Noah J. Goldstein

Associate Professor of Management and Organizations

noah.goldstein@anderson.ucla.edu

Biography

Noah J. Goldstein is Associate Professor of Management and Organization at UCLA Anderson School of Management. He also holds joint appointments in the UCLA Psychology Department and the David Geffen School of Medicine. Goldstein joined the UCLA faculty after serving on the faculty of The University of Chicago Booth School of Business. Dr. Goldstein has won awards in both teaching and research at the Anderson School.

Professor Goldstein’s primary line of research involves the study of the factors that lead people to change their behaviors. His scholarly research and writing on the topics of persuasion, conformity, and compliance have been published in academic outlets such as Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Administrative Science Quarterly, Journal of Consumer Research, Journal of Marketing Research, Harvard Business Review, Sloan Management Review, and in a recent book entitled Yes, a New York Times best-seller now translated in over 26 languages.

Dr. Goldstein has consulted for a number of private and public institutions, including Accenture, the United States Forest Service, and the United States Census Bureau. Goldstein has also served on the Scientific Advisory Boards of two Fortune Global 500 companies.

Professor Goldstein has taught Organizational Behavior, Leadership Foundations, and Persuasion and Influence to students at UCLA Anderson. 

Education

B.S. Human Development, 2000, Cornell University
M.A. Social Psychology, 2004, Arizona State University
Ph.D. Social Psychology, 2007, Arizona State University

Interests

Persuasion, Conformity, Social Norms, Social Judgment

Selected Publications:
Goldstein, N. J., & Hays, N. A. (2011). Illusory power transference: The vicarious experience of power. Administrative Science Quarterly, 56, 593-621.

Goldstein, N. J., Griskevicius, V., & Cialdini, R. B. (2011). Reciprocity by proxy: A novel influence strategy for stimulating cooperation. Administrative Science Quarterly, 56, 441-473.

Griskevicius, V., Goldstein, N. J., Mortensen, C. R., Sundie, J. M., Cialdini, R. B., & Kenrick, D. T. (2009). Fear and loving in Las Vegas: Evolution, emotion, and persuasion. Journal of Marketing Research, 46, 384-395.

Ackerman, J. M., Goldstein, N. J., Shapiro, J. R., & Bargh, J. A. (2009). You wear me out: The vicarious depletion of self-control. Psychological Science, 20, 326-332.

Goldstein, N. J. (2009). Harnessing social pressure. Harvard Business Review, 87, 25.

Goldstein, N. J., Cialdini, R. B., & Griskevicius, V. (2008). A room with a viewpoint: Using social norms to motivate environmental conservation in hotels. Journal of Consumer Research, 35, 472-482.

Nolan, J. P., Schultz, P. W., Cialdini, R. B., Goldstein, N. J., & Griskevicius, V. (2008). Normative social influence is underdetected. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 34, 913-923.

Griskevicius, V., Cialdini, R. B., & Goldstein, N. J. (2008). Peer influence: An underestimated and underemployed lever for change. Sloan Management Review, 49, 84-88.

Goldstein, N. J., & Cialdini, R. B. (2007). The spyglass self: A model of vicarious self-perception. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 92, 402-417.

Schultz, P. W., Nolan, J. M., Cialdini, R. B., Goldstein, N. J., & Griskevicius, V. (2007). The constructive, destructive, and reconstructive power of social norms. Psychological Science, 18, 429-434.

Griskevicius, V., Goldstein, N. J., Mortensen, C. R., Cialdini, R. B., & Kenrick, D. T. (2006). Going along versus going alone: When fundamental motives facilitate strategic (non)conformity. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 91, 281-294.

Cialdini, R. B., & Goldstein, N. J. (2004). Social influence: Compliance and conformity. Annual Review of Psychology, 55, 591-621.

Cialdini, R. B., Petrova, P. K., & Goldstein, N. J. (2004). The hidden costs of organizational dishonesty. Sloan Management Review, 45, 67-73.