To learn more about the professors whose work is posted here, click on their names to access biography pages where you’ll find links to more of their published research.

David Lewin

FIRMS URGED TO REDUCE COMPENSATION AND AVOID LAYOFFS - WATCH

TOP EXECS ESCHEW PERFORMANCE-BASED PAY - WATCH

"THE DUAL THEORY OF HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AND BUSINESS PERFORMANCE: LESSONS FOR HR EXECUTIVES"

Contemporary human resource management research, including studies based on North American, European and Asian data, finds that certain “high involvement” type HR practices have significant positive effects on such business performance measures as market value, rate of return on capital employed, revenue growth, revenue per employee, productivity, product/service quality, and even organizational survival. Another way to achieve enhanced business performance is by managing human resources for expense control. Consequently, certain “low involvement” HR practices may best fit some organizations and employees. READ MORE

"CUT PAY, NOT PEOPLE" - The Wall Street Journal, Jan. 29, 2009

"Still, most private and some public employers primarily responded to the early 2000s recession by cutting jobs. While those job cuts resulted in modest short-term gains in company financial performance, they also resulted in larger long-term financial performance losses because companies did not have the necessary talent to respond to economic recovery. If we are to successfully manage in and recover from an economic downturn as serious and widespread as the one we face today, we must go beyond traditional thinking about cutting costs. A broad sharing of pain through pay reductions among a company’s overall labor force works better than a narrow imposition of the pain of layoffs on one or more parts of a company’s work force."

William Ouchi

PILOT PROGRAMS SHOW PROMISE OF DECENTRALIZED SCHOOLS - WATCH

DECENTRALIZATION IS KEY TO BETTER SCHOOLS - WATCH

Miguel Unzueta

"'NEGATIONAL IDENTITY' A POWERFUL POLITICAL TOOL – It Can Pay to Accentuate the Negative."

Even if individuals cannot agree on who they are, they often agree on who or what they are not," a new study explains. "Simply reminding people of what they are not can transform attitudes towards different groups, shift loyalties, and political preferences, and thus drive coalition building. READ MORE