Workshops

Innovation Workshops

Spring 2014

Date

Speaker

Institution

Room

Details

April 11, 2014
3:30-5:00 PM

Kanetaka M. Maki

UCSD Rady School of Management

D307

Click here

Paper

April 25, 2014
3:30-5:00 PM

Jacob G. Foster

UCLA Department of Sociology

D307

Click here

May 2, 2014
3:30-5:00 PM

Gabriel Rossman

UCLA Department of Sociology

D307

Click here

May 30, 2014
3:30-5:00 PM

Mariko Sakakibara

UCLA Anderson

D307

Click here

June 6, 2014
3:30-5:00 PM

Patrick J. Adler

Carlos Eduardo Hernandez

UCLA  Department of Urban Planning

UCLA Department of Economics

D307

Click here

 

Management 298D‑Section 25, Special Topics In Management: Innovation Workshop

The Innovation and Creativity Workshop

 

Meets Friday, 3:30‑5:00 pm

Room D307 in the Anderson Complex

Instructors:  Professor Michael R. Darby  [e‑mail: michael.r.darby@anderson.ucla.edu]

Professor Lynne G. Zucker  [e-mail: zucker@nicco.sscnet.ucla.edu]

 

This course is designed for doctoral students interested in research on innovation, science and technology, and creativity from all UCLA departments.  The primary component is participation in The Innovation and Creativity Workshop which meets 10-12 times per year throughout the academic year.  Graduate students attend throughout the year but enroll in and receive credit for Management 298D-DIS 25-Special Topics in Management: Innovation and Creativity Workshop for Spring Quarter. Students may begin attendance in the spring quarter.  Tutorial meetings with either of the instructors on student research projects will be scheduled at the request of enrolled students. Light refreshments are served at each session.

 

The first meeting on April 4, 2014 will be an organizational meeting for students who are enrolled or considering enrolling in Management 298D-Section 12-Special Topics In Management: Innovation Workshop for Spring Quarter. Students are welcome but not required or expected to present work in progress during the Spring or any other quarter.  Students desiring to present work in progress this quarter can sign up in advance (via an e-mail with title and abstract) or at the organization meeting (with title and abstract) for a 45 minute or 90 minute slot (depending on demand) for April 11th or a later date.  See page 2 of the syllabus, the class CCLE website, or http://www.anderson.ucla.edu/faculty/strategy/workshops for the current schedule and page 3 for abstracts.

 

The Innovation and Creativity Workshop welcomes participation from faculty, graduate students, and other scholars throughout UCLA and southern California. The Innovation and Creativity Workshop is co-chaired by Michael Darby (The Anderson School and Departments of Economics and Public Policy) and Lynne Zucker (Departments of Sociology and Public Policy). It is sponsored by the Center for International Science, Technology, and Cultural Policy in the School of Public Affairs and by the John M. Olin Center for Policy in The Anderson School.

 


                                                       THE INNOVATION AND CREATIVITY WORKSHOP

                                                                                  Spring 2014 Schedule

 

Unless otherwise specified, all Spring 2014 sessions will be held 3:30-5:00 pm on Fridays in room D307 in the Anderson Complex.  Abstracts of the papers follow the schedule. Authors presenting the paper to the Workshop are indicated with an asterisk.  Four or five workshop meetings will be scheduled for Spring quarter as warranted by availability of speakers.  Enrolling students and others who want to schedule a whole or half session should let Michael R. Darby  <michael.r.darby@anderson.ucla.edu>  as soon as possible with a title and abstract so that a space can be reserved.

 

Apr. 4           Organization Meeting for students enrolling in Management 298D-Section __-Special Topics In Management: Innovation Workshop for Spring Quarter for Spring 2015

 

Apr. 11         Kanetaka M. Maki (Doctoral Candidate, UCSD Rady School of Management) presenting “Collaborative Innovation and Knowledge Creation: Theory and Testing with a Natural Experiment in Japan” by Kanetaka M. Maki and Vish Krishnan

 

Apr. 18         No Workshop – religious holiday affecting some participants

 

Apr. 25         Jacob G. Foster (UCLA Department of Sociology) presenting "How Science Thinks: Dynamic hypergraph models of science's unfolding structure" by Feng Shi, Jacob G. Foster, and James A. Evans

 

May 2           Gabriel Rossman (UCLA Department of Sociology) presenting “Mobilizing Cuisine: The Development, Institutionalization, and Politicization of the Gourmet Food Truck Industry” by Nicole Esparza, Gabriel Rossman, and Ed Walker

 

May. 9          No Workshop

 

May 16         No Workshop – Lynne Zucker event – details when available

 

May 23         No Workshop – room in use for make-up classes

 

May 30         Mariko Sakakibara (Professor in Strategy, UCLA Anderson School) presenting “Enforcing Covenants Not to Compete: The Life-Cycle Impact on New Firms” by Evan Starr, Natarajan Balasubramanian, Mariko Sakakibara

 

June 6          3:30-4:15 pm:  Patrick J. Adler (Doctoral Student, UCLA Department of Urban Planning):  To be announced

                   4:15-5:00 pm:  Carlos Eduardo Hernandez (Doctoral Student, UCLA Department of Economics) presenting “The Persistence of Shock Adaptability: How Breweries Survived Prohibition” by Carlos Eduardo Hernandez

 

Papers, coffee, and cookies will be available at each talk. Papers will be generally available in advance at the workshop page on the Anderson site: http://www.anderson.ucla.edu/faculty/strategy/workshops or (if the author does not want it posted) from Cynthia Rueda at cynthia.rueda@anderson.ucla.edu.

 

The Innovation and Creativity Workshop welcomes participation from faculty, graduate students, and other scholars throughout UCLA and southern California.  Graduate students attend throughout the year but enroll in and receive credit for Management 298D-DIS 25-Innovation and Creativity Workshop for Spring Quarter 2014.

 

The Innovation and Creativity Workshop is sponsored by the Center for International Science, Technology, and Cultural Policy in the School of Public Affairs and by the John M. Olin Center for Policy in The Anderson School.

 

ABSTRACTS:

 

“Collaborative Innovation and Knowledge Creation: Theory and Testing with a Natural Experiment in Japan” by Kanetaka M. Maki and Vish Krishnan

The growing complexity of industrial research and development has created the need for collaboration between industry researchers and university faculty. Drivers of such collaborative joint research between universities and firms, resulting in co-authored publications, have received relatively little research attention. In this paper, we develop and test a simple theoretical model of university-industry co-authored publications and the impact of an intermediary - the university’s Technology Transfer Office (TTO) - on such joint research. Our analysis shows that TTO can have a negative impact on collaboration by actively pursuing intellectual property (IP) and increasing the transaction costs for the collaborating parties, but the TTO impact is shown to be felt differently by junior researchers in comparison with senior University researchers. These predictions are examined using data collected based on a natural experiment in Japan. Japanese universities were “forced” to introduce a TTO by their national government in the years 1998-2002. We consider this exogenous shock and examine the impact of joint research, using co-authorship of academic articles between researchers at universities and firms as an indicator of joint research. Using panel data, the results of our analysis weigh in on the model findings: the creation of TTO has a mixed and differential effect on joint research between university researchers and firms. Our theoretical model and empirical evidence offers one of the first models of joint research validated with a novel empirical dataset and suggests that intermediaries such as TTO may adversely impact joint publications between universities and firms, if not properly managed. Implications and next steps are discussed.

 

 "How Science Thinks: Dynamic hypergraph models of science's unfolding structure" by Feng Shi, Jacob G. Foster, and James A. Evans
Science can be viewed as a complex system. It is apparently complicated; shaped by strong interactions between diverse components; and displays emergent, often unexpected collective outcomes. This characterization of science is strikingly similar to the one given by "actor-network-theory." Here, we explore how the actor-network of science provides a substrate on which science and scientists "think." Because scientific projects are better thought of as aggregates or events rather than the union of dyadic interactions, our approach models science as a dynamic hypergraph. Using millions of scientific articles from MEDLINE, we validate this approach and show how science moves from the problems posed and questions answered in one year to those examined in the next. We find intriguing modal dispositions in the way biomedical science "thinks": a tendency to think across rather than within types, as well as a special role for methods

 

 “Mobilizing Cuisine: The Development, Institutionalization, and Politicization of the Gourmet Food Truck Industry” by Nicole Esparza, Gabriel Rossman, and Ed Walker

The gourmet food truck industry has grown rapidly and spread geographically since the first trucks opened in Los Angeles in late 2008. There are now several thousand gourmet food trucks nationwide. Studying these trucks not only lets us observe in real-time the birth of a new industry, but see how it organizes itself. In many cities trucks have formed local trade associations to coordinate club goods and negotiate regulations around such issues as parking. The industry is heavily reliant on Twitter which makes activity in the field uniquely observable. To this end, we have collected over a million tweets from food trucks and used them both to identify political activity (e.g., tweeting links to petitions) and build a social network of connections between the trucks.

 

“Enforcing Covenants Not to Compete: The Life-Cycle Impact on New Firms” by Evan Starr, Natarajan Balasubramanian, Mariko Sakakibara

We examine the impact of enforcing non-compete covenants (CNC) on the formation and performance of new firms using matched employer-employee data on 30 US states. To identify the impact of CNC, we exploit the variation in the enforcement of CNC by state along with the fact that courts do not enforce such covenants between law firms and departing lawyers in any state. Using a difference-in-difference-in-difference specification with law firms and new firms that are not within-industry spinouts as the baseline, we find states with stricter enforcement of CNC tend to have fewer, but larger, and faster-growing within-industry spinouts. These results are consistent with the view that CNC enforcement has a selection effect on within-industry spinouts: while CNC reduces the rate of within-industry spinout formation, the spinout founders who have higher-quality idea choose to overcome the barrier of CNC.

 

 "To be announced" by Patrick J. Adler

Abstract to follow

"The Persistence of Shock Adaptability: How Breweries Survived Prohibition" by Carlos Eduardo Hernandez

This paper studies product-switching as an adaptation mechanism to sectoral shocks. Using 60 years of brewery level data on technology and product adoption, coupled with data on transportation costs and local regulatory changes, I study the mechanisms that allowed breweries to survive Prohibition (1920-1933). Prohibition prevented breweries from selling beer, but did not influence the supply of their inputs. Many breweries went out of business following this severe contraction in demand. Surviving breweries switched to other products, like sodas, non-alcoholic beer and ice-cream. The nature of product-switching was heavily influenced by the industry's historical path of market access, technology adoption and regulation during the 50 years that preceded Prohibition. I show how these factors predict survival and product adoption at the brewery level. Work in progress.