries and over time). The trust and performance relationship of Italian entrepreneurs also will be studied. This research is in collaboration with Professors Luigi Guiso, European University Institute, Florence and Jeff Butler, Einaudi Institute for Economics and Finance, Rome.

Charles Corbett, Professor of Decisions, Operations & Technology Management, Joseph Jacobs Term Chair in Entrepreneurial Studies
Grant Type: CIBER Faculty Research Seed Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
"Global supply chain life-cycle assessment (LCA) and carbon foot-printing working group" - the objective of this group is to bring together academics, companies, and regulators with an interest in measuring carbon footprints specifically and environmental impacts in general in supply chain. Currently the group comprises of 27 participating academics from a wide range of institutions on four continents. The group will share examples of business-relevant LCA studies, collaborate on such work, organize workshops, and help inform ongoing efforts to develop standards for product-level carbon foot-printing (such as that underway at the World Resources Institute). The grant will fund the creation of a web site that will collect resources relevant to the working group and will be a key step in creating a community around the working group which will then be in a position to request larger grants from other institutions such as NSF, EPA, European Union and other governmental agencies.

Corinne Bendersky, Assistant Professor of Human Resources & Organizational Behavior
Grant Type: CIBER Assistant Professor Development Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
The grant will fund attendance at the International Association of Conflict Management (IACM) Conference in Kyoto that will allow Assistant Professor Corinne Bendersky to better understand how conflict and negotiation is examined from an international perspective and expose her to more research on this topic produced by colleagues from around the world (Europe, Asia and the Pacific Rim).

Richard Roll, Professor of Finance, Japan Alumni Chair in Finance
Grant Type: CIBER Faculty Research Seed Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
"Global Market Integration: An Alternative Measure and Its Application" - many previous studies of international markets have attempted to measure integration by correlations among broad stock market indexes. Yet such correlations have been found to poorly mimic other measures of integration. Professors Roll and Pukthuanthong-Le derive a new integration measure based on the explanatory power of a multi-factor model and have already used it empirically to investigate recent trends in global integration. Preliminary results indicate that countries with the longest data records uniformly display strong increases in market integrations. This research, in collaboration with Professor Kuntara Pukthuanthong-Le, San Diego State University will build upon the abovementioned research and results.

Sebastian Edwards, Area Chair and Professor of Global Economics & Management, Henry Ford II Chair in International Management
Grant Type: CIBER Faculty Research Seed Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
This research will focus on African (South Africa and Sub-Saharan Africa) firms and development. Visits and meeting will be conducted with entrepreneurs, government officials and international organizations to better understand how these low-income countries, with small domestic markets are working to expand their presence in a more globalized and challenging economic environment as well as understand how firms operate in an environment with severely constrained credit markets.

Michael Darby, Professor of Policy, Director of the John M. Olin Center for Policy
Grant Type: CIBER Faculty Research Seed Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
Professor Darby is leading a team that is creating and validating the multi-terabyte Science & Technology Agents of Revolution (STAR) Database which will serve the social science research community as a transformative platform technology for analyses in whole or part of the creation, transmission, and use of new scientific and engineering knowledge and of the creation of new commercial technologies. This research would explore and it is expected prove the feasibility of tying the science base derived from journal articles and patents to the wealth of data already mined by the research community for firms publicly traded on U.S. and foreign stock exchanges - this would enable other researchers to add relevant commercialization data as well as conduct fundamental research on international knowledge flows and knowledge localization, the creation and transfer of intellectual property, and the location and success of high-innovation. This research is in collaboration with UCLA Professor of Sociology, Lynne Zucker.

CIBER funding would fund a pilot project that would take the basic information and other information on the nature of discoveries and inventions and attempt to develop a concordance between the unique STAR IDs for firms and IDs like ticker symbols and CUSIPs which can permit researchers to establish an exact link to firms. It would include the identification of available databases in widespread use and the public IDs used to identify the individual firms in each database, as well as preparation of a crosswalk where appropriate to alternative public IDs used for the same firms, and development for a sample of the firms appearing in the STAR science database a prototype concordance. Successful completion of this test-bed project will provide the basis for an extramural funding proposal for a full project linking STAR firm IDs for public firms to the public IDs used by the relevant national and international databases.

Non-UCLA Anderson Faculty
Miriam Golden, UCLA Department of Political Sciences
Grant Type: CIBER Faculty Research Seed Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
"Political Corruption, Foreign Investment, and Growth in Contemporary India" - the aims of this research are to assess the political causes and the economic and political costs of widespread political corruption across Indian localities. For companies doing business in foreign locations, endemic corruption in business practices potentially compromises business activity. This research will investigate whether localities with greater political corruption experience less foreign direct investment, presumably because of the poor business climate corruption creates and whether, in turn, economic growth is less.

Ching Kwan Lee, UCLA Department of Sociology
Grant Type: CIBER Faculty Research Seed Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
"What Can Corporate Social Responsibility Do: A Comparative Study of Multinational Mining Companies on the Zambian Copperbelt" - this research is part of a larger project exploring Chinese investment and labor practices in Africa. The research will explore whether there are significant differences among the Swiss-owned, Indian-owned and Chinese-owned mines. This research is in collaboration with three local academics at the School of Business, Copperbelt University in Zambia.

Peter Katona, MD
Grant Type: CIBER Faculty Research Seed Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
Developed countries and underdeveloped countries will be studied to understand what, if anything, can be learned from manpower differences by expanding the research pool to better delineate which factors are the most important drivers attracting people into health care: education, background culture, bureaucratic structure of society, and national resources. It is inferred that a better understanding of this manpower issue will contribute to making U.S. health care more efficient and will provide a better understanding of how the U.S. fits into this important global dimension of health care.

2008-2009 Ph.D.
Claudia Townsend, Doctoral student in Marketing (Class of 2010)
Grant Type: CIBER PhD Student Research Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
This research requires data collection from respondents in a collectivist culture and will be used to fund a trip to Hyderabad, India - to research the impact of priming people to think about what makes them happy and how this impacts their spending of money. Findings will be incredibly valuable to a number of fields and practitioners including marketing, pro-social behavior, fundraising, and cross-cultural studies. This research is in collaboration with Professor Wendy Liu.

Christine Richmond, Doctoral student in Global Economics & Management (Class of 2010)
Grant Type: CIBER PhD Student Research Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
This research requires data analysis to analyze firm performance during periods of national economic distress and in particular to understand how firms in developing countries operate during periods of economic distress. The research will analyze specifically the performance of firms operating in the private sector in Cote D'Ivorie whose government defaulted on its sovereign debt in 2000 which then led to an economic recession. Comparison of firm performance before the default (1998-99) and during the default (2001-203) will be analyzed to determine firm response to adverse economic conditions. Ivorian firm performance will be compared to U.S. firm performance to understand how different, or similar, firms operating in a low income country are to firms in developed and middle income countries.

Brian Kelleher Richter, Doctoral student in Global Economics & Management (Class of 2010)
Grant Type: CIBER PhD Student Research Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
This grant will be used to allow presentation of Mr. Richter's working paper, "Why Not Adopt Better Institutions?" at the Western Economic Association International's 84th Annual Conference in Vancouver, Canada. It will also allow him to solicit feedback from those at other academic institutions who conduct research on the political economy, economic institutions, economic growth, and international development research in the area of international business. The paper modifies Acemoglu, Johnson, and Robinson's (2002) baseline regression to quantify the impact of institutions on long-run growth rates. The grant will also assist with hiring a research assistant to help with coding a new dataset being assembled that will be used for a project on the political and institutional determinants of firm-level financing decisions around the world. - re-visiting a hypothesis in the literature that firms access foreign financial markets as a substitute for having political connections to investigate the question of political connections and financing across countries.

James Paradise, Doctoral student in Department of Political Science (Class of 2011)
Grant Type: CIBER PhD Student Research Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
"International Trade with Chinese Characteristics: The Limits and Possibilities of Behavioral Change in the World Trade Organization in an Age of Expanded Global Regulatory Authority" - this grant will fund fieldwork in China to collect information for the three main empirical chapters of the dissertation focusing on intellectual property rights protection in China, the Chinese banking industry and the Chinese automobile industry. The collection of this information will center around in-depth interviews with government officials, industry executives and others in Shanghai and Beijing, and also possibly in Wuhan, Xiamen and Shenzhen.

Heather Bergman, Doctoral student in Department of Political Science (Class of 2010)
Grant Type: CIBER PhD Student Research Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
"Reliance on International Investment and Variation in the Adoption of "Business Friendly" Policies in Developing Countries" - this research will explain the relationship between policy makers in developing countries and the international investors on whom they sometimes rely to successfully implement policies. It will seek to understand whether governments that open their borders to foreign capital inflows (and outflows) are pressured into adopting business-friendly economic policies that they would not otherwise adopt. It will build upon prior research to account for policy makers' assessments of international investors' preferences, i.e. do policy makers in developing countries incorporate the expected response of international investors when formulating economic policy? The research will test the hypothesis that in countries with relatively high inflows of long term, foreign direct investment, policy makers are better able to know the policy priorities of investors than are policy makers in countries in which short term, portfolio flows predominate. Beyond statistical analysis of time-series data, interviews will be conducted with economic policy makers in the ministries of finance and central banks of Latin American countries, including Peru, Argentina and Brazil. The funding will be used to interview policy makers at the Brazilian Central Bank and Ministry of Finance.

2007-2008 Faculty
CIBER Faculty Research Seed Grants / Assistant Professor Development Grants

UCLA Anderson Faculty
Akhil Gupta, Professor, UCLA Anthropology & Alice Wieland, Doctoral student in Human Resources & Organizational Behavior (Class of 2011)

Grant Type: CIBER Faculty Research Seed Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
"Managing Globalization of Call Centers" - through ethnographic observation of call centers, interviews will be conducted with call center workers in Bangalore (the center of the IT-enabled services industry in India) and their friends and families in spaces of leisure and consumption and in homes and living quarters to understand and interpret the transmission and translation of global business norms. This research seeks to: 1) illuminate connections between productivity and life outside the office, and explore the relation between the culture of the workplace and broader shifts in the culture of urban India; 2) investigate changing gender, age, and caste hierarchies, and their effects on families, communities, and businesses, with a particular interest in consumerism and new patterns of spending on goods and services; 3) examine how the identity of call center workers is being reconstituted by virtual migration, by the fact that they interact with people in the North for most of their waking life; and, 4) explore how call centers are changing imaginations of the future for youth.

Sandy Jacoby, Howard Noble Professor of Management
Grant Type: CIBER Faculty Research Seed Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
This research will examine the intersection of labor markets and financial markets. It is motivated by the observation that there appears to be an association between financial development, especially equity markets, since 1980 and changes in corporate governance that have an effect on employees. There has been a worldwide shift of resources to those who benefit from financial development and shareholder primacy and in response unions in different parts of the world are developing political and economic strategies to constrain financial development through private and regulations. In some countries, the fact that union pension funds own significant amounts of equity allows labor to press privately to change corporate governance; in other places, labor is working to create new forms of financial regulation. These efforts are both single-country and transnational. These efforts will be studied through an analysis of quantitative and qualitative data (interviews) to determine labor's efforts and accomplishments, and to assess how institutions affect its capital market strategies. Interviews will be conducted with individuals and European leaders who are knowledgeable about labor's efforts with respect to financial development and meeting will take place with individuals from three types of organizations: national trade union leaders in France, Germany and Netherlands; transnational labor organizations; and GOs and NGOs (i.e. the OECD, the European Commission in Brussels, the International labor Organization in Geneva) and some academic experts at the Wissenschaftzentrum-Berlin.

Maia Young, Assistant Professor of Human Resources & Organizational Behavior
Grant Type: CIBER Assistant Professor Development Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
This research will build upon prior research that includes quantitative studies comparing Japanese individuals in Japan and American individuals in the U.S. - in particular findings that people from Japan and the U.S. assign responsibility (for negative outcomes) and credit (for positive outcomes) to organizational leaders in different ways. This grant will fund a visit to Japan and meeting with the Japanese collaborator to fully understand the business issues and culture for longer term research that will compare Japan and U.S. organizational life.

Shi Zhang, Associate Professor of Marketing
Grant Type: CIBER Faculty Research Seed Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
"Consumer Choice between Utilitarian and Hedonic Products, Domestic and Foreign Brands" - given that consumer choice decision making can be driven to a large extent by situational variables (e.g. psychological reactions to marketing activities), it is important, in terms of both consumer research theory and managerial significance, to investigate when and how Chinese consumers prefer products from America versus from their own country, and the role that brand plays in the decision making. This research aims to provide insights into Chinese consumers' psychology of decision making, relative to what we already know about Americans. The results should provide insights into the psychology of decision making regarding Chinese consumers when facing different types of products (hedonic vs. utilitarian) and brands of different countries (domestic vs. foreign products). It should also provide firms with possible ideas as to how to cope with the competitions in emerging markets based on consumer preferences for products and brands. Experimentation will be used to conduct the research and studies will be conducted using participants from China and the United States.

William Ouchi, Sanford and Betty Sigoloff Distinguished Professor in Corporate Renewal, Area Chair
Grant Type: CIBER Faculty Research Seed Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
"Global study of organizational change through the principles of complexity science" - the objective of this study is to determine whether the use of principles drawn from complexity science has played an important role in the success of large scale change efforts in companies across the world. International organizations selected for detailed study include: Tata Steel (India), ICICI (India), Wipro (India), Nissan (Japan), Ericsson (Sweden), Ducati (Italy), Allianz (Germany), DBS (Thailand), Singapore Airlines (Singapore), Haier (China), as well as U.S. companies including: IBM, Nordstrom, Staples, Continental Airlines, Walt Disney and Gillette. A combination of secondary and primary sources will be used. *Note: Tied to project with Shalini Lal, Doctoral student in Human Resources & Organizational Behavior. Project still in process.

Non-UCLA Anderson Faculty
Miriam Golden, Department of Political Sciences
Grant Type: CIBER Faculty Research Seed Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
For companies doing business in foreign locations, endemic corruption in business practices introduces serious complication. This grant will be used to assist with the collection of systematic data on corruption in contemporary India and assembly of the data into a useable dataset. The aims of the research are to assess the political causes of and the economic and political costs of widespread political corruption across Indian localities. The dataset will permit assessment of whether candidates for parliament who are under indictment are more or less likely than their non-indicted peers to be elected, and whether this difference is similar across the various political parties and states. It will also allow investigation into the economic consequences of political corruption across India's 28 states.

Matthew Kahn, Institute of the Environment, Professor, Department of Economics, Department of Public Policy
Grant Type: CIBER Faculty Research Seed Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
"Foreign Real Estate Investment in China: Opportunities and Risks" - this research study will include an empirical analysis to examine the opportunities and risks for foreign investors in China's real estate market. Opportunities and risks will be analyzed at the city level to include 35 Chinese cities with an aim to answer the following questions: (1) Which Chinese cities offer the highest real estate rate of return? (2) How much return volatility is there by city? (3) Do foreign investors face more real estate return risk than domestic investors? If so, why? (4) If foreign investors anticipate facing extra risk, have they responded by forming partnerships with Chinese investors? If so, have Chinese regulations and laws facilitated the formation of such partnerships? Literature will be reviewed and interviews conducted to summarize the possible social/economic/policy variables affecting foreign real estate investment. National- and city-level data for these variables and foreign real estate investment will be collected and a national-level model with times series data will be developed to examine how foreign real estate investment responds to general market opportunities and risks. A city-level model will further identify the impacts of city-level opportunity and risk factors on foreign real estate investment. City level characteristics will be studied to explain cross-city differences in the average rate of return and risk in real estate investment. This research is in collaboration with Dr. Siqi Zheng, Assistant Professor, Institute of Real Estate Studies, Tsinghua University, Beijing.

Mark Wright, Professor, Department of Economics
Grant Type: CIBER Faculty Research Seed Grant
Research Area Synopsis:

"Quantifying Haircuts and Debt Relief from Sovereign Debt Restructuring" - the goal of this research is to create a database of investor losses (referred to as haircuts) resulting from sovereign debt restructurings between 1970-2005 in an effort to quantify the cost of sovereign debt restructuring and debt relief. To date, no comprehensive analysis has been undertaken to document all restructurings during the modern financial period of countries that play an important role in the international financial arena. The research will aim to fill this gap by developing a methodology to estimate debt relief and haircuts and apply it to all emerging market borrowers. *Note: Tied to project with Daniel Dias, Doctoral student in Global, Economics & Management (Class of 2010)

 2007-2008 Ph.D.
Heather Bergman, Doctoral student in Department of Political Science (Class of 2010)
Grant Type: CIBER PhD Student Research Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
"Navigating Turbulent Seas: Emerging Market Policy Options in the Face of Volatile Capital" - this research will seek to understand how individual investors (and categories of investors) form preferences for government policies, as well as evaluate the outcomes of those policies and determine the degree to which they will pressure governments to surrender their policy freedom. A time varying statistical test will be performed to test the hypothesis that different types of investors constrain governments' social spending policies to different degrees. A survey to international investors will be administered to determine the extent to which their incentives and strategies influence their specific policy preferences for emerging market governments. The objective is to build upon and expand the only other existing survey to consider the policy preferences of international investors - the objective is to increase the sample size and the number of policies that the survey addresses as well as to achieve variation among the international investor types by administering the survey to a wide range of institutional investors from highly volatile hedge funds and arbitrage funds to more stable pension funds and insurance companies. Investor interviews will supplement the survey.

Bernardo Morais, Doctoral student in Global Economics & Management (Class of 2010)
Grant Type: CIBER PhD Student Research Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
"International Trade - Transportation Costs and Specialization" - the objective of this research is to analyze the consequences of the decrease in trade costs on the patterns of production and specialization of different countries. The objective is to empirically analyze the production and specialization patterns that are occurring as transaction costs decrease: Will specialization of production occur in the more homogeneous goods or will it be a widespread phenomenon? Will economies diversify their production of capital-intensive good? This research expects to answer these and other questions and provide a welfare analysis as to what the consequences of "globalization" are.

Rangapriya Narasimhan, Doctoral student (Class of 2010) in Human Resources & Organizational Behavior
Grant Type: CIBER PhD Student Research Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
"Opportunity Exploitation by Intrapreneurs: Understanding the Mechanics in a Cross-Cultural Context" - this research seeks to answer the question "why and when do intrapreneurs decide to exploit entrepreneurial opportunities?" The first study is a quantitative study where intraprenuers will be interviewed to understand how the interplay of individual differences, organizational environments and opportunity characteristics lead to exploitation of entrepreneurial opportunities. The study will be conducted in India and the U.S. to introduce a cross cultural perspective to understanding intrapreneurs and intrapreneurship in a cross national context - the cross-national comparison country will be India. Data collection from India will enable an understanding of the process of intrapreneurship in a cross-national setting in an Eastern country with cultural values that are vividly different from the West. Project still in progress.

Christine Richmond, Doctoral student (Class of 2010) in Global Economics & Management
Grant Type: CIBER PhD Student Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
This research will examine how the degree of contract enforcement in a country influences firms' financing decisions. The goal is to develop a dynamic model of firms' debt in which financing is constrained by an imperfect enforcement of financial contracts. The work will be closely related to Arellana et al. (2007) - while Arellano et al's paper examines debt financing in two countries (UK and Ecuador) at a static point in time, this work will analyze how the dynamics of firm financing decisions can evolve over time due to improvements in a country's contract enforcement framework and will also examine Portugal.

Alice Wieland, Doctoral student (Class of 2011) in Human Resources & Organizational Behavior
Grant Type: CIBER PhD Student Research Grant
Research Area Synopsis:
This research will examine the impact of Micro-finance, specifically commercial loans, on women's empowerment issues, and social norm changes in Latin America. The study also seeks to compare and contrast the gains of women's equality due to the greater financial independence women have as a result of access to capital, and the gains due to greater education. The project entails an analysis of the countries in Latin America where micro-credit programs have been implemented and a suitable host country will be determined in conjunction with large micro-finance organizations that UCLA Anderson has relationships with. Fieldwork will be conducted. The basis of the study will be survey data from a variety of villages/towns, some with micro-credit programs, others in which programs have yet to be implemented, and include a variety of in-depth interviews with local women that are current beneficiaries of such programs, and those that are not.