Marvin Lieberman

Professor of Policy

Phone: (310) 206-7665

marvin.lieberman@anderson.ucla.edu

Biography

Marvin Lieberman is Professor of Policy at UCLA Anderson School of Management. Dr. Lieberman's teaching and research interests are in the areas of competitive strategy, industrial economics, and operations management.

From 1982 to 1989, he was Assistant Professor of Business Policy in the Graduate School of Business at Stanford University, and during 1990 he was a National Fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University. 

Dr. Lieberman’s current research focuses on testing theories of industrial competition and strategic interaction, and comparing the performance of U.S. and Asian manufacturing firms.

Dr. Lieberman is the author of numerous articles in professional journals, on topics such as cost reduction and productivity improvement, market entry and exit, and strategic investment. His paper on "First Mover Advantages" (co-authored with David Montgomery) was awarded the 1996 Best Paper Prize by the Strategic Management Society. He is an associate editor of the Strategic Management Journal and Management Science. He has served as consultant to a variety of corporations, specializing in studies of strategic planning, productivity improvement and cost assessment.

Education

Ph.D. Business Economics, 1982, Harvard University
A.B. Economics, 1976, Harvard University

Interests

Competitive Strategy, Manufacturing Strategy, Market Entry, First Mover Advantage, Entrepreneurship, Industry Evolution, Industrial Organization, Productivity Growth, Japan, Automotive, Steel Industry, Internet Strategies
  • Marvin Lieberman and Shigeru Asaba. (2006). Why Do Firms Imitate Each Other?. Academy of Management Review, 31(2), 366-385. [ Link ]
  • Marvin Lieberman and Rajeev Dhawan. (July, 2005). Assessing the Resource Base of US and Japanese Automakers: A Stochastic Frontier Production Function Approach. Management Science, [ Link ]
  • M. Lieberman and Aya Chacar. (2003). Organizing for Technological Innovation in the U.S. Pharmaceutical Industry. In Joel Baum and Olav Sorenson, eds., Geography and Strategy (Advances in Strategic Management), Volume 20. [ Link ]