Technology in Business Education: Toys, Tools, or Threats Jason L. Frand Assistant Dean and Director, Computing and Information Services Adjunct Professor Information Systems Anderson School at UCLA Presented at The Technion Haifa, Israel April 26, 1998

10/17/98


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Table of Contents

Technology in Business Education: Toys, Tools, or Threats Jason L. Frand Assistant Dean and Director, Computing and Information Services Adjunct Professor Information Systems Anderson School at UCLA Presented at The Technion Haifa, Israel April 26, 1998

Is being an educator in the Information Age different than in the Industrial Age? If so, how?

Goal

A Phenomenal Technological Time

"How are things different in this Information Age as compared to the Industrial Age?"

Jenniferís Personal Reference Page A Possible End-Product

Guessing (or it is defining) the Future

Stages Of Technological Introduction

We don't know what new social forms will emerge

Our students, who will spend most of their working lives in the 21st century, will need to see the computer and related technologies as extension of themselves, as a tool as important as the pencil was for the past several hundred years.

A Vision for the Role of Information Technology

knowledge processing

Information Age Culture

New values

Changed Attitudes/Concepts

These changes are driving the need for us to view knowledge not just a body of facts but a process for acquiring new ideas

Modified Behaviors

Information Behavior Process Model

Evolving Information Handling Skills

To achieve these objectives both faculty and students behaviors must change.

The information technology productivity paradox.

no productivity gains

To achieve educational benefits from technological investments requires radical changes in faculty and student behavior

Otherwise, its "technology for technology sake."

Therefore, we need new instructional models and new learning models incorporating new tools and infrastructure

Anderson School at UCLA

Our Challenge

What, if anything, do we need to do different to get value from our investments in this technology?

If teachers continue to teach the same way, using the old approaches and evaluation techniques, will having a fully networked environment make any difference?

If student continue to approach the educational experience the same way, using the old tools and techniques, will investing in a laptop make any difference?

Alternatives Teacher/Student Environments

Examples of Opportunities for Changing Teacher Behavior

A Model for Student Centered Educational Responsibility

Goals

Personal Reference Page

Conceptual Strategies for Managing Digital Information Jenniferís Page Revisited

Strategies for Location Information Library Pages

PPT Slide

Open Issues

Why are we doing this to ourselves?

The educational bottle is already full, so when we add new content, what comes out?

What will motivate our institutions to change?

and a whole lot more...

KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT THE Challenge for the 21st Century

Author:

Email: jason.frand@anderson.ucla.edu

Home Page: http://www.anderson.ucla.edu/faculty/jason.frand