German Echecopar


Dr. German Echecopar is currently academic Director of the Center for Innovation and Entrepreneurship at the Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez in Chile and has previously worked in the private sector and in other educational establishments. He holds a degree in industrial engineering from Pontificia Universidad Católica del Peru and an M.A. and Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Notre Dame.

Professor Echecopar's research focuses on entrepreneurship and innovation. During the period 2005-2009 he published several issues of the GEM Chile report and the Chile Venture Capital Report. His article "Incubating innovative startups: some lessons from Chile" highlights the main hindrances encountered by innovative Chilean startups in their way to international competitiveness. Another article on "Angel Investing in Chile" argues that local investors have a stronger appetite for control and hands-on management than US investors. In "Seed capital for new firms" he looks at the most successful instruments in Latin America to help finance high growth firms and argues for the need to integrate a financial chain for these firms.

In the private sector he has created and managed three entrepreneurial ventures in the food and information technology sectors. He has also consulted for private firms such as LAN Chile, Té Supremo, CMPC (Chile), SAIV (Bolivia), and the following vineyards: Viña Santa Rita, Viña San Pedro, Viña Valdivieso, Viña Anakena, as well as with international institutions such as the Inter-American Development Bank, the International Development Research Centre and the Institute for International Economics.

Previous to his work at Universidad Adolfo Ibáñez, professor Echecopar was Director of the Economics Department and the MBA Program at the Universidad de Talca, Chile, and a visiting professor at Tulane University.

Education
Ph.D. & M.A. in Economics, University of Notre Dame
B.S. Industrial Engineering, Pontificia Universidad Católica, Peru.

Interests
Innovation and entrepreneurship, and Economics.