Miguel M. Unzueta

Associate Professor of Management and Organizations

Phone: (310) 893-0097

miguel.unzueta@anderson.ucla.edu

Biography

Miguel Unzueta is an Associate Professor of Management and Organizations at the UCLA Anderson School of Management. He joined the faculty at UCLA in 2006 after earning his PhD in Organizational Behavior from the Stanford Graduate School of Business.

Professor Unzueta's research explores how people understand their position within social and interpersonal hierarchies and the impact this understanding has on their perceptions of self, others, and group-based inequality. His latest research explores the manner in which people and companies define diversity and the impact that particular diversity definitions have on the representation of underrepresented group members in organizations. His research has been published in top management and psychology journals including Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Psychological Science, and the Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. In recognition of his research record, he was awarded the Eric and "E" Juline award for excellence in faculty research at UCLA in 2012.

Professor Unzueta teaches MGMT 409, the core organizational behavior course, in both the FEMBA and daytime MBA programs. He also teaches a seminar entitled "Why Sports Matter" in which students explore business and social issues in sports. In 2010, Unzueta was awarded the George Robbins Assistant Professor Teaching Award. More recently, he was selected by MBA blog Poets and Quants as one of the best 40 business school professors under age 40.

Professor Unzueta is currently a consulting editor for Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin and the Journal of Social Issues. He is also the faculty director for the UCLA Anderson/Johnson & Johnson Management Development Institute - an intensive program designed to enhance the leadership and management skills of managers and leaders of sub-Saharan African organizations devoted to delivering health care services to underserved populations throughout Africa.

Despite having lived in California for over a decade, Miguel Unzueta still considers himself a native Texan.

Education

Ph.D. Organizational Behavior, 2006, Stanford University
B.A. Psychology, 2001, The University of Texas at Austin

Interests

Diversity, Inequality, Organizational Behavior, Psychology, Sports

Recognition

Eric and E Juline Faculty Excellence in Research Award, UCLA Anderson, 2012
Selected as one of the best 40 professor under age 40 by Poets and Quants, 2011
Dean George W. Robbins Assistant Professor Teaching Award, UCLA Anderson, 2010

Selected Publications

Unzueta, M. M., Everly, B. A., & Gutierrez, A. G. (2014). Social dominance orientation moderates reactions to Black and White discrimination claimants. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 54, 81-88.

Unzueta, M. M., Knowles, E. D., & Ho, G. C. (2012). Diversity is what you want it to be:
How social dominance motives affect diversity construals.
Psychological Science, 23, 303-309. PDF

Unzueta, M. M. & Binning, K. R. (2012). Diversity is in the eye of the beholder: How concern for the in-group affects perceptions of racial diversity. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 38, 26-38. PDF

Unzueta, M. M., Gutiérrez, A. S., & Ghavami, N. (2010). How believing in affirmative action quotas affects White women’s self-image. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 46, 120-126. PDF

Binning, K. R., Unzueta, M. M., Huo, Y. J., & Molina, L. E. (2009). The interpretation of
multiracial status and its relation to social engagement and psychological well-being.
Journal of Social Issues, 65, 35-4. PDF

Tiedens, L. Z., Unzueta, M. M., & Young, M. J. (2007). An unconscious desire for hierarchy? The motivated perception of dominance complementarity in task partners. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 93, 402-414. PDF

Lowery, B. S., Unzueta, M. M., Knowles, E. D., & Goff, P. A. (2006). Concern for the in-group
and opposition to affirmative action.
Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 90, 961-974. PDF