Henry Friedman

Assistant Professor of Accounting

Phone: (310) 206-1503

henry.friedman@anderson.ucla.edu

Biography

Henry Friedman is an assistant professor in the Accounting area. He received his Ph.D. and M.A. in accounting from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. His research interests relate broadly to how information is produced and used in firms and capital markets. In his dissertation, he investigated interactions between incentive compensation, reporting quality, and the role and responsibilities of the CFO, with an emphasis on the effects of CEO power over the CFO in the reporting process.
 
Friedman is also working on research related to disclosure and securities regulation, examining how disclosure standards affect noise trade and how securities regulation might affect firms’ investment and lobbying choices. Prior work has focused on the effects of self-efficacy on entrepreneurial investment.
 
At Penn, Friedman taught core managerial accounting and helped teach entrepreneurship and materials science and engineering courses.  He teaches the core Financial Accounting course at UCLA Anderson.

Education

Ph.D. Accounting, 2012, University of Pennsylvania
M.A. Accounting, 2012, University of Pennsylvania
B.S. Economics, 2007, University of Pennsylvania
B.S. Materials Science and Engineering, 2007, University of Pennsylvania

Interests

Incentive Compensation, Reporting Quality, Securities Market Regulation and Standards, Entrepreneurship
  • Cassar, Gavin and Henry Friedman. (2009). Does Self-Efficacy Affect Entrepreneurial Investment?. Strategic Entrepreneurship Journal, 3:241-260. [ Link ]
  • Henry Friedman. (2014). Implications of power: When the CEO can pressure the CFO to bias reports. Journal of Accounting and Economics, 58(1):117-141. [ Link ]